MAFS.912.G-GPE.2.4

Use coordinates to prove simple geometric theorems algebraically. For example, prove or disprove that a figure defined by four given points in the coordinate plane is a rectangle; prove or disprove that the point (1, √3) lies on the circle centered at the origin and containing the point (0, 2).

Clarifications

Geometry - Fluency Recommendations

Fluency with the use of coordinates to establish geometric results, calculate length and angle, and use geometric representations as a modeling tool are some of the most valuable tools in mathematics and related fields.
General Information
Subject Area: Mathematics
Grade: 912
Domain-Subdomain: Geometry: Expressing Geometric Properties with Equations
Cluster: Level 2: Basic Application of Skills & Concepts
Cluster: Use coordinates to prove simple geometric theorems algebraically. (Geometry - Major Cluster) -

Clusters should not be sorted from Major to Supporting and then taught in that order. To do so would strip the coherence of the mathematical ideas and miss the opportunity to enhance the major work of the grade with the supporting clusters.

Date Adopted or Revised: 02/14
Date of Last Rating: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved
Assessed: Yes
Test Item Specifications

  • Assessment Limits :
    Items may require the student to use slope or to find the distance
    between points.

    Items may require the student to prove properties of triangles,
    properties of quadrilaterals, properties of circles, and properties of
    regular polygons.

    Items may require the student to use coordinate geometry to provide
    steps to a proof of a geometric theorem.

  • Calculator :

    Neutral

  • Clarification :
    Students will use coordinate geometry to prove simple geometric
    theorems algebraically
  • Stimulus Attributes :
    Items may be set in a real-world or mathematical context.
  • Response Attributes :
    Items may require the student to determine if the algebraic proof is
    correct.
Sample Test Items (1)
  • Test Item #: Sample Item 1
  • Question:

    One diagonal of square EFGH is shown on the coordinate grid.

    There are two highlights in the sentence to show which word or phrase may be incorrect. For each highlight, click the word of phrase that is correct.

  • Difficulty: N/A
  • Type: ETC: Editing Task Choice

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
1200400: Foundational Skills in Mathematics 9-12 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1207310: Liberal Arts Mathematics (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (course terminated))
1206300: Informal Geometry (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (course terminated))
1206310: Geometry (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1206320: Geometry Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
7912060: Access Informal Geometry (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015 (course terminated))
1206315: Geometry for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
7912065: Access Geometry (Specifically in versions: 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
MAFS.912.G-GPE.2.AP.4a: Use coordinates to prove simple geometric theorems algebraically.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Assessments

Sample 1 - High School Geometry State Interim Assessment:

This is a State Interim Assessment for 9th-12th grade.

Type: Assessment

Sample 4 - High School Geometry State Interim Assessment:

This is a State Interim Assessment for 9th-12th grades.

Type: Assessment

Sample 3 - High School Geometry State Interim Assessment:

This is a State Interim Assessment for 9th-12th grade.

Type: Assessment

Sample 2 - High School Geometry State Interim Assessment:

This is a State Interim Assessment for 9th-12th grade.

Type: Assessment

Formative Assessments

Midpoints of Sides of a Quadrilateral:

Students are asked to prove that the quadrilateral formed by connecting the midpoints of the sides of a given quadrilateral is a parallelogram.

Type: Formative Assessment

Type of Triangle:

Students are given the coordinates of three vertices of a triangle and are asked to use algebra to determine whether the triangle is scalene, isosceles, or equilateral.

Type: Formative Assessment

Diagonals of a Rectangle:

Students are given the coordinates of three of the four vertices of a rectangle and are asked to determine the coordinates of the fourth vertex and show the diagonals of the rectangle are congruent.

Type: Formative Assessment

Describe the Quadrilateral:

Students are given the coordinates of the vertices of a quadrilateral and are asked to determine whether the quadrilateral could also be a parallelogram, rhombus, rectangle, square, or trapezoid.

Type: Formative Assessment

Lesson Plans

Proof of Quadrilaterals in Coordinate Plane:

This lesson is designed to instruct students on how to identify special quadrilaterals in the coordinate plane using their knowledge of distance formula and the definitions and properties of parallelograms, rectangles, rhombuses, and squares. Task cards, with and without solution-encoded QR codes, are provided for cooperative group practice. The students will need to download a free "QR Code Reader" app onto their SmartPhones if you choose to use the cards with QR codes.

