LAFS.4.L.2.3

Use knowledge of language and its conventions when writing, speaking, reading, or listening.
  1. Choose words and phrases to convey ideas precisely.
  2. Choose punctuation for effect.
  3. Differentiate between contexts that call for formal English (e.g., presenting ideas) and situations where informal discourse is appropriate (e.g., small-group discussion).
General Information
Subject Area: English Language Arts
Grade: 4
Strand: Language Standards
Idea: Level 3: Strategic Thinking & Complex Reasoning
Date Adopted or Revised: 12/10
Date of Last Rating: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5010010: English for Speakers of Other Languages-Elementary (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (course terminated))
5010020: Basic Skills in Reading-K-2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021, 2021 and beyond (current))
5010030: Functional Basic Skills in Communications-Elementary (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
5010045: Language Arts - Grade Four (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
7710015: Access Language Arts - Grade 4 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022 (current), 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond)
5010104: Introduction to Debate Grade 4 (Specifically in versions: 2020 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
LAFS.4.L.2.AP.3a: Choose words and phrases for appropriate effect (e.g., to inform) within writing.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

Tent Teaser MEA:

This MEA allows students to calculate the area of tents in order to determine if they will hold a given number of people. Students will determine which tent is best for the customer by analyzing each tent's specific features, calculating space for each family member, and using deductive reasoning and key details from the reading passages.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Best Stuffy Ever:

In this lesson, the students will learn about comparing the volume and the capacity of an item such as a bigger than normal stuffy. Each stuffy will be stuffed with the same type of object (tennis balls) to see which holds more. Through various readings, discussions, and activities, the students will determine which stuffy can hold the most inside. They will do this by analyzing a set of data with a set of criteria given to them by a client.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Great Sneaker Design Challenge:

ResourceID: 72432

The practice of science is collaborative and exciting. This lesson engages students as a STEM team working collaboratively to provide a company with the best sneaker design.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Lesson Formerly Known as "Wassssuuup":

In this lesson students are actively engaged in learning about the applications of formal and informal language use in written and oral communication.

Type: Lesson Plan

Lead Me Into Exciting Writing!:

In this lesson students will learn how to create "leads" for narrative writing using fairy tales as the springboard.

Type: Lesson Plan

Well-Defined Word Choice:

In this lesson, students will practice identifying and using word choice in their writing. Students will use photographs and text to study the concept of word choice in writing.

Type: Lesson Plan

Using Varied Transitions:

In this beginning lesson on using transition word and phrases, students will explore the use of varied transitions in a published book and then include varied transitions within their own short narrative writing piece.

Type: Lesson Plan

Money Managers!:

The main problem that the students are going to solve in this MEA is how to determine the appropriate allowance for a family of five children. This activity will allow the students to take on the role of financial planners as they examine a budget that has been earmarked by "The Davidson Family." The client has a particular amount of money to spare for their five children, however are unable to determine how much money each child should receive. The factors that students will need to consider at first will be the age of the children, the chores completed, and extracurricular activities the children engage in after school. The students might need to reconsider their thinking processes in order to take into account behavior comments and concerns that are also included.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Which Bank is Consumer Friendly?:

This MEA is a student's exploration of banking. In the first task, they will create a model that will rank banks from most consumer friendly to least consumer friendly. In the second task, they will need to modify their models to address additional banks and additional criteria. Students can then test their models while researching real banks and determining their level of consumer friendliness.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

How is the Earth Connected to the Moon, Sun and Other Parts of the Universe?:

There are many connections between the Earth and other heavenly bodies. The Earth's rotation creates night and day. The moon's rotation and revolution around the Earth creates the moon phases.

Type: Lesson Plan

Owl Moon: Similies and Metaphors:

In this lesson, students will be able to identify similes and metaphors within a piece of literature. Students will be able to determine the literal meaning of similes and metaphors and also develop their own non-literal meaning. The students will be able to then use their understanding of similes and metaphors to apply them to their own narrative writing.

Type: Lesson Plan

Banana County Public School-Painters MEA:

This Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) is written at a 4th grade level.

