LAFS.5.W.1.2Archived Standard

Write informative/explanatory texts to examine a topic and convey ideas and information clearly.
  1. Introduce a topic clearly, provide a general observation and focus, and group related information logically; include formatting (e.g., headings), illustrations, and multimedia when useful to aiding comprehension.
  2. Develop the topic with facts, definitions, concrete details, quotations, or other information and examples related to the topic.
  3. Link ideas within and across categories of information using words, phrases, and clauses (e.g., in contrast, especially).
  4. Use precise language and domain-specific vocabulary to inform about or explain the topic.
  5. Provide a concluding statement or section related to the information or explanation presented.
General Information
Subject Area: English Language Arts
Grade: 5
Strand: Writing Standards
Idea: Level 2: Basic Application of Skills & Concepts
Date Adopted or Revised: 12/10
Date of Last Rating: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved - Archived

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5012070: Grade Five Mathematics (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5008070: Health - Grade 5 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5010010: English for Speakers of Other Languages-Elementary (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (course terminated))
5010020: Basic Skills in Reading-K-2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021, 2021 and beyond (current))
5010030: Functional Basic Skills in Communications-Elementary (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5021070: Social Studies Grade 5 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
5010046: Language Arts - Grade Five (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
7712060: Access Mathematics Grade 5 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
7710016: Access Language Arts - Grade 5 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
7721016: Access Social Studies - Grade 5 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2023, 2023 and beyond)
7701045: Access Art Grade 5 (Specifically in versions: 2018 - 2019, 2019 and beyond)
5012065: Grade 4 Accelerated Mathematics (Specifically in versions: 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
7708050: Access Health Grade 5 (Specifically in versions: 2020 and beyond)
5010105: Introduction to Debate Grade 5 (Specifically in versions: 2020 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

Making It Rain:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. In this lesson, students will analyze an informational text that addresses how different types of precipitation are formed. The lesson plan includes a note-taking guide, text-dependent questions, a writing prompt, answer keys, and a writing rubric. Options to extend the lesson are also included.

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Handle with Care: Spacecraft Handles :

Students are asked to evaluate and design a procedure for ranking door handle designs for a spacecraft. They will consider several factors associated with functionality and the elements involved in the design of a spacecraft.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

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Weather Tools International:

Teams will be given the task of ranking weather tools for a weather station kit. Students will read an informative supplemental reading about the factors that influence weather so students can determine the relation to the tools that measure these factors. Once teams have ranked the tools, they will respond to the client in a letter with their choices. The client will respond by asking that ease of use be considered as a factor and will request that students respond with a second letter with a revised ranking.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

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We Learned About the Challenger:

Students will have an opportunity to read the speech President Reagan presented on the evening of the Challenger Space Shuttle explosion. Students will answer text-dependent questions individually, with partners, and in small groups and then write an expository essay.

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A Close Read of “Civil Rights on a City Bus”:

A close read of "Civil Rights on a City Bus" will engage students in a challenging text about Rosa Parks that requires them to determine the key points made in the article. Students will also have an opportunity to use context clues to define vocabulary words within the text. Upon completion of the close read activities, students will write an informative essay that provides evidence to prove each key point made by the author.

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Close Reading of the National Geographic article "Animal Farm":

In this lesson, students will complete a close reading of "Animal Farm," a nonfiction article found online at National Geographic that describes the incredible work one man accomplished as he turned a cattle ranch in Costa Rica into a national wildlife refuge. The students will conduct three close readings of the article, each time for a different purpose. The students will create vocabulary charts and find evidence in the article to answer a set of text-dependent questions. Students will then write an informative essay where they explain how the work of Jack Ewing changed this land. Sample responses are provided along with a writing response rubric.

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Close Reading: The Great Chicago Fire:

This close reading lesson will engage students in discussions that involve how two authors in different genres describe the same event. These short texts, the poem "The Great Chicago Fire" and the informational text "Chicago," will require students to analyze text, make inferences based on text evidence, and defend their understandings through discussion and close reads. Students will use context clues to determine word meaning and unfamiliar phrasing in both texts. Students will participate in partner and small group work throughout the lesson. For the summative assessment, students will write an explanatory essay about the main ideas and key details of each text, as well as analyze the similarities in how each author describes the Chicago fire. 

