LAFS.1.SL.1.1Archived Standard

Participate in collaborative conversations with diverse partners about grade 1 topics and texts with peers and adults in small and larger groups.
  1. Follow agreed-upon rules for discussions (e.g., listening to others with care, speaking one at a time about the topics and texts under discussion).
  2. Build on others’ talk in conversations by responding to the comments of others through multiple exchanges.
  3. Ask questions to clear up any confusion about the topics and texts under discussion.
General Information
Subject Area: English Language Arts
Grade: 1
Strand: Standards for Speaking and Listening
Idea: Level 2: Basic Application of Skills & Concepts
Date Adopted or Revised: 12/10
Date of Last Rating: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved - Archived

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5012030: Mathematics - Grade One (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5020020: Science Grade One (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5008030: Health - Grade 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5010010: English for Speakers of Other Languages-Elementary (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (course terminated))
5010020: Basic Skills in Reading-K-2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021, 2021 and beyond (current))
5010030: Functional Basic Skills in Communications-Elementary (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5021030: Social Studies Grade 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
5010042: Language Arts - Grade One (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021, 2021 and beyond)
7712020: Access Mathematics Grade 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
7720020: Access Science Grade 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond)
7710012: Access Language Arts - Grade 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
7721012: Access Social Studies - Grade 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond)
5003020: Dance - Grade 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5001020: Art - Grade 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5013070: Music - Grade 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5011010: Library Skills/Information Literacy Grade 1 (Specifically in versions: 2016 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
5002010: Introduction to Computer Science 1 (Specifically in versions: 2016 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
7708010: Access Health Grade 1 (Specifically in versions: 2020 and beyond)
5004210: Theatre Grade 1 (Specifically in versions: 2020 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5010101: Introduction to Debate Grade 1 (Specifically in versions: 2020 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

Gr. 1 Lesson 1-Everglades Animal Exploration:

Everglades Animal Hunt is lesson 1 of a 3 lesson unit. Students will learn that animals communicate through their senses. The students will use their knowledge and imagination to vocally and/or physically imitate wildlife of the Everglades.

Type: Lesson Plan

David's big problem:

In this lesson students will work collaboratively in guided groups to resolve conflicts while demonstrating respect and kindness with a focus on recognizing the characteristics of responsible citizenship. They will collect data into categories and represent the results using tally marks or pictographs.

Type: Lesson Plan

Pete's Brand New Shoes:

Pete the Cat wants a new pair of shoes and needs the students' help selecting the right ones for him. Students will work with a team to select the best shoes for Pete. Students will use symbols to compare the costs of shoes within 100.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Fairycat Bookstore:

This MEA lesson is designed for a First grade level. Students will be working in small groups to figure out what book series is best for the book store. They will vote on the best choice by using a bar graph.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Let's Play!:

The fundraiser was a huge success! Now students must decide the best way to spend the money to buy new playground equipment.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Get Up and Move!:

This is a first grade MEA that asks students to work together to help each other explore different ways to problem solve. The students are presented with a problem in which they have to choose the top three choices of sporting equipment that will help raise the most money for a move-a-thon event. They will be asked to reevaluate their original procedures, when given a second set of data.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Blankets for Babies:

Students will choose which baby blanket a store should buy to sell, based on these factors; size, how soft it is, color, and safety. Students will rank four blankets from best to worst.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Adopt-A-Road:

Students will use a realistic scenario in order to analyze the steps for adopting a road in their own community. The students will be required to activate prior knowledge about litter and natural habitats, brainstorm independently, and also collaborate within cooperative groups to create a written procedure to explain their reasoning. Students will to take into consideration wildlife, traffic, the amount of litter, and the length of the road (which affects the cost of clean-up).

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Tub Toys, Ahoy!:

Students will choose the best tub toy for a store to purchase based on several properties including floating, squirting, squeaking and safety.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Fill It Up - Piñatas!:

This MEA focuses on students' problem solving skills. After reading a story about what is in a piñata, students are asked to help a company find the best way to fill a piñata. It focuses on math skills, including counting and adding three numbers to make 20.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Water Park Fun!:

This MEA require students to read and identify common water safety practices. Students will then review and analyze a data for a family who wishes to attend a water park with their children. After reading the passage and identifying the needs of the client as per the client letter, students will rank the water parks from best to worst and explain the procedure used.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Butterfly Trail:

Students will use a realistic scenario in order to create a Butterfly Trail for their school. The students will be required to activate prior knowledge, brainstorm independently, and also collaborate within cooperative groups to create a model to explain their reasoning.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Pinata! Pinata!:

This is a Science lesson based on force and movement. As a plus the students will also be learning a little bit about the Hispanic culture and use of piñatas. Students will practice their math skills by reading a data table and adding tens and ones.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Close Reading: The Relatives Came:

This lesson allows the students to retell a story and determine the central message and key details in a text using the book The Relatives Came by Cynthia Rylant. Through several readings, the students will increase their comprehension of the text by focusing on the story elements, using key details, and making connections. The students will be encouraged to answer and discuss higher order questions to develop a better understanding of the text. Finally, the students will have an opportunity to write their own personal narrative.

