MAFS.3.MD.1.1

Tell and write time to the nearest minute and measure time intervals in minutes. Solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes, e.g., by representing the problem on a number line diagram.
General Information
Subject Area: Mathematics
Grade: 3
Domain-Subdomain: Measurement and Data
Cluster: Level 2: Basic Application of Skills & Concepts
Cluster: Solve problems involving measurement and estimation of intervals of time, liquid volumes, and masses of objects. (Major Cluster) -

Clusters should not be sorted from Major to Supporting and then taught in that order. To do so would strip the coherence of the mathematical ideas and miss the opportunity to enhance the major work of the grade with the supporting clusters.

Date Adopted or Revised: 02/14
Date of Last Rating: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved
Assessed: Yes
Test Item Specifications

  • Assessment Limits :
    Clocks may be analog or digital. Digital clocks may not be used for items that require telling or writing time in isolation.
  • Calculator :

    No

  • Context :

    Allowable

Sample Test Items (2)
  • Test Item #: Sample Item 1
  • Question:

    Alex arrives at the grocery store at 5:17 p.m. He leaves at 5:59 p.m. How many minutes was he in the grocery store?

  • Difficulty: N/A
  • Type: EE: Equation Editor

  • Test Item #: Sample Item 2
  • Question:

    Alex goes to the grocery store at the time shown.

    At what time does Alex go to the grocery store?

     

  • Difficulty: N/A
  • Type: MC: Multiple Choice

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5012050: Grade Three Mathematics (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
5015050: Physical Education - Grade 3 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
7712040: Access Mathematics Grade 3 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
7715035: Access Physical Education Grade 3 (Specifically in versions: 2018 and beyond (current))
5012055: Grade 3 Accelerated Mathematics (Specifically in versions: 2019 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
5012015: Foundational Skills in Mathematics 3-5 (Specifically in versions: 2019 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
MAFS.3.MD.1.AP.1a: Solve word problems involving the addition and subtraction of time intervals of whole hours or within an hour (whole hours: 5:00 to 8:00, within hours: 7:15 to 7:45) on a number line.
MAFS.3.MD.1.AP.1b: Determine the equivalence between the number of minutes and the number of hours (e.g., 60 minutes = 1 hour) on a number line.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Assessments

Sample 2 - Third Grade Math State Interim Assessment:

This is a State Interim Assessment for third grade.

Type: Assessment

Sample 1 - Third Grade Math State Interim Assessment:

This is a State Interim Assessment for third grade.

Type: Assessment

Educational Game

Elapsed Time:

This interactive Java applet allows the user to practice finding elapsed time using analog or digital clocks. Using the "See" mode the user advances a clock from the beginning time to the ending time and the applet calculates the elapsed time. Using the "Guess" mode, the user must calculate the elapsed time between the given beginning and ending times. Three difficulty levels allow the user to practice with hour, five minute, or single minute increments. An optional scoring feature allows the user to keep track of number correct, though this feature is optional.

Type: Educational Game

Educational Software / Tool

E-lab Elapsed Time on a Clock interactive game:

Students can practice elapsed time on this easy-to-use online math game. It also comes with a printable recording sheet for tracking progress.

Type: Educational Software / Tool

Formative Assessments

Find the Time:

Students are asked to solve two subtraction problems involving time.

Type: Formative Assessment

Telling Time:

Students determine time shown on an analog clock to the nearest minute.

Type: Formative Assessment

What Time Is It Now?:

Students are asked to solve two addition problems involving time.

Type: Formative Assessment

Time Spent:

Students determine time intervals in minutes given a starting time and an ending time on analog clocks.

Type: Formative Assessment

Image/Photograph

Clipart ETC: Clock Menu:

This website has over 2,000 illustrations of analog clocks. There are clocks with a variety of numeral fonts, and plain faces showing all possible times in one-minute increments. There are also an assortment of antique clocks, pocket watches, pendulums, hour glasses, and the interior devices of time pieces.

Type: Image/Photograph

Lesson Plans

Physical Science Unit: Water Beach Vacation Lesson 6 Condensation Experiment:

Students set up an experiment and gather data to investigate the condensation of water.

This is a lesson in the Grade 3 Physical Science Unit on Water. This is a themed unit of SaM-1's adventures while on a Beach Vacation.  To see all the lessons in the unit please visit https://www.cpalms.org/page818.aspx.

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Type: Lesson Plan

Physical Science Unit: Water Beach Vacation Lesson 4 Melting Experiment:

Students set up an experiment and gather data to investigate the melting of solid water.

This is a lesson in the Grade 3 Physical Science Unit on Water. This is a themed unit ofSaM-1's adventures while on a Beach Vacation.  To see all the lessons in the unit please visit https://www.cpalms.org/page818.aspx.

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Type: Lesson Plan

Physical Science Unit: Water Beach Vacation Lesson 2 Changes to Water: Boiling and Freezing:

Students learn water can change state of matter through the addition or removal of heat.
Students will learn the boiling and freezing points of water at standard pressure. Students
will also review how data can be used to create line graphs and these graphs can show
patterns and changes to temperature over time.

This is a lesson in the Grade 3 Physical Science Unit on Water. This is a themed unit of SaM-1's adventures while on a Beach Vacation.  To see all the lessons in the unit please visit  https://www.cpalms.org/page818.aspx.

Type: Lesson Plan

Physical Science Unit: Properties Lesson 19 Sand Temperature Lab Investigation: Graphing Data for Evidence:

Students will create line graphs from the collected data on the temperature of shaded and non-shaded sand from the previous lesson. Students will use the data and graphs as evidence to make conclusions on if the shading had an impact on sand temperature. This lesson could also be taught using Math instructional time.

This is a lesson in the Grade 3 Physical Science Unit on Properties. This is a themed unit of SaM-1's adventures at the CPALMS Rehabilitation and Conservation Center.  To see all the lessons in the unit please visit https://www.cpalms.org/page818.aspx .

Type: Lesson Plan

Physical Science Unit: Properties Lesson 18 Sand Temperature Lab Investigation: Data Collection:

Students will set up the lab investigation that they planned in the previous lesson and collect data on the temperature of shaded and non-shaded sand. This lesson could also be taught using Math instructional time. 

This is a lesson in the Grade 3 Physical Science Unit on Properties. This is a themed unit of SaM-1's adventures at the CPALMS Rehabilitation and Conservation Center.  To see all the lessons in the unit please visit https://www.cpalms.org/page818.aspx .

Type: Lesson Plan

Are we there yet? Elapsed time to the rescue!:

In this lesson students will learn how to use the "mountain strategy" to complete elapsed time word problems. This lesson incorporates hands on learning and building to make the process fun and engaging.

Type: Lesson Plan

Wow! Where Has the Time Gone? A Lesson on Elapsed Time:

The lesson is designed to help students with the concept of elapsed time through the use of T-charts and number lines. Students will be able to tell and write time to the nearest time interval in minutes, and solve word problems involving addition and subtraction of time intervals in minutes using situational word problems.

Type: Lesson Plan

How Long is Your Music Lesson?:

In this MEA, third graders will be required to rank musical instrument lesson packages based on the length, frequency, and quality of the lessons. Part of the task involves students figuring out the elapsed time of the lessons based on their start and stop times. They will also need to figure out the total weekly cost of the lessons based on the number of lessons offered per week.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Cuts In A Rush:

In this time rush to get a haircut, students will add elapsed time to find the total time spent at the hair salon and the time of departure from the salon. They must use this information determine which salon is the best for the new family in the neighborhood. Students will submit a letter to the client explaining their procedure for ranking the hair salons.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Time to Play!:

This is a 3rd grade MEA that asks the students to determine elapsed time to find the ideal day for another student to stay in and do chores.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Group Singing Lessons:

Third grade students will decide which performing arts facility their parents should choose for them to take group singing lessons at. They will apply multiplication, division, and time skills for telling time to the nearest minute and time intervals. Students will work collaboratively as a group to analyze this Model Eliciting Activity (MEA), and engage in collaborative discussion that involves higher level critical thinking. They will write argumentation letters on which performing arts facility is the best choice.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Fairies to the Rescue!:

During this activity, students will utilize reading passages and data tables to create a strategy to determine which parachute design is the best design to help the fairies solve their problem.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Scheduling a School Day: Creating your own classroom schedule.:

A group of students has been chosen to help create the classroom time schedule for the school year. The students will have to use the parameters set forth by the teacher and principal, as well as their own expertise about how they learn best, to create a schedule for the school day that includes all subjects and works around time set aside for lunch and special areas. Then the students will have to adapt the schedules they created to accommodate additional considerations by the teacher and principal. This MEA will require students to use their math skills to measure time intervals and their ELA skills to write a letter justifying and explaining the schedule they created.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Your Time Is Up!:

Time Out! In this lesson, students will learn about elapsed time. Watching two short videos, using Promethean Planet flip charts, working with number lines, and working with an online tool will all be ways that the students learn about elapsed time.

