SS.5.A.5.1

Identify and explain significant events leading up to the American Revolution.

Remarks

Examples may include, but are not limited to, the French and Indian War, the Stamp Act, the Townshend Acts, the Boston Massacre, the Boston Tea Party, the Coercive Acts, the Powder Alarms.
General Information
Subject Area: Social Studies
Grade: 5
Strand: American History
Date Adopted or Revised: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5021070: Social Studies Grade 5 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
7721016: Access Social Studies - Grade 5 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
SS.5.A.5.AP.1: Identify events that led up to the American Revolution.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

The Lead Up to the American Revolution:

In this lesson plan, students will learn about some of the most influential events that led to the American Revolution. They will read around the room on posters with important information as they fill out their outline.

Type: Lesson Plan

Declaration of Independence thru the Eyes of a Child:

In this lesson plan, students will be able to break down the Declaration of Independence and understand the reasons colonists needed to break away from England and the main reasons leading up to the American Revolution.

Type: Lesson Plan

Let's Connect - Declaration of Independence and Events leading up to it:

In this lesson plan, students will learn about important events leading up to the writing of the Declaration of Independence and then make the connection between those events and the grievances found in the Declaration of Independence. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Aaron and Alexander: Lesson 1: Revolutionary War:

Students will read background information about the Revolutionary War. While they are reading, they will learn about the Stamp Act and Townshend Acts. In addition, the students will complete a jigsaw activity to find relevant details that support the central idea of the text.  To end the lesson, students will write a summary, using the central idea and relevant details from the passage about the Revolutionary War.

This is the first lesson to use in the Aaron and Alexander text unit. This lesson should be taught before reading the book.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Robot Dogs and the Declaration of Independence:

In this lesson plan, students will recognize that the Declaration of Independence affirms that every American has certain unalienable rights. Students will identify different sections, principles, and grievances in the Declaration and will analyze why the assertion of these rights is fundamental to successful governance.

Type: Lesson Plan

A "Revolutionary" Approach to Learning History:

Students will research causes leading up to the Revolutionary War and their specific effects. They will use various informational text resources to research a particular central event during this time period and place key points into a cause and effect graphic organizer. Working in small groups, they will compose a reader's theatre script depicting what they gathered in their research. They will rehearse and present their reader's theatre to their classmates.

Type: Lesson Plan

Student Resources

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Parent Resources

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