LAFS.4.W.2.4

Produce clear and coherent writing in which the development and organization are appropriate to task, purpose, and audience. (Grade-specific expectations for writing types are defined in standards 1–3 above.)
General Information
Subject Area: English Language Arts
Grade: 4
Strand: Writing Standards
Idea: Level 3: Strategic Thinking & Complex Reasoning
Date Adopted or Revised: 12/10
Date of Last Rating: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5010010: English for Speakers of Other Languages-Elementary (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (course terminated))
5010030: Functional Basic Skills in Communications-Elementary (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
5021060: Social Studies Grade 4 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond)
5010045: Language Arts - Grade Four (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
7710015: Access Language Arts - Grade 4 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022 (current), 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond)
7721015: Access Social Studies - Grade 4 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
5010104: Introduction to Debate Grade 4 (Specifically in versions: 2020 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
LAFS.4.W.2.AP.4a: Produce a clear, coherent draft (e.g., select/generate responses to form paragraph/essay) that is appropriate to the specific task, purpose and audience for use in developing a permanent product.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

Rocks:

Students will use their knowledge of minerals and the rock cycle to analyze the rocks on three available sites for a new skate park. After analyzing each rock site, they will write a one page recommendation that will explain the classification of the rock and why it is the best for option for building. In addition, they will create a product plan that contains information on the rocks, their history and their uses. Student groups will present to fellow group members then each student will evaluate the products.

Type: Lesson Plan

Best Lollipop Ever:

In this lesson, the students will learn about comparing the durability of certain types of candy (lollipops). Through various readings, discussions, and activities, the students will determine which Candy (lollipops) is the best in several categories. They will do this by analyzing a set of data with a set of criteria given to them by a client.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

It's in the Bag!:

This is a 4th grade MEA. This MEA will ask students to work in teams to help Greens R Us, a fruit and vegetables business, decide which type of shopping bag to give their customers. Students will consider factors such as renewable and nonrenewable resources, environmental impact, and sustainability. This MEA allows students to use high-level problem solving skills in a real-world application involving Earth's natural resources.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Most Famous Floridian of the 19th Century:

This MEA was designed to given students the opportunity to create a process for a client for nominating the "Most Famous Floridian of the 19th Century," given a list of criteria. After the students create their first process, a "twist" is added to cause them to modify their process. This MEA addresses MAFS, LAFS, and NGSSS Social Studies standards.

Type: Lesson Plan

Fertilizers in Florida:

Growing Green, Inc. is planning to expand their business into Florida. The client has specific criteria for selecting a good location to set up their new fertilizer manufacturing plant. This project will familiarize students with some of Florida's natural resources (with a great emphasis on phosphate) and will present students with opportunities to interpret different types of maps.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Take Time to Tile - MEA:

In this MEA, students will work in collaborative groups to solve multistep problems with whole numbers and decimals by using different mathematical operations such as addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. The students will be asked to assist a property owner, who is planning to retile his kitchen and family room floors, with purchasing the best quality tiles for the least amount of money. Students will need to read a data table, rank the tile companies from best to worst, calculate the amount of tiles needed according to the area, and determine the total cost to retile the kitchen and family room. A twist is added to the problem when one of the tile companies goes out of business, but two new companies are added. An additional twist will be that the homeowner has decided to tile his bathroom as well. The students will need to reevaluate the tile companies as well as recalculate the total costs to include tile for the bathroom.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Pioneer City MEA:

This MEA is designed so that students can create a process of choosing the "Best Pioneer City" in Florida based on certain given criteria. The students will have to reformulate their process once provided with additional criteria on which to base their model.

Type: Lesson Plan

If Animals Could Talk: Writing Fables:

In this lesson, students will analyze and discuss the characteristics and story lines of two different fables, "The Owl and The Grasshopper" and "The Town Mouse and The Country Mouse," and then write a fable of their own.

Type: Lesson Plan

Motivating Students to Write for an Authentic Audience:

In this lesson, students will brainstorm survival tips for future fourth graders and incorporate these tips into a "how-to" essay. Students will use an online tool for creating an outline, and a graphic organizer and proofreading checklist are also included to help students edit their writing. A rubric is provided in this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Close Reading of The Life and Times of the Ant:

This lesson will provide an in depth look at informational text that is heavy with graphic features and links science to reading. By the completion of the lesson, the students will have studied the key features and text structure of an informational text and explored content-specific vocabulary. They will use information provided to compare and contrast the lives of ants to the lives of humans.

