LAFS.4.RI.2.4

Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words or phrases in a text relevant to a grade 4 topic or subject area.
General Information
Subject Area: English Language Arts
Grade: 4
Strand: Reading Standards for Informational Text
Idea: Level 2: Basic Application of Skills & Concepts
Date Adopted or Revised: 12/10
Date of Last Rating: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved
Assessed: Yes
Test Item Specifications
  • Item Type(s): This benchmark may be assessed using: EBSR , MS , ST , MC item(s)
  • Assessed with: LAFS.4.L.3.4,LAFS.4.L.3.5
    Also assesses: LAFS.4.RF.3.3 and LAFS.4.RF.4.4

  • Assessment Limits :
    Items may ask the student to use the text to determine the meanings of academic and domain-specific words and phrases. Items may ask the student to use contextual clues or Greek and Latin affixes and roots to determine the meaning of a word. Items may ask the student to explain the meaning of a simile or metaphor in the context of the text. Items may ask the student to explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and proverbs. Items may ask the student to relate words to their antonyms and synonyms. Items should not exclusively ask the student to determine the meanings of basic, everyday words and phrases that commonly appear in spoken language.
  • Text Types :
    The items assessing these standards may be used with one or more grade-appropriate informational texts. Texts may vary in complexity.
  • Response Mechanisms :
    The Enhanced Item Descriptions section on page 3 provides a list of Response Mechanisms that may be used to assess this standard (excluding the Editing Task Choice item type). The Sample Response Mechanisms may include, but are not limited to, the examples below.
  • Task Demand and Sample Response Mechanisms :

    Task Demand

    Determine the meaning of a word or phrase by using context clues.

    Sample Response Mechanisms

    Selectable Text

    • Requires the student to select details from the text that show the meaning of a word or phrase used in the text. 
    EBSR
    • Requires the student to select a meaning of a word or phrase and then to select details from the text that support that meaning. 
    Multiselect
    • Requires the student to correctly identify multiple words or phrases that illustrate the meaning of a word in the text.
    Task Demand

    Determine the meaning of a word or phrase using grade-appropriate Greek and Latin roots or affixes.

    Sample Response Mechanisms

    Multiple Choice

    • Requires the student to select the correct meaning of a word from the text that contains a Greek or Latin root or affix.
    Task Demand

    Explain the meaning of a simile or metaphor in the context of the text.

    Sample Response Mechanisms

    Selectable Text

    • Requires the student to select words or phrases that illustrate the meaning of a simile or metaphor. 
    Multiple Choice
    • Requires the student to select an explanation of a simile or metaphor found in the text. 
    Multiselect
    • Requires the student to select multiple words or phrases that contribute to an explanation of a simile or metaphor found in the text.
    Task Demand

    Explain the meaning of common idioms, adages, and proverbs found in the text.

    Sample Response Mechanisms

    Multiple Choice

    • Requires the student to select an explanation of an idiom, adage, or proverb found in the text. 
    Multiselect
    • Requires the student to select multiple words or phrases that contribute to an explanation of an idiom, adage, or proverb found in the text.
    Task Demand

    Relate words to their antonyms and synonyms.

    Sample Response Mechanisms

    Selectable Text

    • Requires the student to select a word or words from the text that are antonyms or synonyms of a specific word from the text. 
    Multiple Choice
    • Requires the student to select an antonym or synonym of a specific word from the text. 
    Multiselect
    • Requires the student to select multiple words that function as antonyms or synonyms of a specific word from the text.

