LAFS.4.L.1.1

Demonstrate command of the conventions of standard English grammar and usage when writing or speaking.

  1. Demonstrate legible cursive writing skills.
  2. Use relative pronouns (who, whose, whom, which, that) and relative adverbs (where, when, why).
  3. Form and use the progressive (e.g., I was walking; I am walking; I will be walking) verb tenses.
  4. Use modal auxiliaries (e.g., can, may, must) to convey various conditions.
  5. Order adjectives within sentences according to conventional patterns (e.g., a small red bag rather than a red small bag).
  6. Form and use prepositional phrases.
  7. Produce complete sentences, recognizing and correcting inappropriate fragments and run-ons.
  8. Correctly use frequently confused words (e.g., to, too, two; there, their).
General Information
Subject Area: English Language Arts
Grade: 4
Strand: Language Standards
Idea: Level 2: Basic Application of Skills & Concepts
Date Adopted or Revised: 12/10
Date of Last Rating: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved
Assessed: Yes
Test Item Specifications
  • Item Type(s): This benchmark may be assessed using: ETC item(s)
  • Assessed with: LAFS.4.L.1.2
  • Assessment Limits :

    Items may ask the student to evaluate and correct errors that focus on grammar and usage or capitalization, punctuation, and spelling. Items should assess on-grade-level errors; however, once a Language Standard is introduced, grade-appropriate items may be written to assess continued mastery of standard conventions of English.

  • Text Types :

    Items assessing these standards will be used with a three-or-four paragraph text containing possible errors in capitalization, usage, grammar, spelling, and punctuation. The editing task will be similar to a student's essay in quality and difficulty. The text should be accessible for the grade and should assess the student's knowledge of grammar, usage, and language conventions. Texts will be between 100 and 200 words.

  • Response Mechanisms :

    These standards will be assessed using the Editing Task Choice item type. Descriptions of these item types can be found in the Enhanced Item Descriptions section on page 3.

  • Task Demand and Sample Response Mechanisms :

    Task Demand

    Apply standard English grammar and usage.

    Sample Response Mechanisms

    Editing Task Choice

    • Requires the student to select the appropriate replacement for an ungrammatical word or phrase.
    • Requires the student to select the correct version of a word or phrase to be used in a sentence.
    Task Demand

    Apply standard English capitalization, punctuation, and spelling.

    Sample Response Mechanisms

    Editing Task Choice

    • Requires the student to select the appropriate usage of grade-appropriate conventions. 
    • Requires the student to select the correct spelling of a word.

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5010010: English for Speakers of Other Languages-Elementary (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (course terminated))
5010030: Functional Basic Skills in Communications-Elementary (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
5010045: Language Arts - Grade Four (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
7710015: Access Language Arts - Grade 4 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022 (current), 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond)
5010104: Introduction to Debate Grade 4 (Specifically in versions: 2020 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
LAFS.4.L.1.AP.1a: Use relative pronouns and relative adverbs in writing.
LAFS.4.L.1.AP.1b: Use prepositional phrases in writing.
LAFS.4.L.1.AP.1c: Produce simple, compound and complex sentences in writing.
LAFS.4.L.1.AP.1d: Recognize and correct fragments and run-on sentences.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

Cookies, Fractions and Decimals, Oh My!:

This lesson asks students to recommend which cookie the owners of The Cookie Jar should add to their menu. Before they make their decision, the students have to convert decimal notation and fractions with denominators 10 and 100 to fractions with like denominators. Then they will be able to see exactly how many people voted for each cookie and they can factor in that information along with additional cookie facts to make their final recommendation.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Order Please!:

In this lesson, students will have an opportunity to learn about time transition words and use these transition words in their writing.

Type: Lesson Plan

Well-Defined Word Choice:

In this lesson, students will practice identifying and using word choice in their writing. Students will use photographs and text to study the concept of word choice in writing.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Rule of Order: Adjectives:

Students will learn and practice the rule for correctly ordering multiple adjectives modifying a noun to ultimately improve the precision of their descriptive writing skills.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Prepositional House:

This lesson will provide students with an opportunity and a framework in which they will be able to identify, understand, and apply their knowledge about prepositions and prepositional phrases.