Type: Lesson Plan

Birthday Balloon Planner:

Students will develop a model for choosing a balloon party planner and rank them from best to worst.

The students will be able to use prior knowledge of addition of multi-digit whole numbers, multiplication and division facts and concepts, math calculations with money and time, understanding fractions, and problem solving skills to solve a non-routine MEA (Model Eliciting Activity) that requires real-world application of mathematical skills.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Lesson Formerly Known as "Wassssuuup":

In this lesson students are actively engaged in learning about the applications of formal and informal language use in written and oral communication.

Type: Lesson Plan

Order Please!:

In this lesson, students will have an opportunity to learn about time transition words and use these transition words in their writing.

Type: Lesson Plan

Everglades Adventure:

Students will learn about text features, note taking, and informational writing using a series of short videos about the Everglades. As a final product, students will practice their expository writing by creating an informational brochure about the Everglades.

Type: Lesson Plan

"The Big Oil Spill":

What an exciting opportunity for the students to learn and become a productive individual in their community, by learning and understanding that each and everyone plays a huge part in protecting the environment. This project will instill a lifetime commitment to developing values that lead to protecting our wild life. The MEA is a realistic, real life experience that could be translated into everyday experiences.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Party Planners Wanted:

In this MEA, students will work in collaborative groups to solve multistep problems with whole numbers and decimals by using different mathematical operations such as addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. The students will be asked to assist a businessman who is planning a party for his employees. They will need to read several ads and decide which company offers the best deal in renting tables, chairs, and tablecloths for the client. They will need to take into consideration the amount of guests attending the party and the budget allowed. A twist is added to the problem when the students are asked to consider an additional ad and the fact that the guest list is now slightly larger.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Using Varied Transitions:

In this beginning lesson on using transition word and phrases, students will explore the use of varied transitions in a published book and then include varied transitions within their own short narrative writing piece.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Prepositional House:

This lesson will provide students with an opportunity and a framework in which they will be able to identify, understand, and apply their knowledge about prepositions and prepositional phrases.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Biological Nature Preserve:

This Model-Eliciting Activity (MEA) is written on a 4th grade level. In this open-ended problem, the Biological Nature Preserve MEA provides students with an engineering problem where they must work as a team to analyze data to choose the best tree to plant in the serenity garden. The students will consider the cost, shade, height, leaf color, maintenance, and growth rate to choose the best tree that not only will benefit the environment but also this nature preserve. The students will work in teams to decide on a process of how to rank these trees from "best to worst" as well as explain how they arrived at their solution using a letter format.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Power of Perception!:

During the lesson, students will listen to the story, The Frog Prince, in order to understand that someone may be wonderful on the inside even if they don't look quite as handsome or beautiful on the outside. The students are set to the task of writing a persuasive essay using critical and creative thinking as well as practicing the skills of peer editing. The students will have an opportunity to share their persuasive writings with classmates.

Type: Lesson Plan

Differentiating Instruction: Finding the Main Idea and Supporting Details in Informational Texts:

This lesson is meant to be done in small groups at the students' individual reading levels. Students will read an informational text, will identify the main idea and supporting details, and record their findings on a graphic organizer. They will use the informational text and their graphic organizer to create a summary based on the text. The students will also answer questions based on the text. As a summative assessment for the lesson, the students will repeat this activity using a different informational text and will conduct the work alone, rather than in a group.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Park:

The students are ranking the building of a new park according to the criteria that the town wants. They need to determine the total area of the space and how it is being used.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Which Bank is Consumer Friendly?:

This MEA is a student's exploration of banking. In the first task, they will create a model that will rank banks from most consumer friendly to least consumer friendly. In the second task, they will need to modify their models to address additional banks and additional criteria. Students can then test their models while researching real banks and determining their level of consumer friendliness.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Adventure Falls Bus Purchase:

