LAFS.910.RL.2.5

Analyze how an author’s choices concerning how to structure a text, order events within it (e.g., parallel plots), and manipulate time (e.g., pacing, flashbacks) create such effects as mystery, tension, or surprise.
General Information
Subject Area: English Language Arts
Grade: 910
Strand: Reading Standards for Literature
Idea: Level 3: Strategic Thinking & Complex Reasoning
Date Adopted or Revised: 12/10
Date of Last Rating: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved
Assessed: Yes
Test Item Specifications
  • Item Type(s): This benchmark may be assessed using: TM , MC , OR , GR , SHT item(s)

  • Assessment Limits :
    Items can be overarching questions about the structure of the entire text or about specific structural devices. Items should ask the student to analyze, not just determine, the author’s choices. However, a two-part item may ask the student to determine and then analyze.
  • Text Types :
    Items assessing this standard may be used with one or more grade-appropriate literary texts. Texts may vary in complexity.
  • Response Mechanisms :
    The Technology-Enhanced Item Descriptions section on pages 3 and 4 provides a list of Response Mechanisms that may be used to assess this standard (excluding the Editing Task Choice and Editing Task item types). The Sample Response Mechanisms may include, but are not limited to, the examples below.
  • Task Demand and Sample Response Mechanisms :

    Task Demand

    Analyze the way in which an author creates a given effect through structural decisions.

    Sample Response Mechanisms

    Selectable Hot Text

    • Requires the student to select sentences or phrases in the text that create a given effect.
    • Requires the student to select a structural device used by an author and then to determine the effect of this device on the work as a whole. 

    Multiple Choice

    • Requires the student to select the correct analysis of an author’s structural choice. 

    Open Response

    • Requires the student to explain, in one or two sentences, how the author’s choices regarding structure contribute to the meaning of a text. 

    GRID

    • Requires the student to drag into a diagram plot elements that work to create a certain effect. 

    Table Match

    • Requires the student to complete a table by matching an author’s structural choices with the effects they create.

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This benchmark is part of these courses.
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0400310: Theatre 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
0400350: Theatre History and Literature 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
0400360: Theatre History and Literature 2 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
0400380: Acting 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
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1000410: Intensive Reading (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021 (course terminated))
1001320: English Honors 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1001350: English Honors 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1001800: Florida's Preinternational Baccalaureate English 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1001810: Florida's Preinternational Baccalaureate English 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
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1002380: English Language Development (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
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1008320: Reading Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021 (course terminated))
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1009330: Creative Writing 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2021, 2021 and beyond (current))
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0400710: Musical Theatre 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2020, 2020 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
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1005348: Humane Letters 2 Literature Honors (Specifically in versions: 2020 - 2022 (current), 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond)

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
LAFS.910.RL.2.AP.5a: Identify the author’s choice of text structure to create meaning (e.g., order of events, flashbacks, foreshadowing).

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Formative Assessment

Analysis of "Minstrel Man" and "Tombstone":

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Type: Formative Assessment

Lesson Plans

Comparing Irony: The Gift of the Magi--Lesson 3 of 3:

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Type: Lesson Plan

Analyzing Elements of Fiction: The Gift of the Magi--Lesson 2 of 3:

In this lesson, students will analyze the contribution of point of view, setting, allusion, plot, and irony to the development of theme in O. Henry's classic short story, "The Gift of the Magi." Students will write an extended paragraph explaining how one device contributes to the theme. This lesson is the second in a series of three based on "The Gift of the Magi." The previous lesson provides instruction in using context clues to determine word meaning.

Type: Lesson Plan

Culture, Character, Color, and Doom: Close Reading Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily":

In this close reading lesson, students will read William Faulkner's "A Rose for Emily" one chunk at a time to examine elements of plot, culture, setting, and point of view that contribute to the mystery and suspense that lead to its dark, even terrifying, ending.

Type: Lesson Plan

Teaching Plot Structure through Short Stories:

There's more to plot than identifying the series of events in a story. After viewing a PowerPoint presentation on plot structure, students will read and analyze the plots of three different short stories (as a class, in small groups, and individually). Then, they will use an online interactive plot structure tool to diagram the plot lines. This lesson also includes a writing assessment with rubric.