This activity allows students to think critically using information provided. Students will write a procedure on how they determined which painting company would be suitable for the client.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

To, Too, or Two: Developing an Understanding of Homophones:

An integral part of students' vocabulary and spelling development is to learn and understand the meaning of homophones. In this minilesson, students will identify and discuss homophones in a song. Then, student groups will create a skit that depicts the meaning of a homophone. Finally, student groups will create a comic strip version of their skit using homophones.

Type: Lesson Plan

How do Earth's Rotation and Revolution Work?:

This lesson demonstrates how the earth rotates creating nights and days. It also demonstrates the revolution of the earth around the sun. The earth and the sun's movements are connected.

Type: Lesson Plan

Keep it Cool –an Engineering Design Challenge:

This Engineering Design Challenge is intended to help fourth grade students apply the concepts of the flow of heat from a hot object to a cold object and that heat flow may cause objects to change temperature. It is not intended as an initial introduction to this benchmark.

Type: Lesson Plan

What Causes the Phases of the Moon?:

The phases of the moon occur because of the revolution of the moon around the Earth. The amount that one sees of the moon depends on where the moon is in its revolution around the Earth. The time it takes for the moon to rotate/revolve around the earth is about 28 days.

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorial

Formal or Informal...You Decide:

Learn when you should use formal English, or speak more formally, and when it’s okay to use informal language as you complete this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Student Center Activities

Vocabulary: Up With Words:

In this activity, students will produce more precise alternatives for overused words in context.

Type: Student Center Activity

Vocabulary: Worn-Out Words:

In this activity, students will produce synonyms as more precise alternatives for overused words.

Type: Student Center Activity

Teaching Idea

Dolphin Word Play-SeaWorld Classroom Activity:

Students will experiment with language and word play as they create poems about dolphins.

Type: Teaching Idea

STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

Banana County Public School-Painters MEA:

This Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) is written at a 4th grade level.

This activity allows students to think critically using information provided. Students will write a procedure on how they determined which painting company would be suitable for the client.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Best Stuffy Ever:

In this lesson, the students will learn about comparing the volume and the capacity of an item such as a bigger than normal stuffy. Each stuffy will be stuffed with the same type of object (tennis balls) to see which holds more. Through various readings, discussions, and activities, the students will determine which stuffy can hold the most inside. They will do this by analyzing a set of data with a set of criteria given to them by a client.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Money Managers!:

The main problem that the students are going to solve in this MEA is how to determine the appropriate allowance for a family of five children. This activity will allow the students to take on the role of financial planners as they examine a budget that has been earmarked by "The Davidson Family." The client has a particular amount of money to spare for their five children, however are unable to determine how much money each child should receive. The factors that students will need to consider at first will be the age of the children, the chores completed, and extracurricular activities the children engage in after school. The students might need to reconsider their thinking processes in order to take into account behavior comments and concerns that are also included.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Tent Teaser MEA:

This MEA allows students to calculate the area of tents in order to determine if they will hold a given number of people. Students will determine which tent is best for the customer by analyzing each tent's specific features, calculating space for each family member, and using deductive reasoning and key details from the reading passages.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

The Great Sneaker Design Challenge:

ResourceID: 72432

The practice of science is collaborative and exciting. This lesson engages students as a STEM team working collaboratively to provide a company with the best sneaker design.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Which Bank is Consumer Friendly?:

This MEA is a student's exploration of banking. In the first task, they will create a model that will rank banks from most consumer friendly to least consumer friendly. In the second task, they will need to modify their models to address additional banks and additional criteria. Students can then test their models while researching real banks and determining their level of consumer friendliness.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Original Student Tutorials for Language Arts - Grades K-5

Formal or Informal...You Decide:

Learn when you should use formal English, or speak more formally, and when it’s okay to use informal language as you complete this interactive tutorial.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Original Student Tutorial

Formal or Informal...You Decide:

Learn when you should use formal English, or speak more formally, and when it’s okay to use informal language as you complete this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.