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Close Reading of the Article "A Well-Kept Secret":

In this lesson, students will complete a close reading of "A Well-Kept Secret," a nonfiction article found online at ReadWorks.org. The students will work to determine the meaning of selected vocabulary from the article and find evidence in the passage to answer a set of text-dependent questions. Students will also use key details to identify main ideas and summarize the article. Sample responses are provided along with a rubric for the summative assessment.

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Inferring Informational Text - Bridges:

Students will learn all about bridges and become "engineers" as they read, comprehend, and infer text to determine the kinds of bridges that need to be built for a variety of scenarios.

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Human Rights and Discrimination: Analyzing how a Narrator's Point of View Influences a Story:

Students will begin to learn about discrimination by analyzing how a narrator's or speaker's point of view can influence the way events are described in a story. Students will create a KWL chart, Venn diagram, and Character web, and then write an essay, all while working collaboratively to explore this important cultural issue.

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Space and President Kennedy: Using Close Reading and Text Dependent Questions:

Students will have an opportunity to read a portion of President Kennedy's speech to Congress about Space Exploration. Using Text Dependent Questions, students will discuss the speech with partners as well as a class and finally write a text based expository essay.

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Panther Protection 101:

Students in this MEA will use real-world problem solving skills and collaborative skills to partner with a local university in it's efforts to raise awareness to help protect and restore the Florida Panther's habitat. The Florida panther is Florida's official state animal.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

All-Star Track Runners:

Students will help a track coach determine which shoe is the best to purchase for his team. Students will be required to convert measurements initially and then rank the shoes from best to worst based on the data provided.

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Type: Lesson Plan

Water Cycle in a Sack:

In this lesson students will construct models of the water cycle, draw a diagram, and write an explanatory essay on the stages of the water cycle.

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Circuit Circus:

Students will be able to identify characteristics of electrical energy. This lesson can be completed in one 80 minute time period or over two days. Students will learn about electrical energy, circuits, conductors and insulators through video, a hands on exploration and summarizing informational text.

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A Closer Look of the Inner and Outer Planets:

In this lesson, students will research properties of the inner and outer planets in our Solar System. They will organize their research by creating a Solar System poster that displays a comparison between the planets.

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Exploring Habitats!:

If you could live anywhere in the world, where would you live? Do you think you could survive anywhere in the world or in any habitat? What types of adaptations might help you survive in your dream habitat? Many places seem great to visit, but you won't know if it's the place for you unless you know the characteristics of the habitat. This lesson will encourage your students to research habitats and adaptations that allow plants and animals to survive in their natural environments.

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Frankenchicken:

It's ALIVE! Or is it? Engage students with a hands-on look at muscles, tissues, bones, bone marrow, cartilage, ligaments, tendons and connective tissue. It is an exciting way to hook students into learning the structures promoting a better understanding of how they work. It will be a lab students will refer back to and remember! The lab takes about 1 hour; however the research and presentations can take up to a week.

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A Reading/Writing/Speaking Approach to the Ways in Which Geography Shapes How People Live – Part I:

This two-lesson study of American History (Pre-Columbian North America) examines the ways in which geography shapes how people live. Part I of the study places emphasis on reading and writing about the early Native American tribes and the ways in which their geography (climate, landforms, natural resources) played a role in how they lived (food, clothing, shelter, tools, art).

Part II of the study requires students to take the knowledge they learned in Part I and apply it to the creation of an oral multimedia project (with a visual arts piece) that depicts how they would have lived in a country of their choice based on that country's geography.

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Close Reading Exemplar: "The Making of a Scientist":

The goal of this two to three day exemplar is to give students the opportunity to use the reading and writing habits they've been practicing on a regular basis to absorb deep lessons from Richard Feynman's recollections of interactions with his father. By reading and rereading the passage closely, and focusing their reading through a series of questions and discussion about the text, students will identify how and why Feynman started to look at the world through the eyes of a scientist. When combined with writing about the passage, students will discover how much they can learn from a memoir.

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Close Reading of the Fable "The North Wind and the Sun":

This lesson will engage students in high-level discussions that involve conceptual understanding. After close readings of this short fable, "The North Wind and the Sun" by Aesop, students must complete activities that require them to think deeply, make inferences based on textual evidence, and defend their interpretation during discussions. Students will use context clues to determine word meaning and unfamiliar phrasing. Students will participate in a Socratic Seminar evaluating conceptual understandings, examining morals, and making inferences. Students will engage in student-to-student discourse and partner work throughout the lesson. For the summative assessment, students will write an explanatory text to convey understandings presented in texts and through images.