The school district needs to purchase new buses to transport students. Students will be asked to rank the bus choices based on the data provided. The data provided is: price, year, new/used, and capacity (how many students the buses hold). In the twist, students will be given safety information and must decide how to change their procedure with the new information.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Tennis Lessons:

This MEA asks students to take on the job of a tennis pro and decide which factors are most important in choosing a facility to take tennis lessons. Students will perform math calculations, create a two-column table for hours and minutes, develop a procedure to rank facilities, and provide written feedback through letters to a parent whose child needs group tennis lessons and writes letters to ask for advice. They will rank their choices from "best to worst" tennis lesson facilities. Students will provide a detailed written explanation for how they decided to rank factors and their solution for rating tennis lesson facilities.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

IMAGERY THROUGH THE EYES OF THE OWL MOON BY JANE YOLEN:

This lesson incorporates the use of the book Owl Moon by Jane Yolen to help scaffold student skills by enriching their writing with descriptive words, metaphors, similes, and imagery. Teachers can use the shades of meaning within the text to help students understand the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in the story. The book is full of beautiful descriptive passages that stand as excellent exemplars of how a simple scene can be brought to life with the addition of figurative language. In the end of lesson assessment, students will create their own vivid story while writing from their own experience.

Type: Lesson Plan

Celebrity Floor Plan Frenzy:

Students will help an architect find the area of each room in a celebrity home and then determine the best location to build the home based on qualitative data about the locations.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Hotels: Where to Stay:

This MEA allows students to explore the creation of a model to rank hotels. Students are presented with the first part of the problem and the data which includes cost, meals served, pet friendly, and closeness to highway. They will determine which hotel will receive their highest recommendation. The second part of the task adds two hotels and additional data related to discounts. Students need to apply and test their model and make modifications as needed. All findings are submitted to the client in writing. Students may use this information to plan a family vacation researching which hotels they might stay in as they travel.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Cars for Sale MEA:

Students will compare multi-digit numbers to create a procedure for choosing the best car for Edward Easy to buy for his driving school. They will have to weigh quantitative and qualitative factors to determine the best car to purchase. Students will present their recommendations and the steps to the procedure they created in writing and orally.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Amazing Alice Cookies:

Students will help Amazing Alice Cookies choose the perfect chocolate chip brand to use for their cookies. Students will be given data in the form of fractions and decimals. Fourth grade students will compare decimals and order and compare fractions. Students will write a letter describing their procedure to the client.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Wake up America!:

Students explore the impact plants, animals, and humans are having on the environment - especially native plants and animals. This lesson has some interesting hands-on investigations to help students visualize the impact pollution is having on habitats. For the final project, students use their research to create a class book informing others about plants and animals that are endangered. Students also share ways people can help!

This lesson includes reading and writing activities that could be integrated into daily reading and language arts time blocks.

Type: Lesson Plan

Strategically Structured (Text Structures):

Strategically Structured presents the five text structures to fourth grade students (description, sequence, compare/contrast, cause/effect, and problem/solution). Students are able to identify key words that categorize each text structure, create their own graphic organizers and pieces of writing for each text structure, and identify examples and non-examples of each text structure. Students will be engaged with interactive technology throughout this lesson and will get plenty of opportunities to write their own non-fiction pieces using the different text structures. Fourth grade science and social studies content are presented in the text structure scenario examples.

Type: Lesson Plan

Cookies and Treats:

Fourth graders will help Cookies and Treats find cost-effective and eco-friendly packaging for its cookies. Students will organize data and compare prices using decimal notation in order to develop a procedure for choosing packaging for cookies.  Students will use multiplication and division of whole numbers to plan for how many packages to order.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Sunshine Power Company MEA:

This Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) is written at a 4th grade level. In this open-ended problem, students must consider how to rank wind companies based on factors like windiness, noise levels, and power output. In teams, students determine their procedures and write letters back to the client.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Sparkling Speeches:

Sparkling is the word! In this lesson, students will investigate transforming an exciting student-created expository into an engaging and quality speech using resources from the classroom and the school media center. Students will listen to a remarkable Martin Luther King speech provided by YouTube, confer with classmates on speech construction, and use a variety of easy to access materials (included with this lesson) during the construction of their speech.

