SC.6.E.7.8

Describe ways human beings protect themselves from hazardous weather and sun exposure.
General Information
Subject Area: Science
Grade: 6
Body of Knowledge: Earth and Space Science
Idea: Level 2: Basic Application of Skills & Concepts
Big Idea: Earth Systems and Patterns - The scientific theory of the evolution of Earth states that changes in our planet are driven by the flow of energy and the cycling of matter through dynamic interactions among the atmosphere, hydrosphere, cryosphere, geosphere, and biosphere, and the resources used to sustain human civilization on Earth.
Date Adopted or Revised: 02/08
Date of Last Rating: 05/08
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
2002040: M/J Comprehensive Science 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2002050: M/J Comprehensive Science 1, Advanced (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2001010: M/J Earth/Space Science (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2001020: M/J Earth/Space Science, Advanced (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
7820015: Access M/J Comprehensive Science 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))
2002055: M/J Comprehensive Science 1 Accelerated Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)
2002200: M/J STEM Environmental Science (Specifically in versions: 2015 - 2022 (current), 2022 and beyond)

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
SC.6.E.7.Pa.5: Recognize where to go in severe weather situations or drills at school and at home.
SC.6.E.7.In.8: Identify ways humans get ready for severe storms and protect themselves from sun exposure.
SC.6.E.7.Su.8: Recognize ways people prepare for severe storms and protect themselves from sun exposure.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Image/Photograph

Thunderstorms, Tornadoes, Lightning: A Preparedness Guide:

This PDF included at this site has information about family preparedness plans and safety rules, and information about thunderstorms, tornadoes, and lightning such as facts, when and where they occur, and how they form.

Type: Image/Photograph

Lesson Plans

Florida Water Hazard Warning Simulation:

This lesson is a culminating lesson in the Florida Landforms & Water Unit that gives students the ability to use their knowledge of water and potential weather hazards that affect different Florida landforms. This lesson allows students to create a computer program that demonstrates a flood hazard and how to monitor it.

Type: Lesson Plan

Withstanding A Hurricane:

Students will design a weather tower that can withstand high winds in this Engineering Design Challenge. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Today's Weather Alert:

The students will learn about various types of hazardous weather, including hurricanes, tornadoes, wildfires, floods, and sun exposure. The students will watch a newscast of the Great Blizzard of 1977. They will participate in a carousel activity, which allows them to think about how hazardous weather affects those living in Florida. Additionally, students will work in small groups on creating a 2-3 minute news broadcast video about hazardous weather affecting their area.

Type: Lesson Plan

Blown Away:

A STEM Engineering Design Challenge

Learning Goals

  • Students will be able to demonstrate an understanding of hazardous weather conditions, specifically hurricanes, and identify ways for humans to protect themselves during those conditions.
  • Students will understand how area of various shapes can enhance the stability of a structure.


Students will create a free-standing structure that can withstand hurricane-force winds. Students will demonstrate their understanding of surface area by constraining to sets of parameters for their structures.

Type: Lesson Plan

Lightning Strikes! :

In this lesson, students will analyze an informational text that addresses what causes lightning and thunder. The text also outlines ways to stay safe during a lightning storm. This informational text is designed to support reading in the content area. The lesson plan includes a note-taking guide, text-dependent questions, a writing prompt, answer keys, and a writing rubric.

Type: Lesson Plan

Building Materials and Locations :

Students will apply their knowledge of hazardous weather to determine a system to rank where to build a new school and to select the type of building materials that should be used.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Human Protecting Themselves from Hazardous Weather :

This lesson will use station activities to engage students in the process of understanding how people protect themselves from hazardous weather and sun exposure.

Type: Lesson Plan

From Andrew to Katrina: Ways to Protect Ourselves in Such Disasters:

We're going to rock you like a hurricane!

Students will identify ways to protect themselves from hurricanes by writing alternative lyrics to the tune of their choice.

Type: Lesson Plan

Defense Against Hurricanes :

Living in Florida, we are often faced with dangerous hurricanes. This lesson will help students identify three primary hurricane threats, known as the "Triple Threat" according to National Weather Service. Students will also create strategies to defend against these hazards.

Type: Lesson Plan

Inland Flood Protection Using Levees-An Engineering Design Challenge:

This Engineering Design Challenge is intended to help students apply the concepts of protecting human life from hazardous weather from SC.6.E.7.8 as they build levees to prevent flooding. It is not intended as an initial introduction to this benchmark.

Type: Lesson Plan

Gone with the Wind...NOT!:

Students are offered a proposal to rank recommended hurricane proof buildings based on current designs and stability in hurricane season regions. This activity provides students with an open-ended, realistic problem in which students work as a team to evaluate structural designs - resilient and safe, in severe weather conditions, hurricane winds, storm surge, water damage/destruction. Students will research hurricane history, anatomy, and behavior, with the impact on geography and human population. The designs of models demonstrate students’ knowledge of a stable hurricane proof structure used as a basis for coastal structures.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

See the Unseen:

The electromagnetic spectrum is everywhere and provides energy to us every day. Although we may not see it with the natural eye, we can see it with technology. The electromagnetic spectrum affects our lives in everything we do. Students get to study the effect of the spectrum on their technology and their interests in space, medicine, music, videos, the human body, and handheld mobile computer technology that is so important in their world.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Storm Window Treatments:

Students will be asked to analyze a given set of data to determine the best storm window treatments for a local company to use when building a new homes. Students will be asked to write a letter to the company explaining how they ranked the storm window treatments.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Block the Rays:

This is a 6th grade MEA. This MEA will ask students to work as a team to rank various fabrics to see which one is the best at blocking the sun.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiast

Hurricane Dennis & Failed Math Models:

What happens when math models go wrong in forecasting hurricanes?