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Project

Energy Flow of a Mountain Ecosystem:

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Teaching Ideas

Stand Up! Speak Out! :

This teaching idea describes a 5th grade project that started with the guiding question, "What makes a good leader?" After conducting a survey of responses to this question, students researched a historical leader, wrote a speech from the perspective of their chosen leader, and created a conceptual portrait representing their chosen leader.

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Teaching Tolerance: Reading Advertisements:

This resource is provided by , a project of the Southern Poverty Law Center, and encourages students to look critically at advertisements.

These activities will help students:

  • learn to conceptualize advertisements as texts that can and must be critically read.
  • develop explicit strategies for reading and interpreting advertisements.
  • recognize that advertisements are constructed messages.

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Teaching Tolerance: What's for Sale:

This resource is provided by , a project of the Southern Poverty Law Center, and encourages students to look critically at advertisements.

These activities will help students:

  • define the meaning, purpose and influence of advertising.
  • think about advertising as something that can be read and interpreted, like other written and visual texts.
  • activate and communicate prior knowledge about the role advertising plays in their daily lives.

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Text Resources

What Makes it Rain?:

This informational text is intended to support reading in the content area. The text informs readers about how several types of precipitation are formed in the atmosphere, including rain, hail, freezing rain, and snow.

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Why Amazonian Butterflies Hover over Yellow-Spotted Turtles:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. The text details the intriguing relationship between turtles and butterflies in the Amazon rainforest: butterflies drink the turtles' tears to get their sodium fix! The article also explores how both organisms are affected by this relationship.

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Sleet and Freezing Rain: What's the Difference?:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. The article and graphics explain the atmospheric conditions needed to form different types of precipitation: snow, freezing rain, and sleet.

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Your Amazing Brain:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. This National Geographic article describes the amazing attributes of the human brain, comparing its features to everyday objects like a light bulb or a computer.

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Sea Horses and How They Use Their Heads:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. The article describes how the dwarf seahorse's head shape allows it to be a better predator.

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A Matter of Mixing:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. This article describes properties of items as hyrdophobic or hyrdophilic and how they work.

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The Comet that Came in from the Cold:

This resource is intended to support reading in the content area. The comet ISON, believed to originate from the frozen Oort cloud, has been studied in order to make predictions about its destiny – will it be destroyed by, or slung around, the sun?

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The Water Cycle Adventure:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. The article walks the reader through the water cycle, from the point of view of a drop of water.

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Water Cycle:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. This article discusses the steps in the water cycle.

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Restoring a Sense of Touch:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. This text explores the possibility of creating a prosthesis (artificial limb) that can feel things.

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The Bad Breath Defense:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. The article describes the ability of the hornworm caterpillar to defend itself against predators using its food source.

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Caught in the Act:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. The article discusses the study of a population's ability to adapt to the environment. The section of focus is on the cichlid population in Lake Victoria.

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Tower Of Power:

The article describes a new kind of solar energy which concentrates light waves from the sun.

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Secrets of the World's Extreme Divers:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. "Secrets of the World's Extreme Divers" explores the reason sea mammals are able to hold their breath for long periods of time.

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STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

All-Star Track Runners:

Students will help a track coach determine which shoe is the best to purchase for his team. Students will be required to convert measurements initially and then rank the shoes from best to worst based on the data provided.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Handle with Care: Spacecraft Handles :

Students are asked to evaluate and design a procedure for ranking door handle designs for a spacecraft. They will consider several factors associated with functionality and the elements involved in the design of a spacecraft.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Panther Protection 101:

Students in this MEA will use real-world problem solving skills and collaborative skills to partner with a local university in it's efforts to raise awareness to help protect and restore the Florida Panther's habitat. The Florida panther is Florida's official state animal.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Weather Tools International:

Teams will be given the task of ranking weather tools for a weather station kit. Students will read an informative supplemental reading about the factors that influence weather so students can determine the relation to the tools that measure these factors. Once teams have ranked the tools, they will respond to the client in a letter with their choices. The client will respond by asking that ease of use be considered as a factor and will request that students respond with a second letter with a revised ranking.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.