SC.6.L.14.3

Recognize and explore how cells of all organisms undergo similar processes to maintain homeostasis, including extracting energy from food, getting rid of waste, and reproducing.
General Information
Subject Area: Science
Grade: 6
Body of Knowledge: Life Science
Idea: Level 2: Basic Application of Skills & Concepts
Big Idea: Organization and Development of Living Organisms -

A. All living things share certain characteristics.

B. The scientific theory of cells, also called cell theory, is a fundamental organizing principle of life on Earth.

C. Life can be organized in a functional and structural hierarchy.

D. Life is maintained by various physiological functions essential for growth, reproduction, and homeostasis.

Date Adopted or Revised: 02/08
Date of Last Rating: 05/08
Status: State Board Approved
Assessed: Yes

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
2002040: M/J Comprehensive Science 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2002050: M/J Comprehensive Science 1, Advanced (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2000010: M/J Life Science (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2000020: M/J Life Science, Advanced (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
7820015: Access M/J Comprehensive Science 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))
2002055: M/J Comprehensive Science 1 Accelerated Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
7920030: Fundamental Integrated Science 1 (Specifically in versions: 2013 - 2015, 2015 - 2017 (course terminated))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
SC.6.L.14.In.3: Identify that cells carry out important functions within an organism, such as using energy from food.
SC.6.L.14.Su.3: Recognize that animals, including humans, use energy from food.
SC.6.L.14.Pa.3: Identify basic needs of plants and animals.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

Cell Recycling: Nobel Awarded for Unveiling How Cells Recycle Their Trash:

In this lesson, students will analyze an informational text intended to support reading in the content area. Cell biologist, Yoshinori Ohsumi, won the Nobel Prize for medicine for his research of how cells recycle unused materials in order to maintain homeostasis. The text describes his research and contains statements from other scientists supporting Ohsumi as the right choice for the award. This lesson includes a note-taking guide, text-dependent questions, a writing prompt, answer keys and a writing rubric.

Type: Lesson Plan

Homeostasis: Can You Survive? :

This lesson begins with a presentation and vocabulary building component. After becoming familiar with the terms, the students get into groups (acting as cells) and use their vocabulary knowledge to survive various environmental changes.

Type: Lesson Plan

Here's Hoping for Homeostasis!:

Students will examine the importance of homeostasis and how the cell membrane helps the cell maintain homeostasis through a mini-demonstration, gummy bear lab activity, a video and a vocabulary exercise.

Type: Lesson Plan

Passive VS. Active:

Students will explain and contrast how passive and active transport occur within a cell to maintain homeostasis. Creating an anchor chart which includes a labeled diagram, students will be introduced to the passive and active transport in relation to keeping a cell in homeostasis.

Type: Lesson Plan

3D Printing Pizza in Space!:

Students will learn how NASA's scientists are exploring the possibility of 3D printing food in space. The students will evaluate various sources of protein, taking into consideration the nutritional quality of each, along with the cost to produce them, and finally their impact on the environment.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Cell as a System:

This is a complete lesson plan designed to deepen student understanding of the major organelles of animal cells and the way in which cells function as individual systems. The lesson plan develops the analogy of cells as factories in order to achieve this understanding. Detailed supplemental student reading materials are included in this lesson plan as is a worksheet for students to complete (an answer key is also included).

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorial

Cells: Alike but Different:

Cells are very diverse, but are the foundation of all living things. Take a look at different types of cells and learn how they have similar needs. Cell are alike, but different!

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiast

KROS Pacific Ocean Kayak Journey: Calories, Exercise, and Metabolism Rates:

How much food do you need to cross the Pacific in a kayak? Get a calculator and a bag of almonds before you watch this.

Related Resources:
KROS Pacific Ocean Kayak Journey: GPS Data Set[.XLSX]
KROS Pacific Ocean Kayak Journey: Path Visualization for Google Earth[.KML]

Type: Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiast

Teaching Idea

Fish and Onions, Can You Dig It?:

This resource provides microscope photos of fish and onion cells and allows students to identify the phase of mitosis shown in each photograph.

Type: Teaching Idea

Text Resource

Nobel Awarded for Unveiling How Cells Recycle Their Trash:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. The article highlights the work of cell biologist, Yoshinori Ohsumi, who won the Nobel Prize for physiology for his research on how cells recycle unused materials in order to maintain homeostasis. Ohsumi studied what the cell did if it started to "starve." He noticed how the cell would start "eating" some of the parts it didn't really need in order to survive. This process is called autophagy. Scientists hope that Ohsumi’s discovery will help find a cure for diseases like Alzheimer's, which is caused by cell trash buildup in the brain.

Type: Text Resource

STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

3D Printing Pizza in Space!:

Students will learn how NASA's scientists are exploring the possibility of 3D printing food in space. The students will evaluate various sources of protein, taking into consideration the nutritional quality of each, along with the cost to produce them, and finally their impact on the environment.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Original Student Tutorials Science - Grades K-8

Cells: Alike but Different:

Cells are very diverse, but are the foundation of all living things. Take a look at different types of cells and learn how they have similar needs. Cell are alike, but different!

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Original Student Tutorial

Cells: Alike but Different:

Cells are very diverse, but are the foundation of all living things. Take a look at different types of cells and learn how they have similar needs. Cell are alike, but different!

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.