Type: Lesson Plan

Walk This Way:

Students will be asked to rank the different floor tiles for the playrooms in activity centers throughout community parks. They will need to take certain factors into consideration when making their rankings. They will also need to calculate the costs of installing the floor tiles using the given measurement of the playroom and the floor tiles. The "twist" will be that the client now needs to include a storage room for some of the playroom's equipment. They will need to decide if to use the same floor tile or different from the playroom and the additional cost of the storage closet. After, they will add the total costs of the playroom and the storage closet. They will report their findings and reasons by writing letters to the client.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Fish Ahoy Fish:

Students will work in groups to assist a client in purchasing different fish for a fish pond. From a data table, they will need to decide which type of fish and how many fish to purchase according to the size of the each pond. After, they will need to revisit a revised data table to make different selection of fish and calculate costs for the purchase of the fish.

Type: Lesson Plan

Save Our Sand--An Engineer/Design Challenge:

This Engineering Design Challenge is intended to help students apply the concepts of weathering and erosion from SC.4.E.6.4 as they build devices to stop beach erosion. It is not intended as an initial introduction to this benchmark.

Type: Lesson Plan

Florida's First Engineers-An Engineering Design Challenge:

This Engineering Design Challenge is intended to introduce students to Native Floridians, their basic needs, and the challenges they faced in Florida's environment. Students will be designing and constructing a tool out of Florida native materials (items found in Florida's environment) that could meet one of the basic needs of humans. They will be discussing whether Native Floridians were engineers based on their ability to construct tools and shelters out of native materials in order to solve problems.

Type: Lesson Plan

Honey Bee Human--an Engineering Design Challenge:

This Engineering Design Challenge is intended to help students apply the concepts of pollination from SC.4.L.16.1 as they design an apparatus that will pollinate a field. It is not intended as an initial introduction to this benchmark.

In this Engineering Design Challenge, students will make a 2-dimensional model (a graphic illustration) rather than build a prototype.

Type: Lesson Plan

To, Too, or Two: Developing an Understanding of Homophones:

An integral part of students' vocabulary and spelling development is to learn and understand the meaning of homophones. In this minilesson, students will identify and discuss homophones in a song. Then, student groups will create a skit that depicts the meaning of a homophone. Finally, student groups will create a comic strip version of their skit using homophones.

Type: Lesson Plan

Student Center Activities

Vocabulary: Go Fish for Homophones:

In this activity, students will match and correctly use homophones while playing a game.

Type: Student Center Activity

Vocabulary: Homophone Hunt:

In this activity, students will choose the correct homophone to complete sentences.

Type: Student Center Activity

Tutorial

Story Starters: Prepositional Phrases:

In this tutorial you will learn how to write an interesting prepositional phrase to begin your writing. Press the button until you find the prepositional phrase you like…then finish the sentence on your own. Next, use the sentence you created to begin an amazing story! Or a poem! Or a descriptive paragraph!

Type: Tutorial

Worksheet

Worksheets for teaching ESL learners:

This page has many worksheets designed to help teach young ESL students. Some work on general language skills; others reinforce particular elements of grammar.

Type: Worksheet

STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

Cookies, Fractions and Decimals, Oh My!:

This lesson asks students to recommend which cookie the owners of The Cookie Jar should add to their menu. Before they make their decision, the students have to convert decimal notation and fractions with denominators 10 and 100 to fractions with like denominators. Then they will be able to see exactly how many people voted for each cookie and they can factor in that information along with additional cookie facts to make their final recommendation.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Fish Ahoy Fish:

Students will work in groups to assist a client in purchasing different fish for a fish pond. From a data table, they will need to decide which type of fish and how many fish to purchase according to the size of the each pond. After, they will need to revisit a revised data table to make different selection of fish and calculate costs for the purchase of the fish.

Walk This Way:

Students will be asked to rank the different floor tiles for the playrooms in activity centers throughout community parks. They will need to take certain factors into consideration when making their rankings. They will also need to calculate the costs of installing the floor tiles using the given measurement of the playroom and the floor tiles. The "twist" will be that the client now needs to include a storage room for some of the playroom's equipment. They will need to decide if to use the same floor tile or different from the playroom and the additional cost of the storage closet. After, they will add the total costs of the playroom and the storage closet. They will report their findings and reasons by writing letters to the client.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.