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5020050: Science - Grade Four (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
5010010: English for Speakers of Other Languages-Elementary (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (course terminated))
5010020: Basic Skills in Reading-K-2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021, 2021 and beyond (current))
5010030: Functional Basic Skills in Communications-Elementary (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
5013010: Elementary Chorus (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
5013020: Elementary Band (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
5013030: Elementary Orchestra (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
5021060: Social Studies Grade 4 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond)
5010045: Language Arts - Grade Four (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
7720050: Access Science Grade 4 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))
7710015: Access Language Arts - Grade 4 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022 (current), 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond)
7721015: Access Social Studies - Grade 4 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
5013035: Elementary Special Ensemble (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
5011040: Library Skills/Information Literacy 4 (Specifically in versions: 2016 - 2022 (current), 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond)
5010104: Introduction to Debate Grade 4 (Specifically in versions: 2020 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
LAFS.4.RI.2.AP.4a: Determine the meaning of general academic and domain-specific words and phrases in increasingly complex texts over time.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

What Did You Say Happened to the Everglades?:

In this lesson, students will conduct a close reading of an informational article about pythons in the Everglades. Students will use a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of selected academic words in context, and they will sort selected tier 3 words into categories and examine the relationships between words in a category. Students will also answer text-dependent questions about the article and identify and describe the cause/effect structure used throughout the article. Students will complete an informational paragraph about the events that are occurring in the Everglades using text evidence to support their ideas. Graphic organizers, answer keys, and a writing rubric have been provided with the lesson.

Type: Lesson Plan

How Important is the Amazon Rainforest?:

In this lesson, students will conduct a close reading of an informational article about the destruction of the Amazon rain forest. Students will use a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of selected academic words in context, and they will sort selected tier 3 words into categories and examine the relationships between words in a category. Students will also answer text-dependent questions about the article and identify and describe the cause/effect structure used throughout the article. Students will write an informational paragraph about the events that are occurring in the Amazon rain forest. Graphic organizers, answer keys, and a writing rubric have been provided with the lesson.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Tree that Saved the Day!:

In this lesson, students will conduct a close reading of an informational picture book about a community in Africa that is saved by the planting of mangrove trees. Students will use a variety of strategies to determine the meaning of selected academic words in context. Students will also answer text-dependent questions about the book and identify and describe the cause/effect structure used throughout the book. Graphic organizers, answer keys, and a writing rubric have been provided with the lesson.

Type: Lesson Plan

Close Reading of The Life and Times of the Ant:

This lesson will provide an in depth look at informational text that is heavy with graphic features and links science to reading. By the completion of the lesson, the students will have studied the key features and text structure of an informational text and explored content-specific vocabulary. They will use information provided to compare and contrast the lives of ants to the lives of humans.

Type: Lesson Plan

Shall We Rescue the Amazon?:

In this lesson, students will learn how humans are impacting the environment by reading various informational texts on the topic of saving the rain forests. Students will determine the meanings of unknown content-specific words and identify the main idea and supporting details within the text. They will write a summary of the text and respond to a prompt by writing an opinion essay.

Type: Lesson Plan

Plants: To Eat or Not to Eat:

In this lesson, students will explore the structure of plants in ways never before. Through observations about plant parts related to everyday food, students will gain a further understanding of humans and plants being interdependent. This lesson integrates Science, Reading, Writing and even some Math practices if choosing to complete the extension activities.

Type: Lesson Plan

Patrotic Pledgers:

This lesson has students defining a selection of words from the Pledge of Allegiance. After defining these words, students will identify synonyms for the selected words and rewrite the pledge in their own words. Students will then orally present their rewritten pledge to the class.

Type: Lesson Plan

Who's to Blame? Me or My Parents?:

This is an integrated science and reading lesson. This lesson is intended as a beginning of year lesson to give students the foundation in some of the practice of science and writing standards. Students will conduct an investigation on inherited traits and use evidence from a research article and their investigation to support their findings.

Type: Lesson Plan

Energetic Energy: What Do You Know?:

Using cause and effect organizer students will identify the different types of energy-light, sound, heat, electrical, and motion, recognize the cause of these energies and the effects that they have. Students will also understand the concept of using an informational text to help them understand information about a science topic.

Type: Lesson Plan

Did It Change?:

Through demonstrations and lab/investigate rotations, students will explore physical and chemical changes.

