SC.912.P.10.17

Explore the theory of electromagnetism by explaining electromagnetic waves in terms of oscillating electric and magnetic fields.
General Information
Subject Area: Science
Grade: 912
Body of Knowledge: Physical Science
Idea: Level 3: Strategic Thinking & Complex Reasoning
Standard: Energy -

A. Energy is involved in all physical and chemical processes. It is conserved, and can be transformed from one form to another and into work. At the atomic and nuclear levels energy is not continuous but exists in discrete amounts. Energy and mass are related through Einstein's equation E=mc2.

B. The properties of atomic nuclei are responsible for energy-related phenomena such as radioactivity, fission and fusion.

C. Changes in entropy and energy that accompany chemical reactions influence reaction paths. Chemical reactions result in the release or absorption of energy.

D. The theory of electromagnetism explains that electricity and magnetism are closely related. Electric charges are the source of electric fields. Moving charges generate magnetic fields.

E. Waves are the propagation of a disturbance. They transport energy and momentum but do not transport matter.

Date Adopted or Revised: 02/08
Date of Last Rating: 05/08
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
2002450: Integrated Science 3 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2003390: Physics 1 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2003410: Physics 2 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2003610: Principles of Technology 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018 (course terminated))
2003500: Renewable Energy 1 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
2003836: Florida's Preinternational Baccalaureate Physics 1 (Specifically in versions: 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
2003838: Florida's Preinternational Baccalaureate Physics 2 (Specifically in versions: 2015 and beyond)

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Perspectives Video: Expert

Electromagnetism:

The director of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory describes electromagnetic waves.

Download the CPALMS Perspectives video student note taking guide.

Type: Perspectives Video: Expert

Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiast

Art and Prototyping with Laser-cut Materials:

Blaze a trail when you utilize laser technology to make art.

Type: Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiast

Resource Collection

Exploring Magnetism Lesson Series:

"These seven NASA-funded magnetism guides contain activity- or math-based lessons on magnetic fields. The science and mathematics education standards these activities cover are in the beginning of the guides... These guides were developed as part of the Education and Public Outreach programs of the following NASA science missions: STEREO-IMPACT, RHESSI, THEMIS, and FAST."

These are modules, including student worksheets, about magnetism in general and especially about the Earth's magnetic field.

Type: Resource Collection

Text Resource

Sound, Light, and Water Waves and How Scientists Worked Out the Mathematics :

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. This text describes in a historical context how the wave equation quantifies scientific experimentation performed over a hundred years ago to explain how light behaves from the perspective of math and physics. The wave equation has also proved useful in understanding quantum mechanics.

Type: Text Resource

Tutorials

Electromagnetic Wave Propagation:

  • Observe that light is composed of oscillating electric and magnetic waves
  • Explore the propagation of an electromagnetic wave through its electric and magnetic field vectors
  • Observe the difference in propagation of light of different wavelengths

Type: Tutorial

Basic Electromagnetic Wave Properties:

  • Explore the relationship between wavelength, frequency, amplitude and energy of an electromagnetic wave
  • Compare the characteristics of waves of different wavelengths

Type: Tutorial

Video/Audio/Animation

Fourier: Making Waves:

  • Describe sound in terms of sinusoidal waves
  • Explain what the symbols lambda, T, k, omega, and n represent on the graph of a wave
  • Explain the relationship between the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle and the properties of waves

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Virtual Manipulatives

Electromagnetic Radiation:

  • Explain the nature of light in terms of electromagnetic waves
  • Observe the electromagnetic waves in three dimensions
  • Explain light in terms of its electric and magnetic field components

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Magnets and Electromagnets:


This virtual manipulative will allow the students to explore the interactions between a compass and bar magnet. Students can discover that magnetic fields are produced when all the electrons in a metal object are spinning in the same direction, either as a natural phenomenon, in an artificially created magnet, or when they are induced to do so by an electromagnetic field.
Some of the sample learning goals can be:

  • Predict the direction of the magnet field for different locations around a bar magnet and electromagnet.
  • Compare and contrast bar magnets and electromagnets.
  • Identify the characteristics of electromagnets that are variable and what effects each variable has on the magnetic field's strength and direction.
  • Relate magnetic field strength to distance quantitatively and qualitatively.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Simplified MRI:

Whether it is a tumor or not, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can tell. Your head is full of tiny radio transmitters (the nuclear spins of the hydrogen nuclei of your water molecules). In an MRI unit, these little radios can be made to broadcast their positions, giving a detailed picture of the inside of your head.

In this simulation you can:

  • Recognize that light can flip spins if the energy of the photons matches the difference between the energies of spin up and spin down.
  • Recognize that the difference between the energies of spin up and spin down is proportional to the strength of the applied magnetic field.
  • Describe how to put these two ideas together to detect where there is a higher density of spins.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Perspectives Video: Expert

Electromagnetism:

The director of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory describes electromagnetic waves.

Download the CPALMS Perspectives video student note taking guide.

Type: Perspectives Video: Expert

Tutorials

Electromagnetic Wave Propagation:

  • Observe that light is composed of oscillating electric and magnetic waves
  • Explore the propagation of an electromagnetic wave through its electric and magnetic field vectors
  • Observe the difference in propagation of light of different wavelengths

Type: Tutorial

Basic Electromagnetic Wave Properties:

  • Explore the relationship between wavelength, frequency, amplitude and energy of an electromagnetic wave
  • Compare the characteristics of waves of different wavelengths

Type: Tutorial

Virtual Manipulative

Simplified MRI:

Whether it is a tumor or not, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can tell. Your head is full of tiny radio transmitters (the nuclear spins of the hydrogen nuclei of your water molecules). In an MRI unit, these little radios can be made to broadcast their positions, giving a detailed picture of the inside of your head.

In this simulation you can:

  • Recognize that light can flip spins if the energy of the photons matches the difference between the energies of spin up and spin down.
  • Recognize that the difference between the energies of spin up and spin down is proportional to the strength of the applied magnetic field.
  • Describe how to put these two ideas together to detect where there is a higher density of spins.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Perspectives Video: Expert

Electromagnetism:

The director of the National High Magnetic Field Laboratory describes electromagnetic waves.

Download the CPALMS Perspectives video student note taking guide.

Type: Perspectives Video: Expert

Virtual Manipulatives

Magnets and Electromagnets:


This virtual manipulative will allow the students to explore the interactions between a compass and bar magnet. Students can discover that magnetic fields are produced when all the electrons in a metal object are spinning in the same direction, either as a natural phenomenon, in an artificially created magnet, or when they are induced to do so by an electromagnetic field.
Some of the sample learning goals can be:

  • Predict the direction of the magnet field for different locations around a bar magnet and electromagnet.
  • Compare and contrast bar magnets and electromagnets.
  • Identify the characteristics of electromagnets that are variable and what effects each variable has on the magnetic field's strength and direction.
  • Relate magnetic field strength to distance quantitatively and qualitatively.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Simplified MRI:

Whether it is a tumor or not, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) can tell. Your head is full of tiny radio transmitters (the nuclear spins of the hydrogen nuclei of your water molecules). In an MRI unit, these little radios can be made to broadcast their positions, giving a detailed picture of the inside of your head.

In this simulation you can:

  • Recognize that light can flip spins if the energy of the photons matches the difference between the energies of spin up and spin down.
  • Recognize that the difference between the energies of spin up and spin down is proportional to the strength of the applied magnetic field.
  • Describe how to put these two ideas together to detect where there is a higher density of spins.

Type: Virtual Manipulative