Type: Lesson Plan

A Close Reading of The Little Red Hen:

In this lesson, the students will listen to the teacher read aloud the folk tale "The Little Red Hen." The students will collaborate with their teacher and peers during a close reading in order to determine the central message or lesson of the folk tale. They will also analyze the text to determine the meaning of selected vocabulary words, as well as identify story elements and character traits.

Type: Lesson Plan

What Do You Do With A Tail Like This? Close Reading Lesson on Main Topic and Key Details:

In this lesson, students will use What Do You Do With A Tail Like This? by Steve Jenkins and Robin Page to identify the main topic and key details using the illustrations and text with teacher support, in pairs, and independently. Students will work to complete a 3-2-1 card, a group poster and presentation, as well as an independent explanatory writing to show their understanding of the main topic, subtopics, and key details.

Type: Lesson Plan

Close Reading Exemplar: The Wind:

The goal of this exemplar is to teach young students to read closely and critically in order to comprehend complex literary text. In this lesson sequence, the teacher uses a variety of strategies to actively engage students in searching for meaning in the figurative language and rich vocabulary of a poem. Students learn to test inferences against specific details of the text, to take three dimensional "notes" and to use those notes to more deeply understand the meaning of the poem. Discussion and a short writing exercise help students to synthesize what they have learned.

Type: Lesson Plan

Best Babysitter:

Teams of students will use math to solve an open-ended, real-world problem to help their parent or caregiver choose the best babysitter. Students will apply mathematical skills of place value (two-digit number tens and ones) and counting to perform math calculations while analyzing data sets. This MEA will facilitate students demonstrating higher level critical thinking and problem solving during class discussions and in writing.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

I Can Fix It With Your Help!:

In this lesson, students will listen to informational text about an animal and critique a sample informative paragraph by giving suggestions about how to improve the sample writing. Students will then read and write about their favorite animal. They will present and take suggestions from classmates. Students will also revise their writing through use of suggestions given by their peers.

Type: Lesson Plan

Pizza Party Planners:

In the story Curious George and the Pizza Party (by Rey, H.A., and Margret Rey), Curious George attends a pizza party for a friend. Now the man with the yellow hat wants to plan his own pizza party for Curious George, but he needs the students' help. Help the man with the yellow hat use the data about the different pizza companies in his area to rank the options from best to worst, considering the toppings offered, crust options, prices, and customer satisfaction ratings. Then the students will use the special promotions from each pizza company and their math skills to figure out which pizza place offers the best deals. Each team of students will write letters to the man with the yellow hat explaining how they ranked the companies and why they chose their rankings to help him choose the best pizza for George's party.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Noritos Chip Company:

In this first grade MEA, the students will use a given data set to help the chip company determine which new flavor of chips it should add to their line of chips. Students will analyze the data and determine how to rank the chips. Students will work in groups to determine the procedure needed to rank the chips and report the information back to the chip company.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Terrific Toy Company:

The Terrific Toy Company needs the help of students to sort toys into value packs. The students will use observable properties of the toys to sort them and create three example packs.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Quilt Squares:

Students will use pattern blocks to create a quilt square for the Quick Quilters Society. They will have to consider information on a data chart to help them create their squares. They will have to add up the cost to make their square, too.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Arthur's Perfect Pet:

In the story Arthur's Pet Business, Arthur shows his parents that he is responsible enough to deserve a pet dog and his mom gives him permission to get one. However, Arthur needs your help choosing the perfect dog. Help Arthur meet all the requirements needed to find the perfect pet for his family from the research he shares with you about the breeds they are considering, taking into consideration size, shedding, barking, friendliness, etc. Then write a justification to describe why you chose the perfect pet for Arthur and his family.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Crumbly Cookie Company:

Students will determine the best variety for a new cookie entering the market. Students will have to consider flavor, smell, appearance, and the number of cookies in the package.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Flower Garden:

The students will determine which flowers are the best to plant in a flower garden. The students will receive data about the hardiness of each flower, the amount of sun and water each needs, and the number of flowers each plant will produce. Students may choose a plant that produces many flowers but may not be very hardy.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Elements of a Short Story:

In this lesson, students will identify story elements. The students will also create story maps as teams and then work independently to write their own narrative stories based on the completed maps. They will edit and revise their narratives with a partner.