Download the CPALMS Perspectives video student note taking guide.

Type: Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiast

Teaching Ideas

You Too Can Survive a Hurricane!:

Students will learn about the technology used to study hurricanes and the choices people make to survive a hurricane's affect.

Type: Teaching Idea

Pack Your Sled for an Arctic Expedition-SeaWorld Classroom Activity:

In this activity, students will chart a course across the arctic given limited resources and various methods of travel.

Type: Teaching Idea

Text Resources

What Causes Thunder and Lightning?:

This informational text resource is designed to support reading in the content area. The text describes what causes lightning and examines the science behind cloud-to-ground lightning strikes. It also discusses what causes thunder and explains why we see the lightning before we hear the thunder. The last section of the text provides important rules about lightning safety and lists ways to stay safe during a lightning storm.

Type: Text Resource

Hurricane Andrew’s Legacy: "Like a Bomb" in Florida:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area.  This article gives an account of the events before, during, and after Hurricane Andrew’s assault on South Florida in August of 1992. The author describes why South Florida was unprepared for what became a category 5 hurricane, why certain areas suffered such extensive damage, and improvements that have been made in prediction and preparedness for future storms. 

Type: Text Resource

11-year-old Designs a Better Sandbag, Named 'America's Top Young Scientist':

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. This NBC News science article describes the success of a young inventor's polymer and salt filled sandbags, designed for more efficient flood protection and deployment.

Type: Text Resource

Tutorial

Structures and Storms:

Click "View Site" to open a full-screen version. This tutorial is designed to help secondary science teachers learn how to integrate literacy skills within their curriculum. This tutorial focuses on identifying and evaluating the different text structures authors use to organize information in informative texts. The focus on literacy across content areas is designed to help students independently build knowledge in different disciplines through reading and writing.

Type: Tutorial

Video/Audio/Animation

Antarctica: A Challenging Work Day:

In this NOVA-adapted video clip, members of a research team deal with the inhospitable climate and other hazards while researching in Antarctica. Many scientists consider the opportunity to do their research in Antarctica a dream come true. The extreme environment and remoteness make it one of the most untouched regions on the planet. There is a treaty that allows more than 20 nations to maintain research facilities, and dedicates the entire continent to peaceful scientific investigation.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Virtual Manipulative

The Disaster Area: FEMA for Kids:

Through this website, students learn about different weather disasters and what to do before, during, and after an emergency.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

Block the Rays:

This is a 6th grade MEA. This MEA will ask students to work as a team to rank various fabrics to see which one is the best at blocking the sun.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Building Materials and Locations :

Students will apply their knowledge of hazardous weather to determine a system to rank where to build a new school and to select the type of building materials that should be used.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Gone with the Wind...NOT!:

Students are offered a proposal to rank recommended hurricane proof buildings based on current designs and stability in hurricane season regions. This activity provides students with an open-ended, realistic problem in which students work as a team to evaluate structural designs - resilient and safe, in severe weather conditions, hurricane winds, storm surge, water damage/destruction. Students will research hurricane history, anatomy, and behavior, with the impact on geography and human population. The designs of models demonstrate students’ knowledge of a stable hurricane proof structure used as a basis for coastal structures.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

See the Unseen:

The electromagnetic spectrum is everywhere and provides energy to us every day. Although we may not see it with the natural eye, we can see it with technology. The electromagnetic spectrum affects our lives in everything we do. Students get to study the effect of the spectrum on their technology and their interests in space, medicine, music, videos, the human body, and handheld mobile computer technology that is so important in their world.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Storm Window Treatments:

Students will be asked to analyze a given set of data to determine the best storm window treatments for a local company to use when building a new homes. Students will be asked to write a letter to the company explaining how they ranked the storm window treatments.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Image/Photograph

Thunderstorms, Tornadoes, Lightning: A Preparedness Guide:

This PDF included at this site has information about family preparedness plans and safety rules, and information about thunderstorms, tornadoes, and lightning such as facts, when and where they occur, and how they form.

Type: Image/Photograph

Video/Audio/Animation

Antarctica: A Challenging Work Day:

In this NOVA-adapted video clip, members of a research team deal with the inhospitable climate and other hazards while researching in Antarctica. Many scientists consider the opportunity to do their research in Antarctica a dream come true. The extreme environment and remoteness make it one of the most untouched regions on the planet. There is a treaty that allows more than 20 nations to maintain research facilities, and dedicates the entire continent to peaceful scientific investigation.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Virtual Manipulative

The Disaster Area: FEMA for Kids:

Through this website, students learn about different weather disasters and what to do before, during, and after an emergency.

Type: Virtual Manipulative

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Image/Photograph

Thunderstorms, Tornadoes, Lightning: A Preparedness Guide:

This PDF included at this site has information about family preparedness plans and safety rules, and information about thunderstorms, tornadoes, and lightning such as facts, when and where they occur, and how they form.

Type: Image/Photograph

Virtual Manipulative

The Disaster Area: FEMA for Kids:

Through this website, students learn about different weather disasters and what to do before, during, and after an emergency.

Type: Virtual Manipulative