SC.5.N.1.1

Define a problem, use appropriate reference materials to support scientific understanding, plan and carry out scientific investigations of various types such as: systematic observations, experiments requiring the identification of variables, collecting and organizing data, interpreting data in charts, tables, and graphics, analyze information, make predictions, and defend conclusions.
General Information
Subject Area: Science
Grade: 5
Body of Knowledge: Nature of Science
Idea: Level 3: Strategic Thinking & Complex Reasoning
Big Idea: The Practice of Science -

A: Scientific inquiry is a multifaceted activity; The processes of science include the formulation of scientifically investigable questions, construction of investigations into those questions, the collection of appropriate data, the evaluation of the meaning of those data, and the communication of this evaluation.

B: The processes of science frequently do not correspond to the traditional portrayal of "the scientific method."

C: Scientific argumentation is a necessary part of scientific inquiry and plays an important role in the generation and validation of scientific knowledge.

D: Scientific knowledge is based on observation and inference; it is important to recognize that these are very different things. Not only does science require creativity in its methods and processes, but also in its questions and explanations.

Date Adopted or Revised: 02/08
Date of Last Rating: 05/08
Status: State Board Approved
Assessed: Yes
Test Item Specifications
  • Item Type(s): This benchmark may be assessed using: MC item(s)
  • Also Assesses
    SC.3.N.1.1 Raise questions about the natural world, investigate them individually and in teams through free exploration and systematic investigations, and generate appropriate explanations based on those explorations.

    SC.4.N.1.1 Raise questions about the natural world, use appropriate reference materials that support understanding to obtain information (identifying the source), conduct both individual and team investigations through free exploration and systematic investigations, and generate appropriate explanations based on those explorations.

    SC.4.N.1.6 Keep records that describe observations made, carefully distinguishing actual observations from ideas and inferences about the observations.

    SC.5.N.1.2 Explain the difference between an experiment and other types of scientific investigation.

    SC.5.N.1.4 Identify a control group and explain its importance in an experiment.

  • Clarification :
    Students will evaluate a written procedure or experimental setup.

    Students will identify appropriate forms of record keeping.

    Students will interpret and analyze data to generate appropriate explanations based on that data.

    Students will identify examples of or distinguish among observations, predictions, and/or inferences.

    Students will explain the difference between an experiment and other types of scientific investigations.

    Students will identify a control group and/or explain its importance in an experiment.
  • Content Limits :
    Items will not require the identification or evaluation of a hypothesis.

    Items should not use the term hypothesis. Items will not require the design of a procedure.

    Items will not require mathematical computations.

    Items will not require the differentiation between outcome variables (dependent variables) and test variables (independent variables).

    Items will not assess the reason for differences in data across groups that are investigating the same problem.

    Items referring to conclusions will not require the formation of a conclusion.
  • Stimulus Attributes :
    Scenarios describing a scientific experiment are limited to one control group.

    Scenarios referring to observations will not use the term systematic observation.
  • Response Attributes :
    None specified
  • Prior Knowledge :
    Items may require the student to apply science knowledge described in the NGSSS from lower grades. This benchmark requires prerequisite knowledge from SC.K.N.1.1, SC.K.N.1.2, SC.K.N.1.3, SC.K.N.1.4, SC.K.N.1.5, SC.1.N.1.1, SC.1.N.1.2, SC.1.N.1.3, SC.1.N.1.4, SC.1.E.5.3, SC.2.N.1.1, SC.2.N.1.3, SC.3.N.1.3, SC.3.N.1.6, SC.4.N.1.4, and SC.4.E.6.5.
Sample Test Items (1)
  • Test Item #: Sample Item 1
  • Question: Delilah followed these steps of an investigation:
    • Collect five objects made of different types of metal.
    • Place them on a large laboratory table.
    • Touch each metal object with a magnet and lift slowly.
    • Record observations.

    Which of the following statements is Delilah most likely testing?

  • Difficulty: N/A
  • Type: MC: Multiple Choice

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5020060: Science - Grade Five (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
7720060: Access Science Grade 5 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))
5020120: STEM Lab Grade 5 (Specifically in versions: 2016 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
SC.5.N.1.In.1: Ask a question about the natural world, use selected reference materials to find information, work with others to carry out a simple experiment, and share results.
SC.5.N.1.Su.1: Ask questions about the natural world, use selected materials to find information, observe, and identify answers to the question.
SC.5.N.1.Pa.1: Explore, observe, and select an object or picture to respond to a question about the natural world.

Related Resources

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Formative Assessment

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Perspectives Video: Teaching Idea

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Professional Development

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Resource Collection

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Teaching Ideas

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Text Resource

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Unit/Lesson Sequences

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Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

Circuits:

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Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

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STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

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Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Wazzup Charter Schools Playground Dilemma MEA:

This Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) is written at a 5th grade level. The Wazzup Charter School MEA provides students with an engineering problem in which they must work as a team to design a procedure to select the best type of surface for a playground at a charter school.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

You Be the Judge:

This model eliciting activity teaches students a common version of the scientific method by making them the judges of a science fair. In order to judge the science fair projects they have to evaluate the importance of each step of the scientific method and assign a value to it.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.