Type: Lesson Plan

Seaweed Science:

This lesson allows students to begin learning the scientific process of prediction using seaweed. The students will be engaged in a hands-on investigation and will find out that many products they currently eat contain seaweed.

Type: Lesson Plan

Feeling the Fall:

Feeling the Fall is a lesson that incorporates fluency, the five senses, and writing all in one. Students will work cooperatively to perform a play on fall, practicing fluency, accuracy, and expression. Then students will explore the fall season using their senses, integrating science standards into academic standards reading. Finally, students will have the opportunity to write about the fall season and publish their writing using technology.

Type: Lesson Plan

I See the Tree – Vowel Team /ee/:

In this lesson, students will identify the vowel team /ee/ through classroom connections, media connections, and real world connections. The students will develop a class-made /ee/ tree in which the students will increase their vocabulary with a variety of /ee/ words.

Type: Lesson Plan

"Handy" Constellations:

This lesson allows students to explore constellations, starting with Gemini. Students will learn about constellations and learn that there are more stars in the sky than anyone can easily count. Students will create a constellation of their own using the outline of their hand. At the end of the lesson, the students will understand that constellations can be viewed differently by others. A worksheet will be completed as a summative assessment.

Type: Lesson Plan

Matter is EVERYWHERE:

Students will identify matter that is in their environment. Students will sort objects by the observable properties size, shape, color. Students will explore and come to conclusions about the size, shape, and color of matter. This lesson plan is part 1 of a 4 part unit which addresses properties of matter. (The properties of temperature, texture, weight, and ability to sink or float will be addressed in subsequent lessons).

Type: Lesson Plan

Observation: The Stars in the Sky:

This is part one of a thematic unit that will take approximately one week to complete with one hour for each day. Students begin be looking at a picture of the stars to peek their interest in the unit and begin to form questions about the stars as the unit goes on. Students learn the word "observation" and then use sight to view "star jars" within groups. The class then answers questions, forms ideas, and draws pictures about what they observe. The teacher guides students into understanding that the stars are scattered unevenly through the sky, and there are too many stars for anyone to possibly count.

Type: Lesson Plan

Digging Deep for Dino Details and Discussion:

In this unit, students will identify appropriately leveled informational text on dinosaurs and identify the key details of the text. The students will create a detail web using evidence from the text and will then write an explanatory paper about their choice of dinosaur. The students will also participate in a guided class discussion. The students will learn the guidelines and procedures for successful discussion and will also learn how to come prepared for discussion by providing supporting information from texts that have been read.

Type: Lesson Plan

Doing Our Jobs:

Students will learn that there are rules to be followed or jobs to be done in the classroom. Students will also learn how to listen and speak to others.

Type: Lesson Plan

Arthur's Directorial Debut: A Thanksgiving MEA:

In the story Arthur's Thanksgiving, Arthur is chosen to direct the school's Thanksgiving play, but he has a hard time deciding who should play each part. In this MEA, the students will work in teams to help Arthur choose the perfect person for each part in the play. Then the students will write a letter to Arthur explaining their casting decisions and their decision making process. During the lesson, students will also have to reconsider their casting decisions and help Arthur solve the problem in the story when no one wants to dress up as the most important part in the play, the turkey!

Type: Lesson Plan

Push and Pull Magnet Art – an Engineering Design Challenge:

This Engineering Design Challenge is intended to help first grade students apply the concepts of the various ways objects can move, and that the way to change the motion of an object is to apply a push or a pull. It is not intended as an initial introduction to this benchmark.

Type: Lesson Plan

STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

Adopt-A-Road:

Students will use a realistic scenario in order to analyze the steps for adopting a road in their own community. The students will be required to activate prior knowledge about litter and natural habitats, brainstorm independently, and also collaborate within cooperative groups to create a written procedure to explain their reasoning. Students will to take into consideration wildlife, traffic, the amount of litter, and the length of the road (which affects the cost of clean-up).

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Arthur's Directorial Debut: A Thanksgiving MEA:

In the story Arthur's Thanksgiving, Arthur is chosen to direct the school's Thanksgiving play, but he has a hard time deciding who should play each part. In this MEA, the students will work in teams to help Arthur choose the perfect person for each part in the play. Then the students will write a letter to Arthur explaining their casting decisions and their decision making process. During the lesson, students will also have to reconsider their casting decisions and help Arthur solve the problem in the story when no one wants to dress up as the most important part in the play, the turkey!