The lesson allows for in-depth trials and experiments with expository writing and speech writing. In one exciting option, students may use a "Speech Forum" to safely practice their unique speeches in front of a small non-assessing audience of fellow students. A complete exploration and comprehension of introductions, main ideas with support details, and an engaging conclusion transformed into a student speech with a written exam are the final assessments for this memorable lesson.

Type: Lesson Plan

Pollinators:

This Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) is written at a 4th grade level. The Pollinator MEA provides students with an engineering problem in which they must work as a team to design a procedure to select the best pollinator for certain situations.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

"The Day Jimmy's Boa Ate the Wash"; Using Text Structure to formulate a Narrative:

In this lesson, students will create their own original narrative using the text structure (cause/effect) that author Trinka Hakes Nobles uses in the book The Day Jimmy's Boa Ate the Wash. The students are expected to use strong verbs and descriptive adjectives to strengthen their writing. Students will use Microsoft Word to publish their writing and share with the class. This lesson uses the gradual release model so students will receive practice at writing the narrative with teacher support as a whole class and with teacher support in small groups before writing a narrative on their own.

Type: Lesson Plan

Caution! School's a Zoo!:

This is a fun science lesson that teaches children about inherited animal behaviors through observation and direct instruction. Students then use their new skills to write a news article explaining what school might be like if teachers or students had different inherited and learned behaviors. This lesson can be integrated into reading and includes an opportunity for writing across the curriculum.

Type: Lesson Plan

Cruising for a Great Value:

This MEA allows students to explore the creation of a model to rank cruise ships. Students are presented with the first part of the problem and the data which includes cost, meals served, child care, and airfare. They will determine which ship will receive their highest recommendation. The second part of the task adds two ships and additional data related to time of the year. Students need to apply and test their model and make modifications as needed. All findings are submitted to the client in writing. Students may use this information to plan a family vacation researching which cruise ship they might stay in as they travel

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Light It Up:

In this MEA, students will work in collaborative groups to solve real-world, multi-step problems with whole numbers and decimals by using different mathematical operations such as addition, subtraction, multiplication and/or division. The students will be asked to assist a business/property owner in purchasing holiday lights for his property. They will need to read several ads and decide which product would be the best for the property. They will be provided with an office plan to calculate the perimeter of the building to then calculate how many holiday lights will need to be purchased and its total cost for each. They also need to take into consideration the owner's primary concerns. In the twist, the owner finds different holiday lights made from another material.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

New Coat of Paint:

In this MEA, students will work in collaborative groups to solve multistep problems with whole numbers and decimals by using different mathematical operations such as addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. The students will be asked to assist a property owner, who is planning to repair his new property, in purchasing the right exterior paint. They will need to read a data table, rank the paints from highest to lowest, calculate the amount of gallons needed according to the surface area, and the total cost of each paint. A twist is added to the problem when one of the paints is not available but two others are added, and also the owner wants to paint the dividing walls outside.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Teaching Ideas

Faces of the Depression:

In this teaching idea, fifth grade students learn about the Great Depression, conduct research, and read the historical fiction novel, Esperanza Rising. After conducting interviews, students write 3rd person narratives and draw portraits of the locals who lived through that time period. This project was conducted in a Senior Center in Massachusetts and can easily be translated to a classroom in Florida.

Type: Teaching Idea

What Matters to Me: In the Hearts and Minds of Elementary School Students:

This teaching idea describes a project fourth graders participated in after studying American immigration. Students wrote essays about what was important to them and created expressive self-portraits.

Type: Teaching Idea

Leaving Traces:

This teaching idea describes a fourth grade project students participated in after studying early man. Students created a magazine which included photos, drawings, text and graphics of what they researched and learned.

Type: Teaching Idea

Comics in the Classroom as an Introduction to Narrative Structure:

In this lesson, students will use a comic-strip format for pre-writing to reinforce plot structure and create their own personal narratives. Students will learn to differentiate between random or background events and events that are significant to the plot of the story. Handouts and a virtual manipulative are included in this lesson.

Type: Teaching Idea

Dolphin Word Play-SeaWorld Classroom Activity:

Students will experiment with language and word play as they create poems about dolphins.