Type: Lesson Plan

Airplanes in Radar's Range:

For a given circle m and point A in a coordinate plane, students will be able to show whether this given point A lies on the circumference of the given circle m using the Pythagorean Theorem. Subsequently, this can be used to prove that an airplane lies within or outside the radar's range with a given radius of detection.

Type: Lesson Plan

Who Am I?: Quadrilaterals:

Students will use formulas they know (distance, midpoint, and slope) to classify quadrilaterals.

Type: Lesson Plan

Pondering Points Proves Puzzling Polygons:

In a 55 minute class, students use whiteboards, Think-Pair-Share questioning, listen to a quadrilateral song, and work individually and in groups to learn about and gain fluency in using the distance and slope formulas to prove specific polygon types.

Type: Lesson Plan

Proving quadrilaterals algebrically using slope and distance formula:

Working in groups, students will prove the shape of various quadrilaterals using slope, distance formula, and polygon properties. They will then justify their proofs to their classmates.

Type: Lesson Plan

Quadrilaterals and Coordinates:

In this lesson, students will use coordinates to algebraically prove that quadrilaterals are rectangles, parallelograms, and trapezoids.

Type: Lesson Plan

Proving Quadrilaterals:

This lesson provides a series of assignments for students at the Getting Started, Moving Forward, and Almost There levels of understanding for the Mathematics Formative Assessment System (MFAS) Task Describe the Quadrilateral (CPALMS Resource ID#59180). The assignments are designed to "move" students from a lower level of understanding toward a complete understanding of writing a coordinate proof involving quadrilaterals.

Type: Lesson Plan

What's the Point?:

Students will algebraically find the missing coordinates to create a specified quadrilateral using theorems that represent them, and then algebraically prove their coordinates are correct.

Note: This is not an introductory lesson for this standard.

Type: Lesson Plan

Polygon...Prove it:

While this is an introductory lesson on the standard, students will enjoy it, as they play "Speed Geo-Dating" during the Independent practice portion. Students will use algebra and coordinates to prove rectangles, rhombus, and squares. Properties of diagonals are not used in this lesson.

Type: Lesson Plan

Problem-Solving Tasks

A Midpoint Miracle:

This problem solving task gives students the opportunity to prove a fact about quadrilaterals: that if we join the midpoints of an arbitrary quadrilateral to form a new quadrilateral, then the new quadrilateral is a parallelogram, even if the original quadrilateral was not.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Unit Squares and Triangles:

This problem solving task asks students to find the area of a triangle by using unit squares and line segments.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

MFAS Formative Assessments

Describe the Quadrilateral:

Students are given the coordinates of the vertices of a quadrilateral and are asked to determine whether the quadrilateral could also be a parallelogram, rhombus, rectangle, square, or trapezoid.

Diagonals of a Rectangle:

Students are given the coordinates of three of the four vertices of a rectangle and are asked to determine the coordinates of the fourth vertex and show the diagonals of the rectangle are congruent.

Midpoints of Sides of a Quadrilateral:

Students are asked to prove that the quadrilateral formed by connecting the midpoints of the sides of a given quadrilateral is a parallelogram.

Type of Triangle:

Students are given the coordinates of three vertices of a triangle and are asked to use algebra to determine whether the triangle is scalene, isosceles, or equilateral.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Problem-Solving Tasks

A Midpoint Miracle:

This problem solving task gives students the opportunity to prove a fact about quadrilaterals: that if we join the midpoints of an arbitrary quadrilateral to form a new quadrilateral, then the new quadrilateral is a parallelogram, even if the original quadrilateral was not.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Unit Squares and Triangles:

This problem solving task asks students to find the area of a triangle by using unit squares and line segments.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Problem-Solving Tasks

A Midpoint Miracle:

This problem solving task gives students the opportunity to prove a fact about quadrilaterals: that if we join the midpoints of an arbitrary quadrilateral to form a new quadrilateral, then the new quadrilateral is a parallelogram, even if the original quadrilateral was not.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Unit Squares and Triangles:

This problem solving task asks students to find the area of a triangle by using unit squares and line segments.

Type: Problem-Solving Task