Type: Lesson Plan

CIS Wind at Work:

This lesson is using complex text to teach "close reading" strategies using the Comprehension Instructional Sequence Method (CIS). It includes a lesson plan, a National Geographic article, and a summative assessment rubric. CIS is a detailed instructional method that should be used by those who have been trained in this strategy.

Type: Lesson Plan

Chemical Changes: Burning:

This lesson demonstrates how students can apply the process of identifying main idea and supporting details to show the different ways burning can chemically change matter. The students can identify these changes and discuss the details that support these changes, which will help them further understand how burning matter is considered a chemical change.

Type: Lesson Plan

Close Reading Exemplar: "The Making of a Scientist":

The goal of this two to three day exemplar is to give students the opportunity to use the reading and writing habits they've been practicing on a regular basis to absorb deep lessons from Richard Feynman's recollections of interactions with his father. By reading and rereading the passage closely, and focusing their reading through a series of questions and discussion about the text, students will identify how and why Feynman started to look at the world through the eyes of a scientist. When combined with writing about the passage, students will discover how much they can learn from a memoir.

Type: Lesson Plan

Keep it Cool –an Engineering Design Challenge:

This Engineering Design Challenge is intended to help fourth grade students apply the concepts of the flow of heat from a hot object to a cold object and that heat flow may cause objects to change temperature. It is not intended as an initial introduction to this benchmark.

Type: Lesson Plan

Properties of Matter: Color, Hardness, Texture, Odor, and Taste:

In this lesson, students will use a compare and contrast chart (graphic organizer) to compare and contrast the different properties of matter – color, hardness, texture, odor, and taste. Students will also demonstrate the science concepts learned from reading informational text passages on the properties of matter.

Type: Lesson Plan

Recycle This!:

Students will learn about recycling renewable and nonrenewable resources while completing a model eliciting activity in which they help Sunshine School District to decide which material to start their recycling program with.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Student Center Activity

Edcite: ELA Reading Grade 4-5:

Students can practice answering reading comprehension questions with a text about online learning. With an account, students can save their work and send it to their teacher when complete.

Type: Student Center Activity

Text Resources

Green Invaders!:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. This National Geographic Kids article explains how the invasion of non-native plants is threatening native food webs.

Type: Text Resource

Metamorphosis:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. This article describes the complete and incomplete metamorphosis stages.

Type: Text Resource

Weathering:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. This article describes chemical, biological and mechanical weathering and includes causes and examples for each.

Type: Text Resource

Another Link in the Food Chain:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. The article describes how energy passes through food chains. Examples of each link in the chain and a description of its role in the food chain are given.

Type: Text Resource

Unit/Lesson Sequences

Ruby Bridges: A Simple Act of Courage:

In this unit, students will learn about the Civil Rights Movement through the perspective of Ruby Bridges, a young girl caught in the struggle for equality during this time. Vocabulary strategies, slideshows, graphic organizers, and text-based questions are all included to help students compare/contrast Ruby's world with their own.

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

Weathering and Erosion: A Comprehension Instructional Sequence (CIS) Lesson Plan:

This lesson plan follows the template for the Comprehension Instructional Sequence (CIS), developed to implement Florida Standards in English/Language Arts. This sequence scaffolds students as they read and response to complex content-area informational text. This particular lesson plan uses informational text about weathering and erosion, which ties into the 4th grade benchmark .

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

Honeybee Mystery--a Comprehension Instructional Sequence Lesson Plan:

In this lesson tied to Florida Standards for English/Language Arts, students receive support as they read a complex informational text about honeybees. The teacher facilitates a close reading and writing a response-to-text.

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

Recycle This!:

Students will learn about recycling renewable and nonrenewable resources while completing a model eliciting activity in which they help Sunshine School District to decide which material to start their recycling program with.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Student Center Activity

Edcite: ELA Reading Grade 4-5:

Students can practice answering reading comprehension questions with a text about online learning. With an account, students can save their work and send it to their teacher when complete.

Type: Student Center Activity

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.