SS.4.A.6.3

Describe the contributions of significant individuals to Florida.

Clarifications

Examples may include, but are not limited to, John Gorrie, Henry Flagler, Henry Plant, Lue Gim Gong, Vincente Martinez Ybor, Julia Tuttle, Mary McLeod Bethune, Thomas Alva Edison, James Weldon Johnson, Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings.
General Information
Subject Area: Social Studies
Grade: 4
Strand: American History
Date Adopted or Revised: 02/14
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5021060: Social Studies Grade 4 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond)
7721015: Access Social Studies - Grade 4 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
SS.4.A.6.In.c: Identify the contributions of significant individuals to Florida, such as Henry Flagler, Thomas Alva Edison, and Mary McLeod Bethune.
SS.4.A.6.Su.c: Recognize the contributions of a significant individual to Florida, such as Henry Flagler, Thomas Alva Edison, or Mary McLeod Bethune.
SS.4.A.6.Pa.c: Recognize that many people made contributions to Florida.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

Railroads Change Florida: Henry Flagler in Florida:

Henry Flagler was the founder of what became the Florida East Coast Railway. During the 1880s and 1890s, Henry Flagler expanded train lines through Jacksonville and down the East coast to Miami.

Henry Flagler began the Oversea Railway in 1906 to connect Miami to Key West. This ambitious and innovative project required money, earth-moving, man-hours, and miles of bridges. In this lesson students analyze a letter from Henry Flagler to learn about about Flagler and his contributions to Florida.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Cigar Industry Changes Florida: Photo Analysis: The Lector Reading to Workers:

The cigar industry prospered in Florida during the early decades of the 20th century. A combination of factors caused the industry to decline, however, as time moved forward. Conflicts between organized labor and factory managers slowed production, while new machines were able to turn out cigars much faster and cheaper than the hand-rolling method. Demand for fine cigars decreased during the Great Depression, and by the end of World War II enough cigar factories had closed to make the industry less attractive for returning veterans. In this lesson students analyze and write from related primary source documents.

Type: Lesson Plan

Florida During the Spanish-American War of 1898: The Rough Riders in Tampa:

The Rough Riders went to Tampa at the end of May. On June 13, they left Tampa to fight in Cuba. Two years after the end of the war, Roosevelt went on to become the 26th president of the United States. In this lesson students analyze photographs to learn about the Rough Riders in Florida.

Type: Lesson Plan

Mary McLeod Bethune: Photographs of Mary McLeod Bethune and Her School:

Students will use photographs that depict different aspects of the Daytona Normal and Industrial School. Students will use prior knowledge to describe what they believe a day at the Daytona Normal and Industrial School would look like. Students write using evidence from the photographs.

Type: Lesson Plan

Mary McLeod Bethune: Primary and Secondary Sources:

In this lesson, students will examine documents and decide which are primary sources and which are secondary sources. This lesson is intended to give students an introduction to the concept of primary versus secondary sources and to prepare them for future study using more complex documents.

The documents referenced in this lesson plan are from the Daniel M. Williams Papers, held by the State Archives of Florida. Williams collected various documents and photographs in order to write a biography of Mary McLeod Bethune.

Type: Lesson Plan

Most Famous Floridian of the 19th Century:

This MEA was designed to given students the opportunity to create a process for a client for nominating the "Most Famous Floridian of the 19th Century," given a list of criteria. After the students create their first process, a "twist" is added to cause them to modify their process. This MEA addresses MAFS, LAFS, and NGSSS Social Studies standards.

Type: Lesson Plan

STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

Most Famous Floridian of the 19th Century:

This MEA was designed to given students the opportunity to create a process for a client for nominating the "Most Famous Floridian of the 19th Century," given a list of criteria. After the students create their first process, a "twist" is added to cause them to modify their process. This MEA addresses MAFS, LAFS, and NGSSS Social Studies standards.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.