SS.912.A.3.11

Analyze the impact of political machines in United States cities in the late 19th and early 20th centuries.

Clarifications

Examples may include, but are not limited to, Boss Tweed, Tammany Hall, George Washington Plunkitt, Washington Gladden, Thomas Nast.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications page 22. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

General Information
Subject Area: Social Studies
Grade: 912
Strand: American History
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
2100320: United States History Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2100380: Visions and Their Pursuits:An American Tradition-U.S.History to 1920 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
2100390: Visions and Countervisions: Europe, the U.S. and the World from 1848 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018 (course terminated))
2100470: Visions & Their Pursuits:An AmerTrad-U.S. Hist to 1920 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
2100480: Visions and Countervisions: Europe, U.S. and the World from 1848 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2104600: Multicultural Studies (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
2100310: United States History (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
7921025: Access United States History (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond)
2100315: United States History for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
SS.912.A.3.In.k: Identify ways powerful groups (political machines) in United States cities controlled the government, such as having enough votes to maintain control of the city and giving jobs or contracts only to people who supported them.
SS.912.A.3.Su.k: Recognize that powerful groups in United States cities controlled the government and gave favors to people who supported them.
SS.912.A.3.Pa.k: Recognize that powerful groups have a strong influence on government.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plan

Reading Like a Historian: Political Bosses:

In this lesson, students analyze primary sources in an effort to answer the central historical question: Were political bosses corrupt? The teacher begins by explaining progressives' complaints about political machines and graft and then shows a political cartoon criticizing Tammany Hall. Students then read and analyze 2 documents: 1) a book excerpt by muckraker Lincoln Steffens, and 2) a "talk" by political boss George Plunkitt. For each, they answer guiding questions on a graphic organizer (the teacher models this extensively with the first document in the lesson). For HW, students write a dialogue between the 2 writers in which Steffens tries to convince Plunkitt to practice honest government.

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorial

Coming to America: The Era of Mass Immigration:

In this interactive tutorial, learn about the era of mass immigration from 1865 to 1914, when as many as 25 million immigrants entered the United States, many of them through Ellis Island.  You'll learn where immigrants came from, why they emigrated, how they adjusted to life in the U.S., and you'll compare the experiences of European and Asian immigrants.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Tutorial

Crash Course U.S. History: Gilded Age Politics:

In this tutorial video, you will take a whirlwind journey through the Gilded Age, a period in American history where "politics were marked by a number of phenomenons, most of them having to do with corruption." These events led to populism and eventually to new legislation that regulated government and political corruption. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. history!

Type: Tutorial

Original Student Tutorials Social Studies - U.S. History - Grades 9-12

Coming to America: The Era of Mass Immigration:

In this interactive tutorial, learn about the era of mass immigration from 1865 to 1914, when as many as 25 million immigrants entered the United States, many of them through Ellis Island.  You'll learn where immigrants came from, why they emigrated, how they adjusted to life in the U.S., and you'll compare the experiences of European and Asian immigrants.  

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Original Student Tutorial

Coming to America: The Era of Mass Immigration:

In this interactive tutorial, learn about the era of mass immigration from 1865 to 1914, when as many as 25 million immigrants entered the United States, many of them through Ellis Island.  You'll learn where immigrants came from, why they emigrated, how they adjusted to life in the U.S., and you'll compare the experiences of European and Asian immigrants.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Tutorial

Crash Course U.S. History: Gilded Age Politics:

In this tutorial video, you will take a whirlwind journey through the Gilded Age, a period in American history where "politics were marked by a number of phenomenons, most of them having to do with corruption." These events led to populism and eventually to new legislation that regulated government and political corruption. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. history!

Type: Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.