Type: Teaching Idea

STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

"The Big Oil Spill":

What an exciting opportunity for the students to learn and become a productive individual in their community, by learning and understanding that each and everyone plays a huge part in protecting the environment. This project will instill a lifetime commitment to developing values that lead to protecting our wild life. The MEA is a realistic, real life experience that could be translated into everyday experiences.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Adventure Falls Bus Purchase:

The school district needs to purchase new buses to transport students. Students will be asked to rank the bus choices based on the data provided. The data provided is: price, year, new/used, and capacity (how many students the buses hold). In the twist, students will be given safety information and must decide how to change their procedure with the new information.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Amazing Alice Cookies:

Students will help Amazing Alice Cookies choose the perfect chocolate chip brand to use for their cookies. Students will be given data in the form of fractions and decimals. Fourth grade students will compare decimals and order and compare fractions. Students will write a letter describing their procedure to the client.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Best Lollipop Ever:

In this lesson, the students will learn about comparing the durability of certain types of candy (lollipops). Through various readings, discussions, and activities, the students will determine which Candy (lollipops) is the best in several categories. They will do this by analyzing a set of data with a set of criteria given to them by a client.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Birthday Balloon Planner:

Students will develop a model for choosing a balloon party planner and rank them from best to worst.

The students will be able to use prior knowledge of addition of multi-digit whole numbers, multiplication and division facts and concepts, math calculations with money and time, understanding fractions, and problem solving skills to solve a non-routine MEA (Model Eliciting Activity) that requires real-world application of mathematical skills.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Cars for Sale MEA:

Students will compare multi-digit numbers to create a procedure for choosing the best car for Edward Easy to buy for his driving school. They will have to weigh quantitative and qualitative factors to determine the best car to purchase. Students will present their recommendations and the steps to the procedure they created in writing and orally.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Celebrity Floor Plan Frenzy:

Students will help an architect find the area of each room in a celebrity home and then determine the best location to build the home based on qualitative data about the locations.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Cookies and Treats:

Fourth graders will help Cookies and Treats find cost-effective and eco-friendly packaging for its cookies. Students will organize data and compare prices using decimal notation in order to develop a procedure for choosing packaging for cookies.  Students will use multiplication and division of whole numbers to plan for how many packages to order.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Cruising for a Great Value:

This MEA allows students to explore the creation of a model to rank cruise ships. Students are presented with the first part of the problem and the data which includes cost, meals served, child care, and airfare. They will determine which ship will receive their highest recommendation. The second part of the task adds two ships and additional data related to time of the year. Students need to apply and test their model and make modifications as needed. All findings are submitted to the client in writing. Students may use this information to plan a family vacation researching which cruise ship they might stay in as they travel

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Fertilizers in Florida:

Growing Green, Inc. is planning to expand their business into Florida. The client has specific criteria for selecting a good location to set up their new fertilizer manufacturing plant. This project will familiarize students with some of Florida's natural resources (with a great emphasis on phosphate) and will present students with opportunities to interpret different types of maps.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Hotels: Where to Stay:

This MEA allows students to explore the creation of a model to rank hotels. Students are presented with the first part of the problem and the data which includes cost, meals served, pet friendly, and closeness to highway. They will determine which hotel will receive their highest recommendation. The second part of the task adds two hotels and additional data related to discounts. Students need to apply and test their model and make modifications as needed. All findings are submitted to the client in writing. Students may use this information to plan a family vacation researching which hotels they might stay in as they travel.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

It's in the Bag!:

This is a 4th grade MEA. This MEA will ask students to work in teams to help Greens R Us, a fruit and vegetables business, decide which type of shopping bag to give their customers. Students will consider factors such as renewable and nonrenewable resources, environmental impact, and sustainability. This MEA allows students to use high-level problem solving skills in a real-world application involving Earth's natural resources.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Light It Up:

In this MEA, students will work in collaborative groups to solve real-world, multi-step problems with whole numbers and decimals by using different mathematical operations such as addition, subtraction, multiplication and/or division. The students will be asked to assist a business/property owner in purchasing holiday lights for his property. They will need to read several ads and decide which product would be the best for the property. They will be provided with an office plan to calculate the perimeter of the building to then calculate how many holiday lights will need to be purchased and its total cost for each. They also need to take into consideration the owner's primary concerns. In the twist, the owner finds different holiday lights made from another material.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Most Famous Floridian of the 19th Century:

This MEA was designed to given students the opportunity to create a process for a client for nominating the "Most Famous Floridian of the 19th Century," given a list of criteria. After the students create their first process, a "twist" is added to cause them to modify their process. This MEA addresses MAFS, LAFS, and NGSSS Social Studies standards.

