LAFS.3.W.1.1Archived Standard

Write opinion pieces on topics or texts, supporting a point of view with reasons.
  1. Introduce the topic or text they are writing about, state an opinion, and create an organizational structure that lists reasons.
  2. Provide reasons that support the opinion.
  3. Use linking words and phrases (e.g., because, therefore, since, for example) to connect opinion and reasons.
  4. Provide a concluding statement or section.
General Information
Subject Area: English Language Arts
Grade: 3
Strand: Writing Standards
Idea: Level 2: Basic Application of Skills & Concepts
Date Adopted or Revised: 12/10
Date of Last Rating: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved - Archived

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5010010: English for Speakers of Other Languages-Elementary (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (course terminated))
5010020: Basic Skills in Reading-K-2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021, 2021 and beyond (current))
5010030: Functional Basic Skills in Communications-Elementary (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5021050: Social Studies Grade 3 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
5010044: Language Arts - Grade Three (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
7710014: Access Language Arts - Grade 3 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
7721014: Access Social Studies - Grade 3 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2023, 2023 and beyond)

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

Sosu's Call:

This lesson helps children understand how they can be affected by the way others view them. The story is about Sosu, an African boy with a disability. The villagers didn't think he could do anything. Sosu used a drum to call for help and save the older people and children who were trapped by a storm. This lesson plan addresses the following literacy skills: asking and answering questions about key details and unknown words in a text, referring explicitly to the text for the answers; describing characters' traits, feelings, and motivations and how their actions contribute to the events in a story; and writing an opinion piece in response to a text-based question.

Type: Lesson Plan

What is Tourette Syndrome?:

This lesson is about a nine-year-old boy s personal experiences living with Tourette syndrome and how he gains the courage to tell his classmates about it. The author is 9-year old Dylan Peters. He provides clear information about Tourette Syndrome in a way that students can easily understand. This lesson plan addresses the following literacy skills: asking and answering questions to demonstrate understanding of a story, referring explicitly to the story as the basis for the answers; distinguishing their own point of view from that of the author of a text; and writing an opinion piece in response to a text-based question.

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Close Reading: Determining the Lesson in Tops & Bottoms:

In this close reading lesson, students will read Tops & Bottoms, adapted by Janet Stevens, focusing on the lessons that the characters learn as a result of their actions throughout the text. It includes an interactive read aloud to provide support for students and provides opportunities for verbal and written response to the text as students work with partners and independently. The lesson culminates with a written response as evidence of student mastery. Teacher talk is included.

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Charlotte's Web: Chapter 1:

In this close reading lesson, students will analyze vocabulary, story elements, and characters' responses to events using Chapter 1 of E.B. White's Charlotte's Web. Students will respond to the text by writing an opinion or narrative composition.

Type: Lesson Plan

"Roar-ing" for Nonliteral Language:

In this lesson, students will analyze the song lyrics to Katy Perry's "Roar." While doing so, students will determine the meanings of phrases, specifically nonliteral language used throughout the lyrics. Students will determine the central message of the song and make a connection to their personal lives. They will complete various graphic organizers and write an opinion piece to demonstrate their understanding of the skills. This is the first lesson in a series of three lessons.

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How Long is Your Music Lesson?:

In this MEA, third graders will be required to rank musical instrument lesson packages based on the length, frequency, and quality of the lessons. Part of the task involves students figuring out the elapsed time of the lessons based on their start and stop times. They will also need to figure out the total weekly cost of the lessons based on the number of lessons offered per week.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Reading is Fun!:

In this MEA, students will work in groups to rank books using the following criteria: price, genre, number of pages, reading level and a summary provided for each book. The students must calculate the price for a class set of each book by multiplying each price by 20 students. There is a budget of $100. Students are then given a new budget and a new criteria and asked to re-evaluate their decision.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

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An Energetic Place to Live:

Sunny Land Developing is about to develop a new community in Florida. Students are needed to make suggestions for the company's choice of energy to integrate into the new homes. In this activity, students will review how people use electricity in their daily lives and learn about the differences between renewable and nonrenewable energy resources. Students will also be introduced to sound energy and how it is measured.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Having a Field Day:

In this MEA, students will rank t-shirt companies from the best price to the worst price by considering data such as purchase price, shipping fees, sizes, colors, etc. as well as notes regarding the amount of students enrolled. In the twist, students will be given information on additional requirements from the principal for specific shirt colors for each grade as well as the additional add-on of the school's logo (an elephant).

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Happy Feet!:

In this chocolately delicious lesson, your students will enjoy learning how to compare fractions and use that mathematical knowledge to create an inventory for a new local shoe store, Happy Feet Footwear. They will also write to express their opinions and provide reasons to justify their opinions.