Type: Lesson Plan

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Type: Lesson Plan

Close Reading: “My Watch: An Instructive Little Tale” by Mark Twain:

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Type: Lesson Plan

The Sniper by Liam O'Flaherty - Lesson on Conflict and Suspense:

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Type: Lesson Plan

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Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorials

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Learn to identify how authors create mystery, tension, and suspense within a story. In this interactive tutorial, you will learn how Richard Connell used exposition, foreshadowing, pacing, and the manipulation of time to build tension and suspense in the short story "The Most Dangerous Game."

Type: Original Student Tutorial

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After completing Part One, click HERE for Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Teaching Idea

Songs as a Way to Analyze Text, Words and Main Idea:

Students pretend that they have just landed a job with a local music magazine, and their first assignment is to write a short article in which they interpret the lyrics of a popular song.

Type: Teaching Idea

Tutorial

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Unit/Lesson Sequence

Sample English 2 Curriculum Plan Using CMAP:

This sample English II CMAP is a fully customizable resource and curriculum-planning tool that provides a framework for the English II course. This CMAP is divided into 14 English Language Arts units and includes every standard from Florida's official course description for English II. The units and standards are customizable, and the CMAP allows instructors to add lessons, class notes, homework sheets, and other resources as needed. This CMAP also includes a row that automatically filters and displays e-learning Original Student Tutorials that are aligned to the standards and available on CPALMS.

Learn more about the sample English II CMAP, its features, and its customizability by watching this video:

Using this CMAP

To view an introduction on the CMAP tool, please .

To view the CMAP, click on the "Open Resource Page" button above; be sure you are logged in to your iCPALMS account.

To use this CMAP, click on the "Clone" button once the CMAP opens in the "Open Resource Page." Once the CMAP is cloned, you will be able to see it as a class inside your iCPALMS My Planner (CMAPs) app.

To access your My Planner App and the cloned CMAP, click on the iCPALMS tab in the top menu.

All CMAP tutorials can be found within the iCPALMS Planner App or at the following URL: http://www.cpalms.org/support/tutorials_and_informational_videos.aspx

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

Original Student Tutorials for Language Arts - Grades 6-12

Building Mystery, Tension and Suspense:

Learn to identify how authors create mystery, tension, and suspense within a story. In this interactive tutorial, you will learn how Richard Connell used exposition, foreshadowing, pacing, and the manipulation of time to build tension and suspense in the short story "The Most Dangerous Game."

Family Feud: Analyzing Plot Twists in "The Interlopers" (Part One):

This tutorial is Part One of a two-part series. In Part One, you'll learn about the use of plot twists and their impact on a text. In this interactive tutorial, you'll examine two ways authors often create plot twists within a story. Reading excerpts from the short story "The Interlopers," you'll analyze and explain how the author creates several plot twists in the story by purposely setting and disrupting expectations for readers. 

After completing Part One, click HERE for Part Two.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Original Student Tutorials

Building Mystery, Tension and Suspense:

Learn to identify how authors create mystery, tension, and suspense within a story. In this interactive tutorial, you will learn how Richard Connell used exposition, foreshadowing, pacing, and the manipulation of time to build tension and suspense in the short story "The Most Dangerous Game."

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Family Feud: Analyzing Plot Twists in "The Interlopers" (Part One):

This tutorial is Part One of a two-part series. In Part One, you'll learn about the use of plot twists and their impact on a text. In this interactive tutorial, you'll examine two ways authors often create plot twists within a story. Reading excerpts from the short story "The Interlopers," you'll analyze and explain how the author creates several plot twists in the story by purposely setting and disrupting expectations for readers. 

After completing Part One, click HERE for Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Tutorial

What Makes a Hero?:

A great way to understand literature from epic poetry to literary series is to understand what makes a hero. In this very engaging animated video from TEDed, you will learn about the hero cycle, a common literary trope that can been found in many works like Harry Potter, The Hunger Games and even The Odyssey!

Type: Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.