New Coat of Paint:

In this MEA, students will work in collaborative groups to solve multistep problems with whole numbers and decimals by using different mathematical operations such as addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. The students will be asked to assist a property owner, who is planning to repair his new property, in purchasing the right exterior paint. They will need to read a data table, rank the paints from highest to lowest, calculate the amount of gallons needed according to the surface area, and the total cost of each paint. A twist is added to the problem when one of the paints is not available but two others are added, and also the owner wants to paint the dividing walls outside.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Party Planners Wanted:

In this MEA, students will work in collaborative groups to solve multistep problems with whole numbers and decimals by using different mathematical operations such as addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. The students will be asked to assist a businessman who is planning a party for his employees. They will need to read several ads and decide which company offers the best deal in renting tables, chairs, and tablecloths for the client. They will need to take into consideration the amount of guests attending the party and the budget allowed. A twist is added to the problem when the students are asked to consider an additional ad and the fact that the guest list is now slightly larger.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Pioneer City MEA:

This MEA is designed so that students can create a process of choosing the "Best Pioneer City" in Florida based on certain given criteria. The students will have to reformulate their process once provided with additional criteria on which to base their model.

Pollinators:

This Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) is written at a 4th grade level. The Pollinator MEA provides students with an engineering problem in which they must work as a team to design a procedure to select the best pollinator for certain situations.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Sunshine Power Company MEA:

This Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) is written at a 4th grade level. In this open-ended problem, students must consider how to rank wind companies based on factors like windiness, noise levels, and power output. In teams, students determine their procedures and write letters back to the client.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Take Time to Tile - MEA:

In this MEA, students will work in collaborative groups to solve multistep problems with whole numbers and decimals by using different mathematical operations such as addition, subtraction, multiplication and division. The students will be asked to assist a property owner, who is planning to retile his kitchen and family room floors, with purchasing the best quality tiles for the least amount of money. Students will need to read a data table, rank the tile companies from best to worst, calculate the amount of tiles needed according to the area, and determine the total cost to retile the kitchen and family room. A twist is added to the problem when one of the tile companies goes out of business, but two new companies are added. An additional twist will be that the homeowner has decided to tile his bathroom as well. The students will need to reevaluate the tile companies as well as recalculate the total costs to include tile for the bathroom.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Tennis Lessons:

This MEA asks students to take on the job of a tennis pro and decide which factors are most important in choosing a facility to take tennis lessons. Students will perform math calculations, create a two-column table for hours and minutes, develop a procedure to rank facilities, and provide written feedback through letters to a parent whose child needs group tennis lessons and writes letters to ask for advice. They will rank their choices from "best to worst" tennis lesson facilities. Students will provide a detailed written explanation for how they decided to rank factors and their solution for rating tennis lesson facilities.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

The Biological Nature Preserve:

This Model-Eliciting Activity (MEA) is written on a 4th grade level. In this open-ended problem, the Biological Nature Preserve MEA provides students with an engineering problem where they must work as a team to analyze data to choose the best tree to plant in the serenity garden. The students will consider the cost, shade, height, leaf color, maintenance, and growth rate to choose the best tree that not only will benefit the environment but also this nature preserve. The students will work in teams to decide on a process of how to rank these trees from "best to worst" as well as explain how they arrived at their solution using a letter format.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

The Park:

The students are ranking the building of a new park according to the criteria that the town wants. They need to determine the total area of the space and how it is being used.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Which Bank is Consumer Friendly?:

This MEA is a student's exploration of banking. In the first task, they will create a model that will rank banks from most consumer friendly to least consumer friendly. In the second task, they will need to modify their models to address additional banks and additional criteria. Students can then test their models while researching real banks and determining their level of consumer friendliness.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.