This lesson suggests using "The Hershey's Milk Chocolate Fraction Book" to help students manipulate and compare fractions and have a great time doing so! What student wouldn't like to use chocolate to help him/her learn?

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Close Reading with The Tale of Despereaux:

In this close reading of Kate DiCamillo's story The Tale of Despereaux students will meet a variety of charming, and not so charming, characters. Students will identify and analyze the characters' feelings, actions, and motivations to determine the traits of each character and form an opinion about them. The first read of this story has students annotating the text and incorporates guided instruction. The following reads will be cooperative and independent practice with opportunities for teacher feedback. At the end of the lesson, students will make a judgment about one of the characters and support their opinion using text evidence.

Type: Lesson Plan

Determining the Message: A Close Reading of Faithful Elephants:

In this close reading lesson, students will work with the teacher and in cooperative groups to read and comprehend Faithful Elephants. Through multiple close readings, the students will determine the meaning of words using context clues, analyze key details, and determine the central message of the text.

Type: Lesson Plan

Close Reading for The Real Princess, a Fairy Tale:

This lesson will engage students in high-level discussions that involve conceptual understanding. This short text, "The Real Princess," originally told by Hans Christian Anderson, will require students to think deeply, make inferences based on text evidence and defend their understandings through discussion and close reads. Students will use context clues to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words and phrases. Students will participate in a Socratic Seminar which will evaluate their conceptual understanding of morals and inferences. Students will engage in student to student discourse and partner work throughout the lesson. For the summative assessment, students will write an opinion piece to convey their understand of the concepts presented in the text and image.

Type: Lesson Plan

Lizard Lights:

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Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

This is What I Think! Using Opinion Writing to Respond to the Text My Secret Bully by Trudy Ludwig:

For this lesson, students will read an excerpt from the text My Secret Bully by Trudy Ludwig. In response to a character's actions in the story, students will work to produce writing that takes a stance and shows the organization and structure that is characteristic of an opinion writing piece. This is the second lesson in a three part unit using the text My Secret Bully.

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Dining Dilemma!:

The students will compare different nutritional content of chicken nuggets from many restaurants. They will factor in the calories, the total fat, saturated fat, and sodium levels in the nuggets to rank the nuggets from healthiest to least healthy.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Pick a Pet:

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Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

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Kites for Education MEA:

Kites for Education is a Modeling Eliciting Activity which presents students with an engineering challenge in which they must analyze data sets and develop a procedure for ranking different kite models. The product ranked as best by the students will hypothetically be sold to customers and the profit used to purchase school textbooks and supplies for school age children impacted by Haiti's devastating earthquake.

Type: Lesson Plan

Dream Skates:

A student engineering team is asked by a wheel manufacturer to investigate and develop a plan to select the best model of roller blades.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

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Spacesuits Unlimited MEA:

In this open-ended problem, students will work in teams to determine a procedure for selecting a company from which to purchase spacesuits. Students will make decisions based on a table that includes company, cost per suit, color, durability, materials, and comfort. Students will determine the price per flight, graph the provided information, and write a letter to the client providing evidence for their decisions.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

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Who's Who?:

Students will collect evidence from nonfiction books and the internet to show the importance of a historical figure.

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Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) STEM Lesson

Physical Science Unit: Properties Lesson 20 Model Eliciting Activity: Animal Habitats:

In this MEA, students will have the opportunity to apply what they learned about physical properties to a realistic problem. Students will be asked to design a habitat for an elephant or gorilla that will be housed at the CPALMS Rehabilitation and Conservation Center. Students will need to describe the physical properties (color, shape, texture, hardness) of the features they selected for the habitat while explaining the rationale behind their design choices. In the optional twist, students will need to modify their design to accommodate a senior elephant or gorilla. 

This is a lesson in the Grade 3 Physical Science Unit on Properties. This is a themed unit of SaM-1's adventures at the CPALMS Rehabilitation and Conservation Center.  To see all the lessons in the unit please visit https://www.cpalms.org/page818.aspx .

Type: Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) STEM Lesson

Original Student Tutorials

Lesson 20 Video MEA Animal Habitats Part 2:

In this video, SaM-1 introduces a part 2 twist to the Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) challenge.  In the first video, students were asked to design a habitat for an elephant or gorilla that will be housed at the CPALMS Rehabilitation and Conservation Center. In this twist, students will need to modify their design to accommodate a senior elephant or gorilla. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Lesson 20 Video: MEA Animal Habitats:

In this video, SaM-1 introduces a Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) challenge for the students. This video provides habitat information to help the students use the knowledge they gained throughout the unit. Students are asked to design a habitat for an elephant or gorilla that will be housed at the CPALMS Rehabilitation and Conservation Center. Students will need to describe the physical properties (color, shape, texture, hardness) of the features they selected for the habitat while explaining the rationale behind their design choices.

