LAFS.910.RI.2.6

Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.
General Information
Subject Area: English Language Arts
Grade: 910
Strand: Reading Standards for Informational Text
Idea: Level 3: Strategic Thinking & Complex Reasoning
Date Adopted or Revised: 12/10
Date of Last Rating: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved
Assessed: Yes
Test Item Specifications
  • Item Type(s): This benchmark may be assessed using: TM , GR , SHT , DDHT item(s)

  • Assessment Limits :
    Items may ask the student to determine the point of view or purpose in a text and to analyze how it is advanced or conveyed by the author. Items should focus on meaningful rhetorical devices that specifically advance the author’s purpose or point of view.
  • Text Types :
    Items assessing this standard may be used with one or more grade-appropriate informational texts. Texts may vary in complexity.
  • Response Mechanisms :
    The Technology-Enhanced Item Descriptions section on pages 3 and 4 provides a list of Response Mechanisms that may be used to assess this standard (excluding the Editing Task Choice and Editing Task item types). The Sample Response Mechanisms may include, but are not limited to, the examples below.
  • Task Demand and Sample Response Mechanisms :

    Task Demand

    Determine an author’s point of view or purpose in a text and analyze how an author uses rhetoric to advance that point of view or purpose.

    Sample Response Mechanisms

    Selectable Hot Text

    • Requires the student to determine the author’s point of view or purpose and then to select an explanation of how this point of view or purpose is developed.
    • Requires the student to select an explanation of how a rhetorical device conveys a purpose and then to select an explanation of the effect that this rhetorical device has on the text as a whole. 

    Drag-and-Drop Hot Text

    • Requires the student to place the author’s point of view and show the development of that point of view in a graphic organizer. 

    GRID

    • Requires the student to place the author’s point of view and show the development of that point of view in a graphic organizer or other format. 

    Table Match

    • Requires the student to complete a table by matching an author’s point of view or purpose to rhetorical techniques that advance that point of view or purpose.

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Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
LAFS.910.RI.2.AP.6a: Determine the author’s point of view or purpose in a text.
LAFS.910.RI.2.AP.6b: Determine/identify the specific language/words that the author uses to advance the point of view or purpose.
LAFS.910.RI.2.AP.6c: Develop and explain ideas for why authors made specific word choices within text.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

Analyzing Political Cartoons:

The decisions students make about social and political issues are often influenced by what they hear, see, and read in the news. For this reason, it is important for them to learn about the techniques used to convey political messages and attitudes. In this lesson, high school students learn to evaluate political cartoons for their meaning, message, and persuasiveness. Students will learn about the artistic techniques cartoonists frequently use, and, for the summative project, will create their own political cartoon, analyze it, and give a presentation on their illustration.

Type: Lesson Plan

Wear Sunscreen: A Satirical Take on the Time-Honored Graduation Speech:

This close reading lesson focuses on Mary Schmich's comical commencement speech essay, "Advice, like youth, probably just wasted on the young." Students will take an in-depth analysis to discover her powerful satirical style, as well as the power of social nuances. Students will focus on academic vocabulary and answer high-level text-dependent questions as a guide for their comprehension of the essay, evaluating if her choice of words and wisdom remain valid, relative, and sufficient for the youth of today. Graphic organizers and worksheets, along with teacher keys, and a writing rubric have been provided.

Type: Lesson Plan

A NanoDegree that Can Get You a Programmer Position with Google? Must Examine with CLOSE Reading!:

In this lesson, students will practice using close reading strategies as they read a high interest New York Times article about new methods companies are using to train and recruit skilled workers for entry-level positions. A vocabulary organizer, text-dependent questions, summative writing exercise, and extension ideas are all included to help students analyze the revolutionary potential of the NanoDegree.