Arthur's Perfect Pet:

In the story Arthur's Pet Business, Arthur shows his parents that he is responsible enough to deserve a pet dog and his mom gives him permission to get one. However, Arthur needs your help choosing the perfect dog. Help Arthur meet all the requirements needed to find the perfect pet for his family from the research he shares with you about the breeds they are considering, taking into consideration size, shedding, barking, friendliness, etc. Then write a justification to describe why you chose the perfect pet for Arthur and his family.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Best Babysitter:

Teams of students will use math to solve an open-ended, real-world problem to help their parent or caregiver choose the best babysitter. Students will apply mathematical skills of place value (two-digit number tens and ones) and counting to perform math calculations while analyzing data sets. This MEA will facilitate students demonstrating higher level critical thinking and problem solving during class discussions and in writing.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Blankets for Babies:

Students will choose which baby blanket a store should buy to sell, based on these factors; size, how soft it is, color, and safety. Students will rank four blankets from best to worst.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Butterfly Trail:

Students will use a realistic scenario in order to create a Butterfly Trail for their school. The students will be required to activate prior knowledge, brainstorm independently, and also collaborate within cooperative groups to create a model to explain their reasoning.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Crumbly Cookie Company:

Students will determine the best variety for a new cookie entering the market. Students will have to consider flavor, smell, appearance, and the number of cookies in the package.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

David's big problem:

In this lesson students will work collaboratively in guided groups to resolve conflicts while demonstrating respect and kindness with a focus on recognizing the characteristics of responsible citizenship. They will collect data into categories and represent the results using tally marks or pictographs.

Fairycat Bookstore:

This MEA lesson is designed for a First grade level. Students will be working in small groups to figure out what book series is best for the book store. They will vote on the best choice by using a bar graph.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Fill It Up - Piñatas!:

This MEA focuses on students' problem solving skills. After reading a story about what is in a piñata, students are asked to help a company find the best way to fill a piñata. It focuses on math skills, including counting and adding three numbers to make 20.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Flower Garden:

The students will determine which flowers are the best to plant in a flower garden. The students will receive data about the hardiness of each flower, the amount of sun and water each needs, and the number of flowers each plant will produce. Students may choose a plant that produces many flowers but may not be very hardy.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Get Up and Move!:

This is a first grade MEA that asks students to work together to help each other explore different ways to problem solve. The students are presented with a problem in which they have to choose the top three choices of sporting equipment that will help raise the most money for a move-a-thon event. They will be asked to reevaluate their original procedures, when given a second set of data.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Let's Play!:

The fundraiser was a huge success! Now students must decide the best way to spend the money to buy new playground equipment.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Noritos Chip Company:

In this first grade MEA, the students will use a given data set to help the chip company determine which new flavor of chips it should add to their line of chips. Students will analyze the data and determine how to rank the chips. Students will work in groups to determine the procedure needed to rank the chips and report the information back to the chip company.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Pete's Brand New Shoes:

Pete the Cat wants a new pair of shoes and needs the students' help selecting the right ones for him. Students will work with a team to select the best shoes for Pete. Students will use symbols to compare the costs of shoes within 100.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Pinata! Pinata!:

This is a Science lesson based on force and movement. As a plus the students will also be learning a little bit about the Hispanic culture and use of piñatas. Students will practice their math skills by reading a data table and adding tens and ones.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Pizza Party Planners:

In the story Curious George and the Pizza Party (by Rey, H.A., and Margret Rey), Curious George attends a pizza party for a friend. Now the man with the yellow hat wants to plan his own pizza party for Curious George, but he needs the students' help. Help the man with the yellow hat use the data about the different pizza companies in his area to rank the options from best to worst, considering the toppings offered, crust options, prices, and customer satisfaction ratings. Then the students will use the special promotions from each pizza company and their math skills to figure out which pizza place offers the best deals. Each team of students will write letters to the man with the yellow hat explaining how they ranked the companies and why they chose their rankings to help him choose the best pizza for George's party.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Quilt Squares:

Students will use pattern blocks to create a quilt square for the Quick Quilters Society. They will have to consider information on a data chart to help them create their squares. They will have to add up the cost to make their square, too.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Terrific Toy Company:

The Terrific Toy Company needs the help of students to sort toys into value packs. The students will use observable properties of the toys to sort them and create three example packs.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Tub Toys, Ahoy!:

Students will choose the best tub toy for a store to purchase based on several properties including floating, squirting, squeaking and safety.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Water Park Fun!:

This MEA require students to read and identify common water safety practices. Students will then review and analyze a data for a family who wishes to attend a water park with their children. After reading the passage and identifying the needs of the client as per the client letter, students will rank the water parks from best to worst and explain the procedure used.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.