MAFS.912.F-BF.2.4

Find inverse functions.
  1. Solve an equation of the form f(x) = c for a simple function f that has an inverse and write an expression for the inverse. For example, f(x) =2 x³ or f(x) = (x+1)/(x–1) for x ≠ 1.
  2. Verify by composition that one function is the inverse of another.
  3. Read values of an inverse function from a graph or a table, given that the function has an inverse.
  4. Produce an invertible function from a non-invertible function by restricting the domain.
General Information
Subject Area: Mathematics
Grade: 912
Domain-Subdomain: Functions: Building Functions
Cluster: Level 2: Basic Application of Skills & Concepts
Cluster: Build new functions from existing functions. (Algebra 1 - Additional Cluster) (Algebra 2 - Additional Cluster) -

Clusters should not be sorted from Major to Supporting and then taught in that order. To do so would strip the coherence of the mathematical ideas and miss the opportunity to enhance the major work of the grade with the supporting clusters.

Date Adopted or Revised: 02/14
Date of Last Rating: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
1200320: Algebra 1 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1200330: Algebra 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1200340: Algebra 2 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1202340: Precalculus Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
1298310: Advanced Topics in Mathematics (formerly 129830A) (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (course terminated))
1200335: Algebra 2 for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019 (course terminated))
1201315: Analysis of Functions Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (course terminated))
7912095: Access Algebra 2 (Specifically in versions: 2016 - 2018, 2018 - 2019, 2019 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
MAFS.912.F-BF.2.AP.4a: Identify the values of an inverse function given a function modeled in a table or graph.
MAFS.912.F-BF.2.AP.4b: Write an expression for the inverse of a simple function.
MAFS.912.F-BF.2.AP.4c: Verify graphically or in tables that one function is the inverse of another.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Assessments

Sample 4 - High School Algebra 2 State Interim Assessment:

This is a State Interim Assessment for 9th-12th grade.

Type: Assessment

Sample 3 - High School Algebra 1 State Interim Assessment:

This is a State Interim Assessment for 9th-12th grades.

Type: Assessment

Lesson Plan

BIOSCOPES Summer Institute 2013 - Thermal Energy:

This lesson is designed to be part of a sequence of lessons. It follows resource 52910 "BIOSCOPES Summer Institute 2013 - Mechanical Energy" and precedes resource 52705"BIOSCOPES Summer Institute 2013 - States of Matter." This lesson uses a predict, observe, and explain approach along with inquiry based activities to enhance student understanding of thermal energy and specific heat.

Type: Lesson Plan

Problem-Solving Tasks

Your Father:

This is a simple task touching on two key points of functions. First, there is the idea that not all functions have real numbers as domain and range values. Second, the task addresses the issue of when a function admits an inverse, and the process of "restricting the domain" in order to achieve an invertible function.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

U.S. Households:

The purpose of this task is to construct and use inverse functions to model a real-life context. Students choose a linear function to model the given data, and then use the inverse function to interpolate a data point.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Temperatures in Degrees Fahrenheit and Celsius:

Temperature conversions provide a rich source of linear functions which are encountered not only in science but also in our every day lives when we travel abroad. The first part of this task provides an opportunity to construct a linear function given two input-output pairs. The second part investigates the inverse of a linear function while the third part requires reasoning about quantities and/or solving a linear equation.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Exponentials and Logarithms II:

In this task, students explore the inverse relationship between an exponential function and a logarithmic function. The task is to determine the relevant composite functions, their graphs, and the domain and range of each.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Temperature Conversions:

Unit conversion problems provide a rich source of examples both for composition of functions (when several successive conversions are required) and inverses (units can always be converted in either of two directions).

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Rainfall:

In this task, students are asked to analyze a function and its inverse when the function is given as a table of values. In addition to finding values of the inverse function from the table, they also have to explain why the given function is invertible.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Invertible or Not?:

This task illustrates several components of standard MAFS.912.F-BF.2.4.c: Find Inverse Functions. Here, instead of presenting two functions and asking the students to decide which on is invertible, students are asked to complete a table of input-output pairs for the functions in such a way that one of the functions is invertible and the other one is not.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Unit/Lesson Sequence

Direct and Inverse Variation:

"Lesson 1 of two lessons teaches students about direct variation by allowing them to explore a simulated oil spill using toilet paper tissues (to represent land) and drops of vegetable oil (to simulate a volume of oil). Lesson 2 teaches students about inverse variation by exploring the relationship between the heights of a fixed amount of water poured into cylindrical containers of different sizes as compared to the area of the containers' bases." from Insights into Algebra 1 - Annenberg Foundation.