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Analyzing Logos, Ethos, Pathos in "The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro":

This lesson supports the implementation of the Florida Standards in the 9-10 classroom. It includes a copy of the text, a student activity handout, and links for background information and definitions of key terms. The purpose of this lesson is for students to read, understand, and analyze a speech through close reading and scaffolded learning tasks. At the conclusion of the lesson, students will write an essay that prompts them to use textual evidence to support their analysis of the claim Douglass makes in his speech "The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro."

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Ethos, Pathos, and Logos (Part 3): Writing Persuasively:

In this lesson, students will identify and analyze rhetorical appeals in a speech and write a persuasive essay using multiple rhetorical appeals.

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Emily Dickinson: Poet Extraordinaire of Language, Time, and Space: Part 2:

In this lesson, the second in a three-lesson unit, students will explore Emily Dickinson's style by reading and analyzing a variety of her letters based on the historical context and audience of each. Students will use the letters, along with an Atlantic Monthly article, as sources for the summative assessment, a letter to the editor written in response to one or several of Dickinson's letters or topics.

Type: Lesson Plan

Exploring Immigration and America (Part 2) through Informational Text- Judge Learned Hand's Speech:

This lesson is the second of a unit comprised of 3 lessons. In this second lesson, students will use Text Coding and small group discussion to analyze informational text, a speech given by Judge Learned Hand entitled "The Spirit of Liberty," in terms of content and persuasive techniques. This lesson will help students to read informational text closely, think critically and write in response to text.

Type: Lesson Plan

Ethos, Pathos, and Logos (Part 2): Statement Analysis:

This is the second lesson of a three-lesson unit on rhetoric and persuasion techniques. It is technology intensive.

Type: Lesson Plan

Rhetoric From a Birmingham Jail:

In this lesson, students will learn how to define and identify examples of ethical appeals, pathetic appeals and logical appeals using an excerpt from Martin Luther King Jr.'s "Letter from a Birmingham Jail" during the lesson and then through Patrick Henry's "Give Me Liberty or Give Me death" speech for a summative assessment. Students will determine the author/writer's purpose in these works, how they use rhetoric to develop their purpose, how the author/speaker's claims are developed in specific sentences, paragraphs, and larger portions, while citing textual evidence.

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I Declare War: Part I:

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What You Say: Language Context Matters:

In this lesson students will analyze three texts (Amy Tan's "Mother Tongue," Richard Rodriguez's "Se Habla Espanol," and Zora Neale Hurston's "How it Feels to be Colored Me") looking at language, tone, and style. Students will be scaffolded through use of graphic organizers and a Socratic Seminar to culminate in an essay about tone.

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorials

Rhetoric and Point of View in "The Solitude of Self":

Examine excerpts from a powerful speech on women, equality, and individuality in this interactive English Language Arts tutorial. You'll study excerpts from "The Solitude of Self” by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and examine how her choice of words, descriptions, and observations help reveal her point of view. You'll also analyze how rhetoric, specifically the use of logos and pathos, can help express an author's point of view.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Powerful Rhetoric: Analyzing President Wilson's War Message to Congress :

Learn how speakers use rhetoric to achieve their purpose. In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn how speakers can achieve their purpose through the use of pathos, ethos, and logos. Using excerpts from President Wilson's "War Message to Congress," you'll analyze how speakers use rhetoric to make their case effectively.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Power of Words: Analyzing the Use of Rhetoric:

Learn how to identify and analyze a speaker's use of rhetoric and rhetorical techniques. In this interactive tutorial, we'll examine the art of rhetoric as well as Aristotle's Rhetorical Triangle. We'll analyze the use of ethos, pathos, and logos in several historical speeches. We'll also analyze how speakers convey their point of view about a topic through the use of various rhetorical techniques, including repetition and rhetorical questions.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Teaching Ideas

Convince Me!: An Introduction to Argumentative Writing:

This lesson is intended to introduce students to the art of argumentative writing by familiarizing them with basic terms; allowing students to practice establishing the relationship between claims, reasons, and evidence; and analyzing an author's use of argument in a text.

Type: Teaching Idea

Dark Materials: Reflecting on Dystopian Themes in Young Adult Literature:

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To Kill A Mockingbird: A Historical Perspective:

This is a 10 day overview from the Library of Congress on a Historical Perspective of the time period surrounding To Kill A Mockingbird. Includes a lot of primary resources and writing activities.

Type: Teaching Idea

Unit/Lesson Sequence

Sample English 2 Curriculum Plan Using CMAP:

This sample English II CMAP is a fully customizable resource and curriculum-planning tool that provides a framework for the English II course. This CMAP is divided into 14 English Language Arts units and includes every standard from Florida's official course description for English II. The units and standards are customizable, and the CMAP allows instructors to add lessons, class notes, homework sheets, and other resources as needed. This CMAP also includes a row that automatically filters and displays e-learning Original Student Tutorials that are aligned to the standards and available on CPALMS.

Learn more about the sample English II CMAP, its features, and its customizability by watching this video:

Using this CMAP

To view an introduction on the CMAP tool, please .

To view the CMAP, click on the "Open Resource Page" button above; be sure you are logged in to your iCPALMS account.

To use this CMAP, click on the "Clone" button once the CMAP opens in the "Open Resource Page." Once the CMAP is cloned, you will be able to see it as a class inside your iCPALMS My Planner (CMAPs) app.

To access your My Planner App and the cloned CMAP, click on the iCPALMS tab in the top menu.

All CMAP tutorials can be found within the iCPALMS Planner App or at the following URL: http://www.cpalms.org/support/tutorials_and_informational_videos.aspx

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

Original Student Tutorials for Language Arts - Grades 6-12

Powerful Rhetoric: Analyzing President Wilson's War Message to Congress :

Learn how speakers use rhetoric to achieve their purpose. In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn how speakers can achieve their purpose through the use of pathos, ethos, and logos. Using excerpts from President Wilson's "War Message to Congress," you'll analyze how speakers use rhetoric to make their case effectively.

Rhetoric and Point of View in "The Solitude of Self":

Examine excerpts from a powerful speech on women, equality, and individuality in this interactive English Language Arts tutorial. You'll study excerpts from "The Solitude of Self” by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and examine how her choice of words, descriptions, and observations help reveal her point of view. You'll also analyze how rhetoric, specifically the use of logos and pathos, can help express an author's point of view.

The Power of Words: Analyzing the Use of Rhetoric:

Learn how to identify and analyze a speaker's use of rhetoric and rhetorical techniques. In this interactive tutorial, we'll examine the art of rhetoric as well as Aristotle's Rhetorical Triangle. We'll analyze the use of ethos, pathos, and logos in several historical speeches. We'll also analyze how speakers convey their point of view about a topic through the use of various rhetorical techniques, including repetition and rhetorical questions.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Original Student Tutorials

Rhetoric and Point of View in "The Solitude of Self":

Examine excerpts from a powerful speech on women, equality, and individuality in this interactive English Language Arts tutorial. You'll study excerpts from "The Solitude of Self” by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and examine how her choice of words, descriptions, and observations help reveal her point of view. You'll also analyze how rhetoric, specifically the use of logos and pathos, can help express an author's point of view.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Powerful Rhetoric: Analyzing President Wilson's War Message to Congress :

Learn how speakers use rhetoric to achieve their purpose. In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn how speakers can achieve their purpose through the use of pathos, ethos, and logos. Using excerpts from President Wilson's "War Message to Congress," you'll analyze how speakers use rhetoric to make their case effectively.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Power of Words: Analyzing the Use of Rhetoric:

Learn how to identify and analyze a speaker's use of rhetoric and rhetorical techniques. In this interactive tutorial, we'll examine the art of rhetoric as well as Aristotle's Rhetorical Triangle. We'll analyze the use of ethos, pathos, and logos in several historical speeches. We'll also analyze how speakers convey their point of view about a topic through the use of various rhetorical techniques, including repetition and rhetorical questions.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.