SS.912.A.5.10

Analyze support for and resistance to civil rights for women, African Americans, Native Americans, and other minorities.

Clarifications

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 35-36. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

General Information
Subject Area: Social Studies
Grade: 912
Strand: American History
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
2100320: United States History Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2100340: African-American History (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond)
2100350: Florida History (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond)
2100380: Visions and Their Pursuits:An American Tradition-U.S.History to 1920 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond)
2100390: Visions and Countervisions: Europe, the U.S. and the World from 1848 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018 (course terminated))
2100470: Visions & Their Pursuits:An AmerTrad-U.S. Hist to 1920 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond)
2100480: Visions and Countervisions: Europe, U.S. and the World from 1848 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2104340: Women's Studies (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond)
2104600: Multicultural Studies (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond)
2100310: United States History (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
7921025: Access United States History (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))
2100315: United States History for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2100335: African-American History (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond)
2100336: African-American History Honors (Specifically in versions: 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond)
2100345: Great Men and Women of Color Who Shaped World History (Specifically in versions: 2017 - 2022 (current), 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond)
2104310: Examining the African American Experience in the 20th Century (Specifically in versions: 2017 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2100355: History and Contributions of Haiti in a Global Context (Specifically in versions: 2020 - 2022 (current), 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond)

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
SS.912.A.5.In.j: Identify reasons why there was support for and resistance to civil rights for women, African Americans, Native Americans, and other minorities.
SS.912.A.5.Su.j: Recognize a reason why there was support for and resistance to civil rights for women, African Americans, Native Americans, and other minorities.
SS.912.A.5.Pa.j: Recognize that groups may fear people who are different.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

Reading Like a Historian: New Deal SAC:

In this lesson, designed to follow a more general study of the New Deal, students analyze primary and secondary source documents and engage in a Structured Academic Controversy in an effort to answer the central historical question: Was the New Deal a success or a failure? Students receive 7 documents, including a "fireside chat" by FDR, an oral interview, a speech by a WPA representative, unemployment statistics, and song lyrics by the Carter Family. Students then divide into groups of 4 and into pairs within each group to analyze the documents using a graphic organizer. Each pair presents the argument to the other that the New Deal was either (Pair A) successful or (Pair B) a failure. Only at the end can students abandon their previous positions, reach consensus in writing as a group, and defend that view in a final class discussion.

Type: Lesson Plan

Reading Like a Historian: Anti-Suffragists:

In this lesson, students analyze primary source documents in an effort to answer the central historical question: Why did people, including women, oppose women's suffrage? It is recommended (but not essential) that the teacher begin by screening some of the HBO film Iron Jawed Angels to start a discussion about the motives of anti-suffragists. In groups, students then analyze 3 documents: 1) an excerpt from Molly Seawell's anti-suffragist book, 2) an anti-suffrage newspaper article, and 3) a speech by Tennessee Congressman John Moon. For each, students answer questions on a graphic organizer. In a final class discussion, students discuss the validity of anti-suffragists' motives, relate them to the film, and discuss what other sources they might want to read for further corroboration and contextualization.

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorials

The Era of Jim Crow and the Nadir of Race Relations: Part 2 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the era of Jim Crow segregation and the larger context within which it flourished, the "Nadir" of American race relations.

CLICK HERE to open Part 1.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Era of Jim Crow and the Nadir of Race Relations: Part 1 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the era of Jim Crow segregation and the larger context within which it flourished, the "Nadir" of American race relations.

CLICK HERE to open Part 2. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Text Resource

Who Stole Helen Keller?:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the Social Studies content area. It is most appropriate for 9th-10th grade students enrolled in a U.S. History class.

This essay is a reevaluation of the life and reputation of Helen Keller, especially as it is commonly (mis)represented in textbooks and biographies for young readers. The author argues that Keller should be remembered for far more than being courageous, as she was also a "defiant rebel" and a radical.

Type: Text Resource

Tutorial

Safe for Democracy:

In this webisode brought to you by PBS, you will explore key events that took place in American history from 1903-1927. Topics include the Wright Brothers, World War I, women's suffrage, Prohibition, jazz, Hollywood in the 1920s, and Charles Lindbergh. In this resource you can examine primary source documents and photographs, a timeline and glossary, take a quiz, and explore additional resources. Enjoy this journey into American history!

Type: Tutorial

Original Student Tutorials Social Studies - U.S. History - Grades 9-12

The Era of Jim Crow and the Nadir of Race Relations: Part 1 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the era of Jim Crow segregation and the larger context within which it flourished, the "Nadir" of American race relations.

CLICK HERE to open Part 2. 

The Era of Jim Crow and the Nadir of Race Relations: Part 2 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the era of Jim Crow segregation and the larger context within which it flourished, the "Nadir" of American race relations.

CLICK HERE to open Part 1.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Original Student Tutorials

The Era of Jim Crow and the Nadir of Race Relations: Part 2 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the era of Jim Crow segregation and the larger context within which it flourished, the "Nadir" of American race relations.

CLICK HERE to open Part 1.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Era of Jim Crow and the Nadir of Race Relations: Part 1 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the era of Jim Crow segregation and the larger context within which it flourished, the "Nadir" of American race relations.

CLICK HERE to open Part 2. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Tutorial

Safe for Democracy:

In this webisode brought to you by PBS, you will explore key events that took place in American history from 1903-1927. Topics include the Wright Brothers, World War I, women's suffrage, Prohibition, jazz, Hollywood in the 1920s, and Charles Lindbergh. In this resource you can examine primary source documents and photographs, a timeline and glossary, take a quiz, and explore additional resources. Enjoy this journey into American history!

Type: Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.