LAFS.8.RL.1.1Archived Standard

Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.
General Information
Subject Area: English Language Arts
Grade: 8
Strand: Reading Standards for Literature
Idea: Level 2: Basic Application of Skills & Concepts
Date Adopted or Revised: 12/10
Date of Last Rating: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved - Archived
Assessed: Yes
Test Item Specifications
  • Item Type(s): This benchmark may be assessed using: TM , EBSR , MS , MC , OR , SHT , DDHT item(s)

  • Assessment Limits :
    Items may ask for evidence that is directly stated in the text or implied. Items may ask for specific and exact quotations, or a summary/description of evidence. Items may require the student to draw inferences from the text. Items should emphasize the importance of citing evidence that provides the strongest support possible.
  • Text Types :
    Items assessing this standard may be used with one or more gradeappropriate literary texts. Texts may vary in complexity.
  • Response Mechanisms :
    The Technology-Enhanced Item Descriptions section on pages 3 and 4 provides a list of Response Mechanisms that may be used to assess this standard (excluding the Editing Task Choice and Editing Task item types). The Sample Response Mechanisms may include, but are not limited to, the examples below.
  • Task Demand and Sample Response Mechanisms :

    Task Demand

    Select textual evidence to support explicit information or an inference drawn from the text.

    Sample Response Mechanisms

    Multiple Choice

    • Requires the student to select direct quotes from the text to support explicit or implicit information. 

    Multiselect

    • Requires the student to select multiple direct quotations to support explicit or implicit information from the text. 

    EBSR

    • Requires the student to select a correct inference from multiple choice options and then to select a textual detail or details that support the inference. 

    Selectable Hot Text

    • Requires the student to select words or phrases from the text to answer questions about explicit or implicit information in the text. 
    • Requires the student to select an inference and then to select words or phrases from the text to support the inference. 

    Open Response

    • Requires the student to identify and then explain in one or two sentences a piece of the text that supports explicit or implicit information. 

    Drag-and-Drop Hot Text

    • Requires the student to match pieces of textual support with explicit or implicit information from the text. 

    Table Match

    • Requires the student to complete a table by matching pieces of textual support with explicit statements or inferences from the text.

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
1000000: M/J Intensive Language Arts (MC) (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))
1000010: M/J Intensive Reading 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021, 2021 and beyond (current))
1000020: M/J Intensive Reading and Career Planning (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2021, 2021 and beyond (current))
1001070: M/J Language Arts 3 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1001080: M/J Language Arts 3 Advanced (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1002020: M/J Language Arts 3 Through ESOL (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1002180: M/J English Language Development (MC) (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1008070: M/J Reading 3 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021 (course terminated))
1008080: M/J Reading 3, Advanced (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021 (course terminated))
7810013: Access M/J Language Arts 3 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
1002181: M/J Developmental Language Arts Through ESOL (Reading) (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1009050: M/J Writing 3 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1006020: M/J Journalism 3 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1010000: M/J Literacy through Film & Literature (Specifically in versions: 2016 and beyond)
1010010: M/J Literacy through World Literature (Specifically in versions: 2016 and beyond)
1010020: M/J Literacy through Philosophy (Specifically in versions: 2016 and beyond)

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.

Related Resources

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Original Student Tutorials

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Teaching Ideas

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Tutorial

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Unit/Lesson Sequence

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Original Student Tutorials for Language Arts - Grades 6-12

Exploring Texts:

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Its all about Mood: Bradbury's "Zero Hour":

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When you've completed Part One, click HERE to launch Part Two.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Original Student Tutorials

Its all about Mood: Bradbury's "Zero Hour":

Learn how authors create mood in a story through this interactive tutorial. You'll read a science fiction short story by author Ray Bradbury and analyze how he uses images, sound, dialogue, setting, and characters' actions to create different moods. This tutorial is Part One in a two-part series. In Part Two, you'll use Bradbury's story to help you create a Found Poem that conveys multiple moods.

When you've completed Part One, click HERE to launch Part Two.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

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Learn how to make inferences using the novel Hoot in this interactive tutorial. You'll learn how to identify both explicit and implicit information in the story to make inferences about characters and events.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.