SC.912.L.14.7

Relate the structure of each of the major plant organs and tissues to physiological processes.
General Information
Subject Area: Science
Grade: 912
Body of Knowledge: Life Science
Idea: Level 2: Basic Application of Skills & Concepts
Standard: Organization and Development of Living Organisms -

A. Cells have characteristic structures and functions that make them distinctive.

B. Processes in a cell can be classified broadly as growth, maintenance, reproduction, and homeostasis.

C. Life can be organized in a functional and structural hierarchy ranging from cells to the biosphere.

D. Most multicellular organisms are composed of organ systems whose structures reflect their particular function.

Date Adopted or Revised: 02/08
Date of Last Rating: 05/08
Status: State Board Approved
Assessed: Yes
Test Item Specifications

  • Clarification :
    Students will explain how the structures of plant tissues and organs are directly related to their roles in physiological processes.
  • Content Limits :

    Items will assess the function of plant tissues and organs in the context of physiological processes.

    Items assessing plant organs are limited to roots, stems, leaves, flowers, fruits, and cones.

    Items referring to physiological processes are limited to photosynthesis, cellular respiration, transpiration, and reproduction.

    Items assessing plant tissues are limited to meristematic, ground, dermal, and vascular tissues.

    Items referring to plant structures are limited to cambium, guard cells, phloem, seed, stomata, and xylem.

    Items will not address or assess mitosis or meiosis

  • Stimulus Attributes :
    None specified
  • Response Attributes :
    None specified
  • Prior Knowledge :
    Items may require the student to apply scientific knowledge described in the NGSSS from lower grades. This benchmark requires prerequisite knowledge of SC.6.L.14.1 and SC.6.L.14.4.
Sample Test Items (1)
  • Test Item #: Sample Item 1
  • Question: Terrestrial plants have stomata on the surface of their leaves. A single stoma is surrounded by two guard cells that change shape in response to environmental factors and open or close the stoma. Which of the following best explains how the structure of the leaf is used in processes that occur in the plant?
  • Difficulty: N/A
  • Type: MC: Multiple Choice

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
2000310: Biology 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2000320: Biology 1 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2000430: Biology Technology (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
3027020: Biotechnology 2 (Specifically in versions: 2015 and beyond (current))
2000370: Botany (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2002400: Integrated Science 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2002410: Integrated Science 1 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2002430: Integrated Science 2 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2000800: Florida's Preinternational Baccalaureate Biology 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
7920015: Access Biology 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))
7920025: Access Integrated Science 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))
2000315: Biology 1 for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2002405: Integrated Science 1 for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2020 (course terminated))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
SC.912.L.14.In.5: Describe the general processes of food production, support, water transport, and reproduction in the major parts of plants.
SC.912.L.14.Su.4: Relate parts of plants, such as leaf, stem, root, seed, and flower, to the functions of food production, support, water transport, and reproduction.
SC.912.L.14.Pa.4: Recognize major plant parts, such as root, stem, leaf, and flower.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

Plant Structures Lab Stations:

This lesson introduces students to a variety of different types of plants and plant structures. Students will work cooperatively in small groups to rotate through a series of varied stations that allow them to explore, identify, and label different parts of several different plants including the parts of a flower, stem and root structures, and vascular tissue. Students will make observations and inferences about the different structures and functions of plant physiology through a hands-on cycle of exploration.

Type: Lesson Plan

Plant Energy:

In this lesson, students will explore the roles of roots and leaves in the process of photosynthesis with hands-on activity and a real world case of an exception in the plant kingdom. Students will compare and contrast the roles of roots and leaves in photosynthesis and relate it with the plant Rafflesia.

Type: Lesson Plan

Water's Journey:

This lesson takes students through a series of observations that will allow students to explore waters path through hand grown plants, examine xylem in celery, and observe stomata from slides they create.

Type: Lesson Plan

Flower Poetry:

In this lesson, students will dissect a flower to explore the flower's structures and their functions. Students will also observe the flowers, fruit and cones to discover the similarities and differences in their functions.

Type: Lesson Plan

Understanding the process of transpiration:

This lesson is intended to provide student with an introduction to the process of transpiration. The goal is to help students understand the process of transpiration and the role that this process plays in plant physiology.

Type: Lesson Plan

Why do plants eat bugs? An Investigation of Carnivorous Plant Structures:

This is a plant structure and function internet research based lesson. Carnivorous plant structure and function modifications are used compare to the structure and functions of the major organs and tissues of non-carnivorous plants. Internet and student computers are required for this lesson. A carnivorous plant specimen (pitcher plant preferred) and a non-carnivorous plant specimen in the classroom is highly recommended for increased student interest.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Case of the Stolen Painting: A Forensic Mystery:

This video was conceived around the idea that students, particularly those not in AP-level classes, have a practical application for knowing about the major divisions between plants, particularly about the details of plant anatomy and reproduction.

My objectives for this lesson are as follows:

  • Students will be able to identify the major evolutionary innovations that separate plant divisions, and classify plants as belonging to one of those divisions based on phenotypic differences in plants.
  • Students will be able to classify plants by their pollen dispersal methods using pollen dispersal mapping, and justify the location of a "crime scene" using map analysis.
Extension:
  • Students will be able to analyze and present their analysis of banding patterns from DNA fingerprinting done using plants in a forensic context.
For the lesson, students will need to be familiar with the idea that living things are related, that these relationships are part of organisms' evolutionary history; that there are types of plants; and that DNA can be used to establish similarities and differences between individuals and species. It will also be helpful for them to know that increased genetic diversity will increase a species' likelihood of survival. The lesson will take approximately 135 minutes (one 90 period, one 45 minute period), with some material assigned as homework. Materials needed: Paper, writing utensils, color printing is ideal.