Type: Lesson Plan

Hands on the Clock:

This lesson gives students an opportunity to apply time knowledge to identify time intervals to the nearest minute.

Type: Lesson Plan

Do You Have a Minute?:

In this lesson students use an analog clock to tell time to the nearest minute. Addition word problems involving time increments of minutes are solved by students using a number line.

Type: Lesson Plan

Rock Around the Clock:

In this lesson students will broaden their understanding of time by adding and subtracting time intervals in minutes. Students will be engaged in a situational real world problem on developing a music playlist. Students will learn how to organize their thinking by using a number line.

Type: Lesson Plan

Lesson Study Resource Kit

Measurement and Data Lesson Study Resource Kit - Third Grade:

This lesson study resource kit can be used to guide and support teams of third grade teachers as they engage in lesson study focused on the academic standards in the Measurement and Data domain.

Type: Lesson Study Resource Kit

Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) STEM Lessons

Physical Science Unit: Water Beach Vacation Lesson 15 Beat the Heat MEA Part 2: Cooler Experiment:

In this MEA, students will have the opportunity to apply what they learned about describing
the changes water undergoes when it changes state through heating and cooling. This MEA
is divided into four parts. In part 1, students will develop their hypothesis and receive
information on how to set up the cooler experiment. In part 2, students will use ice to test
the coolers they designed in Beat the Heat Engineering Design Lessons. Students will take
measurements and collect data on their cooler. In part 3, students will analyze the data
they collected. Finally, in part 4 they will develop a procedure for selecting the most
effective cooler to keep water frozen the longest at the beach. In the optional twist,
students will need to take the mass of the cooler into account.

This is a lesson in the Grade 3 Physical Science Unit on Water. This is a themed unit of SaM-1's adventures while on a Beach Vacation.  To see all the lessons in the unit please visit https://www.cpalms.org/page818.aspx.

Type: Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) STEM Lesson

Physical Science Unit: Water Beach Vacation Lesson 16 Beat the Heat MEA Part 3: Analyzing Cooler Data:

In this MEA, students will have the opportunity to apply what they learned about describing
the changes water undergoes when it changes state through heating and cooling. This MEA
is divided into four parts. In part 1, students will develop their hypothesis and receive
information on how to set up the cooler experiment. In part 2, students will be asked to use
ice to test the coolers they designed in Beat the Heat Engineering Design Lessons.
Students will take measurements and collect data on their cooler. In Part 3 of this activity,
students will analyze the data they collected in Part 2 by drawing and interpreting a scaled
bar graph and line graph. Students will participate in a discussion about how to interpret the
data that was collected. Finally, in part 4 they will develop a procedure for selecting the best
cooler to keep water frozen the longest at the beach. In the optional twist, students will
need to take the mass of the cooler into account.

This is a lesson in the Grade 3 Physical Science Unit on Water. This is a themed unit of SaM-1's adventures while on a Beach Vacation.  To see all the lessons in the unit please visit https://www.cpalms.org/page818.aspx.

Type: Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) STEM Lesson

Physical Science Unit: Water Beach Vacation Lesson 17 Beat the Heat MEA Part 4: Ranking Procedure:

In this MEA, students will have the opportunity to apply what they learned about describing
the changes water undergoes when it changes state through heating and cooling. This MEA
is divided into four parts. In part 1, students will develop their hypothesis and receive
information on how to set up the cooler experiment. In part 2, students will be asked to use
ice to test the coolers they designed in Beat the Heat Engineering Design Lessons.
Students will take measurements and collect data on their cooler. In part 3, students will
analyze the data they collected. Finally, in part 4 they will develop a procedure for selecting
the best cooler to keep water frozen the longest at the beach. They will communicate their
findings and procedure via a letter to next year’s class. In the optional twist, students will
need to take the mass of the cooler into account.

This is a lesson in the Grade 3 Physical Science Unit on Water. This is a themed unit of SaM-1's adventures while on a Beach Vacation.  To see all the lessons in the unit please visit https://www.cpalms.org/page818.aspx.

Type: Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) STEM Lesson

Original Student Tutorial

Count Every Minute:

Learn to read analog and digital clocks to the nearest minute in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Tutorial

Solve elapsed time word problems using a number line:

In this Khan Academy video tutorial, explore how to solve an elapsed time word problem using a number line. Mom asks you to be home by 5:45. You know the number of minutes it takes to get home. What time do you leave?

Type: Tutorial

STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

Cuts In A Rush:

In this time rush to get a haircut, students will add elapsed time to find the total time spent at the hair salon and the time of departure from the salon. They must use this information determine which salon is the best for the new family in the neighborhood. Students will submit a letter to the client explaining their procedure for ranking the hair salons.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Fairies to the Rescue!:

During this activity, students will utilize reading passages and data tables to create a strategy to determine which parachute design is the best design to help the fairies solve their problem.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Group Singing Lessons:

Third grade students will decide which performing arts facility their parents should choose for them to take group singing lessons at. They will apply multiplication, division, and time skills for telling time to the nearest minute and time intervals. Students will work collaboratively as a group to analyze this Model Eliciting Activity (MEA), and engage in collaborative discussion that involves higher level critical thinking. They will write argumentation letters on which performing arts facility is the best choice.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

How Long is Your Music Lesson?:

In this MEA, third graders will be required to rank musical instrument lesson packages based on the length, frequency, and quality of the lessons. Part of the task involves students figuring out the elapsed time of the lessons based on their start and stop times. They will also need to figure out the total weekly cost of the lessons based on the number of lessons offered per week.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Scheduling a School Day: Creating your own classroom schedule.:

A group of students has been chosen to help create the classroom time schedule for the school year. The students will have to use the parameters set forth by the teacher and principal, as well as their own expertise about how they learn best, to create a schedule for the school day that includes all subjects and works around time set aside for lunch and special areas. Then the students will have to adapt the schedules they created to accommodate additional considerations by the teacher and principal. This MEA will require students to use their math skills to measure time intervals and their ELA skills to write a letter justifying and explaining the schedule they created.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Time to Play!:

This is a 3rd grade MEA that asks the students to determine elapsed time to find the ideal day for another student to stay in and do chores.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

MFAS Formative Assessments

Find the Time:

Students are asked to solve two subtraction problems involving time.

Telling Time:

Students determine time shown on an analog clock to the nearest minute.

Time Spent:

Students determine time intervals in minutes given a starting time and an ending time on analog clocks.

What Time Is It Now?:

Students are asked to solve two addition problems involving time.

Original Student Tutorials Mathematics - Grades K-5

Count Every Minute:

Learn to read analog and digital clocks to the nearest minute in this interactive tutorial.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Original Student Tutorial

Count Every Minute:

Learn to read analog and digital clocks to the nearest minute in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Educational Game

Elapsed Time:

This interactive Java applet allows the user to practice finding elapsed time using analog or digital clocks. Using the "See" mode the user advances a clock from the beginning time to the ending time and the applet calculates the elapsed time. Using the "Guess" mode, the user must calculate the elapsed time between the given beginning and ending times. Three difficulty levels allow the user to practice with hour, five minute, or single minute increments. An optional scoring feature allows the user to keep track of number correct, though this feature is optional.

Type: Educational Game

Educational Software / Tool

E-lab Elapsed Time on a Clock interactive game:

Students can practice elapsed time on this easy-to-use online math game. It also comes with a printable recording sheet for tracking progress.

Type: Educational Software / Tool

Tutorial

Solve elapsed time word problems using a number line:

In this Khan Academy video tutorial, explore how to solve an elapsed time word problem using a number line. Mom asks you to be home by 5:45. You know the number of minutes it takes to get home. What time do you leave?

Type: Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Tutorial

Solve elapsed time word problems using a number line:

In this Khan Academy video tutorial, explore how to solve an elapsed time word problem using a number line. Mom asks you to be home by 5:45. You know the number of minutes it takes to get home. What time do you leave?

Type: Tutorial