In the optional twist, students will need to modify their design to accommodate a senior elephant or gorilla. The optional twist also has a SaM-1 video to introduce the twist challenge.

 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Bon Voyage!:

By the end of this tutorial, you will be able to state your opinion, organize your ideas, and list relevant reasons for your opinion.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

An Energetic Place to Live:

Sunny Land Developing is about to develop a new community in Florida. Students are needed to make suggestions for the company's choice of energy to integrate into the new homes. In this activity, students will review how people use electricity in their daily lives and learn about the differences between renewable and nonrenewable energy resources. Students will also be introduced to sound energy and how it is measured.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Dining Dilemma!:

The students will compare different nutritional content of chicken nuggets from many restaurants. They will factor in the calories, the total fat, saturated fat, and sodium levels in the nuggets to rank the nuggets from healthiest to least healthy.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Dream Skates:

A student engineering team is asked by a wheel manufacturer to investigate and develop a plan to select the best model of roller blades.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Happy Feet!:

In this chocolately delicious lesson, your students will enjoy learning how to compare fractions and use that mathematical knowledge to create an inventory for a new local shoe store, Happy Feet Footwear. They will also write to express their opinions and provide reasons to justify their opinions.

This lesson suggests using "The Hershey's Milk Chocolate Fraction Book" to help students manipulate and compare fractions and have a great time doing so! What student wouldn't like to use chocolate to help him/her learn?

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Having a Field Day:

In this MEA, students will rank t-shirt companies from the best price to the worst price by considering data such as purchase price, shipping fees, sizes, colors, etc. as well as notes regarding the amount of students enrolled. In the twist, students will be given information on additional requirements from the principal for specific shirt colors for each grade as well as the additional add-on of the school's logo (an elephant).

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

How Long is Your Music Lesson?:

In this MEA, third graders will be required to rank musical instrument lesson packages based on the length, frequency, and quality of the lessons. Part of the task involves students figuring out the elapsed time of the lessons based on their start and stop times. They will also need to figure out the total weekly cost of the lessons based on the number of lessons offered per week.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Kites for Education MEA:

Kites for Education is a Modeling Eliciting Activity which presents students with an engineering challenge in which they must analyze data sets and develop a procedure for ranking different kite models. The product ranked as best by the students will hypothetically be sold to customers and the profit used to purchase school textbooks and supplies for school age children impacted by Haiti's devastating earthquake.

Lizard Lights:

Students will use a real-world problem solving situation to determine the best types of light bulbs to maintain an appropriate environment for a captive lizard. 

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Pick a Pet:

In this MEA, students will rank pets from most family friendly to least family friendly by considering data such as purchase price, cost to feed, cleanliness, etc. as well as notes regarding the physical description of the pet. In the twist, students will be given information on additional pets as well as information on cleanliness and life expectancy. Students may need to make trade-offs in regards to cost to adopt, feed, and house along with life expectancy, ease of clean up, etc.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Reading is Fun!:

In this MEA, students will work in groups to rank books using the following criteria: price, genre, number of pages, reading level and a summary provided for each book. The students must calculate the price for a class set of each book by multiplying each price by 20 students. There is a budget of $100. Students are then given a new budget and a new criteria and asked to re-evaluate their decision.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Spacesuits Unlimited MEA:

In this open-ended problem, students will work in teams to determine a procedure for selecting a company from which to purchase spacesuits. Students will make decisions based on a table that includes company, cost per suit, color, durability, materials, and comfort. Students will determine the price per flight, graph the provided information, and write a letter to the client providing evidence for their decisions.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Original Student Tutorials for Language Arts - Grades K-5

Bon Voyage!:

By the end of this tutorial, you will be able to state your opinion, organize your ideas, and list relevant reasons for your opinion.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Original Student Tutorials

Lesson 20 Video MEA Animal Habitats Part 2:

In this video, SaM-1 introduces a part 2 twist to the Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) challenge.  In the first video, students were asked to design a habitat for an elephant or gorilla that will be housed at the CPALMS Rehabilitation and Conservation Center. In this twist, students will need to modify their design to accommodate a senior elephant or gorilla. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Lesson 20 Video: MEA Animal Habitats:

In this video, SaM-1 introduces a Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) challenge for the students. This video provides habitat information to help the students use the knowledge they gained throughout the unit. Students are asked to design a habitat for an elephant or gorilla that will be housed at the CPALMS Rehabilitation and Conservation Center. Students will need to describe the physical properties (color, shape, texture, hardness) of the features they selected for the habitat while explaining the rationale behind their design choices.

In the optional twist, students will need to modify their design to accommodate a senior elephant or gorilla. The optional twist also has a SaM-1 video to introduce the twist challenge.

 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Bon Voyage!:

By the end of this tutorial, you will be able to state your opinion, organize your ideas, and list relevant reasons for your opinion.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.