SS.912.A.6.4

Examine efforts to expand or contract rights for various populations during World War II.

Clarifications

Examples may include, but are not limited to, women, African Americans, German Americans, Japanese Americans and their internment, Native Americans, Hispanic Americans, Italian Americans.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 40-42. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.
General Information
Subject Area: Social Studies
Grade: 912
Strand: American History
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
2100320: United States History Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2100390: Visions and Countervisions: Europe, the U.S. and the World from 1848 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018 (course terminated))
2100480: Visions and Countervisions: Europe, U.S. and the World from 1848 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2100310: United States History (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
7921025: Access United States History (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))
2100315: United States History for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2100355: History and Contributions of Haiti in a Global Context (Specifically in versions: 2020 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
SS.912.A.6.In.d: Identify actions related to rights for groups during World War II, such as women, African Americans, German Americans, Japanese Americans, Native Americans, Hispanic Americans, or Italian Americans.
SS.912.A.6.Su.d: Recognize an action related to rights for groups during World War II, such as women, African Americans, German Americans, Japanese Americans, Native Americans, Hispanic Americans, or Italian Americans.
SS.912.A.6.Pa.d: Recognize that groups may be treated differently during a war.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Assessment

Quiz: The Second World War:

Test your knowledge of World War II with this 12-question multiple choice quiz provided by Khan Academy. Good luck!

Type: Assessment

Lesson Plans

Japanese American Internment: Evaluating Primary Sources:

This web resource from the Library of Congress supports student use of primary sources to understand the Japanese American experience of internment during World War II. The resource includes graphic organizers for students to use online or through printed copies, and primary source photos and interviews along with procedures for teaching the lesson.

Type: Lesson Plan

Picturing World Wars: The Great War & The Greatest Generation at War:

This 3-day lesson focuses on helping students analyze propaganda posters from both world wars to better understand how the U.S. government used propaganda to acquire civilian support. Students will analyze the images and phrases used in the posters, the purpose for each poster, any biases exhibited, and even generate questions about each poster that can be used for additional research. Through analysis of the posters students will be introduced to some of the challenges America faced by going to war. For the end of lesson assessment, students will write an explanatory essay about the government's use of propaganda in these wars. The posters, graphic organizers, answer keys, and a rubric to assess student writing have been included with the lesson.

Type: Lesson Plan

Reading Like a Historian: Japanese Internment:

In this lesson, students analyze primary source documents in an effort to answer the central historical question: Why were Japanese-Americans interned during World War II? The teacher first distributes a timeline, which the class reviews together. Students then view a government-made newsreel from 1942 explaining the rationale for internment. This is followed by 4 more documents, including the "Munson Report," an excerpt from the Supreme Court's decision in U.S. v Korematsu, and the 1983 report of the Commission on Wartime Relocation and Internment of Civilians. For each, students answer guiding questions and formulate a hypothesis: according to the document, why was internment necessary? A final class discussion has students determine which document(s) best explain what occurred.

Type: Lesson Plan

Reading Like a Historian: Zoot Suit Riots:

In this lesson, students analyze primary source documents in an effort to answer the central historical question: What caused the Zoot Suit Riots? The teacher first provides background information on the incident and then the class looks at their textbook account and answers brief questions. Students then form pairs and analyze 2 documents: 1) a Los Angeles Daily News account of the riots and 2) a letter from the Committee for the Defense of Mexican American Youth, addressed to U.S. Vice President Wallace. For both, students answer guiding questions on a graphic organizer. A final class discussion contextualizes and corroborates the documents: Is one more reliable? What caused the riots?

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorial

The War at Home: World War II Poster Propaganda:

In this interactive tutorial, you'll analyze dozens of World War II propaganda posters in order to understand how Americans on the home front experienced the war years. The U.S. government commissioned propaganda to convince Americans to support the war in a variety of ways. You'll learn how these posters reveal U.S. domestic policy during the 1940s, as well as how the government tried to expand the involvement of different groups of Americans, including women and minorities, during WWII.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Text Resource

Supreme Court Landmark Case: Korematsu v. United States (1944):

Learn more about the 1944 landmark Supreme Court decision Korematsu v. U.S. In this case, the Supreme Court considered the issue of domestic internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. The Court's ruling remains one of its most controversial decisions ever.

Type: Text Resource

Tutorials

Crash Course U.S. History: World War II - Part 2:

In this tutorial video, you'll take a whirlwind journey through the changes Americans experienced during World War II. During the war years, the roles of women and African-Americans changed drastically, and the government and economy greatly expanded. America exited the war in its new position as the world's leading superpower. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. History!

Type: Tutorial

Korematsu and Civil Liberties:

In this tutorial, you will view a video that explores the landmark Supreme Court case Korematsu v. U.S. (1944). This documentary examines one of the most controversial executive orders in American history and the constitutionality of such domestic policies. Enjoy taking this journey through American history and examining the constitutional rights that our Supreme Court weighs in its decisions!

Type: Tutorial

Original Student Tutorials Social Studies - U.S. History - Grades 9-12

The War at Home: World War II Poster Propaganda:

In this interactive tutorial, you'll analyze dozens of World War II propaganda posters in order to understand how Americans on the home front experienced the war years. The U.S. government commissioned propaganda to convince Americans to support the war in a variety of ways. You'll learn how these posters reveal U.S. domestic policy during the 1940s, as well as how the government tried to expand the involvement of different groups of Americans, including women and minorities, during WWII.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Original Student Tutorial

The War at Home: World War II Poster Propaganda:

In this interactive tutorial, you'll analyze dozens of World War II propaganda posters in order to understand how Americans on the home front experienced the war years. The U.S. government commissioned propaganda to convince Americans to support the war in a variety of ways. You'll learn how these posters reveal U.S. domestic policy during the 1940s, as well as how the government tried to expand the involvement of different groups of Americans, including women and minorities, during WWII.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Assessment

Quiz: The Second World War:

Test your knowledge of World War II with this 12-question multiple choice quiz provided by Khan Academy. Good luck!

Type: Assessment

Text Resource

Supreme Court Landmark Case: Korematsu v. United States (1944):

Learn more about the 1944 landmark Supreme Court decision Korematsu v. U.S. In this case, the Supreme Court considered the issue of domestic internment of Japanese Americans during World War II. The Court's ruling remains one of its most controversial decisions ever.

Type: Text Resource

Tutorials

Crash Course U.S. History: World War II - Part 2:

In this tutorial video, you'll take a whirlwind journey through the changes Americans experienced during World War II. During the war years, the roles of women and African-Americans changed drastically, and the government and economy greatly expanded. America exited the war in its new position as the world's leading superpower. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. History!

Type: Tutorial

Korematsu and Civil Liberties:

In this tutorial, you will view a video that explores the landmark Supreme Court case Korematsu v. U.S. (1944). This documentary examines one of the most controversial executive orders in American history and the constitutionality of such domestic policies. Enjoy taking this journey through American history and examining the constitutional rights that our Supreme Court weighs in its decisions!

Type: Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.