LAFS.4.SL.2.4

Report on a topic or text, tell a story, or recount an experience in an organized manner, using appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details to support main ideas or themes; speak clearly at an understandable pace.
General Information
Subject Area: English Language Arts
Grade: 4
Strand: Standards for Speaking and Listening
Idea: Level 3: Strategic Thinking & Complex Reasoning
Date Adopted or Revised: 12/10
Date of Last Rating: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5008060: Health - Grade 4 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
5010010: English for Speakers of Other Languages-Elementary (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (course terminated))
5010020: Basic Skills in Reading-K-2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021, 2021 and beyond (current))
5010030: Functional Basic Skills in Communications-Elementary (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
5021060: Social Studies Grade 4 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond)
5010045: Language Arts - Grade Four (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
7710015: Access Language Arts - Grade 4 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022 (current), 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond)
7721015: Access Social Studies - Grade 4 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
7708040: Access Health Grade 4 (Specifically in versions: 2020 and beyond (current))
5010104: Introduction to Debate Grade 4 (Specifically in versions: 2020 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
LAFS.4.SL.2.AP.4a: Report on a topic, story or claim with a logical sequence of ideas, appropriate facts and relevant, descriptive details.
LAFS.4.SL.2.AP.4b: Elaborate on each fact or opinion given in support of a claim with relevant details.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

Character Super Sleuths:

Fourth grade students will be challenged to become super sleuths, or investigators, to describe characters in depth, in terms of stated and implied character traits. They will use "investigative strategies" to explore characters, first as a group and then independently. The culminating activity will be an oral presentation to present the results of their "character sleuthing".

Type: Lesson Plan

Walk This Way:

Students will be asked to rank the different floor tiles for the playrooms in activity centers throughout community parks. They will need to take certain factors into consideration when making their rankings. They will also need to calculate the costs of installing the floor tiles using the given measurement of the playroom and the floor tiles. The "twist" will be that the client now needs to include a storage room for some of the playroom's equipment. They will need to decide if to use the same floor tile or different from the playroom and the additional cost of the storage closet. After, they will add the total costs of the playroom and the storage closet. They will report their findings and reasons by writing letters to the client.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Wondrous Water Parks:

This activity requires students to apply their knowledge of unit conversions, speed calculation, and comparing fractions to solve the problem of which water park their class should choose to go on for their 5th grade class trip.

Type: Lesson Plan

Owl Moon: Similies and Metaphors:

In this lesson, students will be able to identify similes and metaphors within a piece of literature. Students will be able to determine the literal meaning of similes and metaphors and also develop their own non-literal meaning. The students will be able to then use their understanding of similes and metaphors to apply them to their own narrative writing.

Type: Lesson Plan

Patrotic Pledgers:

This lesson has students defining a selection of words from the Pledge of Allegiance. After defining these words, students will identify synonyms for the selected words and rewrite the pledge in their own words. Students will then orally present their rewritten pledge to the class.

Type: Lesson Plan

Hold the Phone...Creative Drama!:

This lesson introduces students to an exciting, creative, and engaging way to understand story structure and story features by allowing the students to write and act out a play. Students make selections from a provided list featuring various settings, characters, and problems and build their creative plays using a ready-made story feature template. Working cooperatively, the students craft a short, creative play using characters, setting, problem, four major events, and a conclusion. Students use their mind, bodies, and voices to create a play from the opening scenes to the closing scenes. Students present their plays to their fellow classmates while being supported, instructed, and encouraged by the teacher. A rubric is provided to help teachers effectively assess the students.

Type: Lesson Plan

Save Our Sand--An Engineer/Design Challenge:

This Engineering Design Challenge is intended to help students apply the concepts of weathering and erosion from SC.4.E.6.4 as they build devices to stop beach erosion. It is not intended as an initial introduction to this benchmark.

Type: Lesson Plan

Sparkling Speeches:

Sparkling is the word! In this lesson, students will investigate transforming an exciting student-created expository into an engaging and quality speech using resources from the classroom and the school media center. Students will listen to a remarkable Martin Luther King speech provided by YouTube, confer with classmates on speech construction, and use a variety of easy to access materials (included with this lesson) during the construction of their speech.

The lesson allows for in-depth trials and experiments with expository writing and speech writing. In one exciting option, students may use a "Speech Forum" to safely practice their unique speeches in front of a small non-assessing audience of fellow students. A complete exploration and comprehension of introductions, main ideas with support details, and an engaging conclusion transformed into a student speech with a written exam are the final assessments for this memorable lesson.

Type: Lesson Plan

Florida's First Engineers-An Engineering Design Challenge:

This Engineering Design Challenge is intended to introduce students to Native Floridians, their basic needs, and the challenges they faced in Florida's environment. Students will be designing and constructing a tool out of Florida native materials (items found in Florida's environment) that could meet one of the basic needs of humans. They will be discussing whether Native Floridians were engineers based on their ability to construct tools and shelters out of native materials in order to solve problems.

Type: Lesson Plan

Honey Bee Human--an Engineering Design Challenge:

This Engineering Design Challenge is intended to help students apply the concepts of pollination from SC.4.L.16.1 as they design an apparatus that will pollinate a field. It is not intended as an initial introduction to this benchmark.

In this Engineering Design Challenge, students will make a 2-dimensional model (a graphic illustration) rather than build a prototype.

Type: Lesson Plan

"The Day Jimmy's Boa Ate the Wash"; Using Text Structure to formulate a Narrative:

In this lesson, students will create their own original narrative using the text structure (cause/effect) that author Trinka Hakes Nobles uses in the book The Day Jimmy's Boa Ate the Wash. The students are expected to use strong verbs and descriptive adjectives to strengthen their writing. Students will use Microsoft Word to publish their writing and share with the class. This lesson uses the gradual release model so students will receive practice at writing the narrative with teacher support as a whole class and with teacher support in small groups before writing a narrative on their own.

Type: Lesson Plan

To Flow or Blow: Which One is Best for Here?:

In this lesson, 4th grade students will use web-based articles and maps to look at current and potential air (wind) and water (hydro)power plants for their, or a teacher-given, local area. Students will present an argument for which type of renewable energy plant they believe would be best citing evidence from text(s) and/or map(s). Students may work and/or write in groups or individually. Access points are included for this lesson.

Type: Lesson Plan

Teaching Idea

Wildlife Reserve-SeaWorld Classroom Activity:

In this activity, the students will design a protected environment for an endangered animal that encourages the animal's natural behaviors and meets its physical requirements. Students will explain to their classmates why the protected environment is essential for the endangered animal.

Type: Teaching Idea

STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

Walk This Way:

Students will be asked to rank the different floor tiles for the playrooms in activity centers throughout community parks. They will need to take certain factors into consideration when making their rankings. They will also need to calculate the costs of installing the floor tiles using the given measurement of the playroom and the floor tiles. The "twist" will be that the client now needs to include a storage room for some of the playroom's equipment. They will need to decide if to use the same floor tile or different from the playroom and the additional cost of the storage closet. After, they will add the total costs of the playroom and the storage closet. They will report their findings and reasons by writing letters to the client.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Wondrous Water Parks:

This activity requires students to apply their knowledge of unit conversions, speed calculation, and comparing fractions to solve the problem of which water park their class should choose to go on for their 5th grade class trip.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Teaching Idea

Wildlife Reserve-SeaWorld Classroom Activity:

In this activity, the students will design a protected environment for an endangered animal that encourages the animal's natural behaviors and meets its physical requirements. Students will explain to their classmates why the protected environment is essential for the endangered animal.

Type: Teaching Idea