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

Virtual Manipulative

Graphing Lines:

Allows students access to a Cartesian Coordinate System where linear equations can be graphed and details of the line and the slope can be observed.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Problem-Solving Tasks

Your Father:

This is a simple task touching on two key points of functions. First, there is the idea that not all functions have real numbers as domain and range values. Second, the task addresses the issue of when a function admits an inverse, and the process of "restricting the domain" in order to achieve an invertible function.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

U.S. Households:

The purpose of this task is to construct and use inverse functions to model a real-life context. Students choose a linear function to model the given data, and then use the inverse function to interpolate a data point.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Temperatures in Degrees Fahrenheit and Celsius:

Temperature conversions provide a rich source of linear functions which are encountered not only in science but also in our every day lives when we travel abroad. The first part of this task provides an opportunity to construct a linear function given two input-output pairs. The second part investigates the inverse of a linear function while the third part requires reasoning about quantities and/or solving a linear equation.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Exponentials and Logarithms II:

In this task, students explore the inverse relationship between an exponential function and a logarithmic function. The task is to determine the relevant composite functions, their graphs, and the domain and range of each.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Temperature Conversions:

Unit conversion problems provide a rich source of examples both for composition of functions (when several successive conversions are required) and inverses (units can always be converted in either of two directions).

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Rainfall:

In this task, students are asked to analyze a function and its inverse when the function is given as a table of values. In addition to finding values of the inverse function from the table, they also have to explain why the given function is invertible.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Invertible or Not?:

This task illustrates several components of standard MAFS.912.F-BF.2.4.c: Find Inverse Functions. Here, instead of presenting two functions and asking the students to decide which on is invertible, students are asked to complete a table of input-output pairs for the functions in such a way that one of the functions is invertible and the other one is not.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Virtual Manipulative

Graphing Lines:

Allows students access to a Cartesian Coordinate System where linear equations can be graphed and details of the line and the slope can be observed.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Problem-Solving Tasks

Your Father:

This is a simple task touching on two key points of functions. First, there is the idea that not all functions have real numbers as domain and range values. Second, the task addresses the issue of when a function admits an inverse, and the process of "restricting the domain" in order to achieve an invertible function.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

U.S. Households:

The purpose of this task is to construct and use inverse functions to model a real-life context. Students choose a linear function to model the given data, and then use the inverse function to interpolate a data point.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Temperatures in Degrees Fahrenheit and Celsius:

Temperature conversions provide a rich source of linear functions which are encountered not only in science but also in our every day lives when we travel abroad. The first part of this task provides an opportunity to construct a linear function given two input-output pairs. The second part investigates the inverse of a linear function while the third part requires reasoning about quantities and/or solving a linear equation.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Exponentials and Logarithms II:

In this task, students explore the inverse relationship between an exponential function and a logarithmic function. The task is to determine the relevant composite functions, their graphs, and the domain and range of each.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Temperature Conversions:

Unit conversion problems provide a rich source of examples both for composition of functions (when several successive conversions are required) and inverses (units can always be converted in either of two directions).

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Rainfall:

In this task, students are asked to analyze a function and its inverse when the function is given as a table of values. In addition to finding values of the inverse function from the table, they also have to explain why the given function is invertible.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Invertible or Not?:

This task illustrates several components of standard MAFS.912.F-BF.2.4.c: Find Inverse Functions. Here, instead of presenting two functions and asking the students to decide which on is invertible, students are asked to complete a table of input-output pairs for the functions in such a way that one of the functions is invertible and the other one is not.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Virtual Manipulative

Graphing Lines:

Allows students access to a Cartesian Coordinate System where linear equations can be graphed and details of the line and the slope can be observed.

Type: Virtual Manipulative