Type: Lesson Plan

It's Just a Leaf:

Students will explore the role and function of the leaf and its microscopic structures by using a cross section of a lilac leaf microscope slide.

Type: Lesson Plan

Photomicrography of Wet Mounts of Hibiscus Plant Parts & pH Determination of Their Extracts:

This structured inquiry lesson deals mainly on the preparation of cross-section wet-mounts of the Hibiscus stem, leaf and flower, and their photomicrography. Additionally, students will prepare the extracts of the Hibiscus stem, leaf, and flower, and determine their pH using the Hydrion (pH paper) and universal indicator. This lesson will allow the students to confirm the microscopic structures of the Hibiscus plant parts that could be observed through the photomicrographs, and infer on the chemical nature (acid, base, or neutral) of the plant extract depending on the determined pH values.

Type: Lesson Plan

Plant Similes:

Students will review the unit on the standard SC.912.L.14.7 (relate the structure of each of the major plant organs and tissues to physiological processes) by using Magical Squares. They then will create similes for the major plant organs and tissues and their physiological processes.

Type: Lesson Plan

plants, plaNTS, PLANTS:

Students will explore the growth and development of plants by growing their own plants and documenting growth and development of major plant organs. Students will also create their own slides to observe and define the role meristematic tissue in the growth of plants.

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorial

Plant Organs:

Learn about the structure, function, and evolutionary origins of plant tissues and organs with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Perspectives Video: Teaching Idea

Categorizing Plant Specimens:

Get outside and interact with nature after you watch this idea for teaching about the different parts of plants!

Download the CPALMS Perspectives video student note taking guide.

Type: Perspectives Video: Teaching Idea

Project

Transpirational Design Lab:

This is an inquiry design lab for students to understand transpirational pull of plants. Like all inquiry labs, it is open for more designs than the one presented in the PowerPoint example. The example in the PowerPoint is the easiest to implement in the classroom. It requires a growlite (a bulb that produces the UV light plants need to grow), a fan, a light source with a 100 Watt bulb, Ziplock bags, rope, and plants that are the same (I use petunias).

Type: Project

Text Resources

Plant Detectives Dig into How Cells Grow:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. Moss is being used as a model system that may hold the key to understanding how all plant and animal cells grow. This article shows how a deeper understanding of cell growth is being established: specifically, how the cytoskeleton directs growth.

Type: Text Resource

Scientists Discover Important Mechanism in Plant Cells Which Regulates Direction Plant Cells Grow:

This informational text is intended to support reading in the content area. The text describes a discovery scientists have made regarding a mechanism that regulates the direction in which plants grow.

Type: Text Resource

Tutorials

Water Transport in Plants:

This tutorial will help you to understand how plant cells intake water. This animation shows how water is transported from the root systems of plants upwards to the leaves.

Type: Tutorial

Sensory Systems in Plants:

This tutorial will help you to understand phytochromes in plants and how they affect plant growth. Phytochromes are pigment containing proteins that play an important role in plant regulation, including the germination of seeds.

Type: Tutorial

Video/Audio/Animations

Movement Through a Plant:

The cohesion-tension theory describes how fluids move up the xylem to the leaves of a tree. With this tutorial learners will understand how water moves through a plant. Absorption and transpiration work together with cohesion and tension to move fluids from the soil, through the roots, and up through the tops of the tree.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Plant Structure:

Paul Andersen explains the major plants structures. He starts with a brief discussion of monocot and dicot plants. He then describes the three main tissues in plants; dermal, ground and vascular. He also describes the plant cells within each of these tissues; epidermis, parenchyma, collenchyma, sclerencyma, xylem and phloem.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Worksheet

The Biology Corner:

This resource for biology teachers includes a lesson plan section which contains classroom activities, labs and worksheets. The activity sheets are categorized by Science and Literacy, Anatomy, Scientific Method, Cells, Phyla, Evolution and Taxonomy, Genetics, Ecology, and Plants.

Type: Worksheet

Original Student Tutorials Science - Grades 9-12

Plant Organs:

Learn about the structure, function, and evolutionary origins of plant tissues and organs with this interactive tutorial.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Original Student Tutorial

Plant Organs:

Learn about the structure, function, and evolutionary origins of plant tissues and organs with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Tutorials

Water Transport in Plants:

This tutorial will help you to understand how plant cells intake water. This animation shows how water is transported from the root systems of plants upwards to the leaves.

Type: Tutorial

Sensory Systems in Plants:

This tutorial will help you to understand phytochromes in plants and how they affect plant growth. Phytochromes are pigment containing proteins that play an important role in plant regulation, including the germination of seeds.

Type: Tutorial

Video/Audio/Animation

Movement Through a Plant:

The cohesion-tension theory describes how fluids move up the xylem to the leaves of a tree. With this tutorial learners will understand how water moves through a plant. Absorption and transpiration work together with cohesion and tension to move fluids from the soil, through the roots, and up through the tops of the tree.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Video/Audio/Animation

Movement Through a Plant:

The cohesion-tension theory describes how fluids move up the xylem to the leaves of a tree. With this tutorial learners will understand how water moves through a plant. Absorption and transpiration work together with cohesion and tension to move fluids from the soil, through the roots, and up through the tops of the tree.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation