SS.912.CG.1.3

Explain arguments presented in the Federalist Papers in support of ratifying the U.S. Constitution and a republican form of government.

Clarifications

Clarification 1: Students will recognize that the Federalist Papers argued for a federal system of government, separation of powers and a representative form of government that is accountable to its citizens.

Clarification 2: Students will analyze Federalist and Anti-Federalist arguments concerning ratification of the U.S. Constitution and inclusion of a bill of rights.

General Information
Subject Area: Social Studies
Grade: 912
Strand: Civics and Government (Starting 2023-2024)
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
2100380: Visions and Their Pursuits:An American Tradition-U.S.History to 1920 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
2100470: Visions & Their Pursuits:An AmerTrad-U.S. Hist to 1920 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
2105340: Philosophy (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
2106310: United States Government (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
2106320: United States Government Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
2106340: Political Science (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
2106350: Law Studies (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
2106370: Comprehensive Law Studies (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
2106375: Comprehensive Law Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
2106380: Legal Systems and Concepts (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
2106460: The American Political System: Process and Power Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
2106468: Constitutional Law Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
2106800: Florida's Preinternational Baccalaureate United States Government (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
7921015: Access United States Government  (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
2106315: United States Government for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
2105355: Philosophy Honors: Ethics (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
2106410: Humane Letters 1 History (Specifically in versions: 2019 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
2106415: Humane Letters 1 History Honors (Specifically in versions: 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
SS.912.CG.1.AP.3: Recognize the arguments presented in the Federalist Papers in support of ratifying the U.S. Constitution and a republican form of government.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Assessment

Source Analysis: U.S. Constitution - Comparative Views :

In this assessment, students will discuss controversies over ratification of the U.S. Constitution, as well as identifying and analyzing differences between Federalists and Anti-Federalist perspectives. 

Type: Assessment

Lesson Plans

Federalist Paper No. 84:

This lesson will give students the opportunity to examine all three rhetorical appeals for an argument and discover how all three work together to achieve the author's intended purpose. Students will analyze Federalist Paper #84, explaining the arguments in favor of ratification of the proposed Constitution.

Type: Lesson Plan

Opposing Points of View - Good or Bad? Federalists and Anti-Federalists:

In this lesson plan, students identify the difference between Federalist and Anti-Federalist viewpoints through analysis of primary source writing. Students will identify concerns from each side and their impacts on the final ratification of the U.S. Constitution. 

Type: Lesson Plan

The Federalist Papers and the Constitution :

In this lesson, students will be able to explain the 3 main subjects of The Federalist Papers and Alexander Hamilton's role in writing them. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Judicial Branch:

In this lesson, students will use the U.S. Constitution Article III, and primary sources, Federalist Papers and Anti-Federalist Papers, to analyze the structures, functions and processes of the judicial branch.

Type: Lesson Plan

Why the Constitution Was Ratified:

In this lesson plan, students analyze excerpts from the Federalist Papers and Anti-Federalist Essays and determine the founding principles presented in each one. 

Type: Lesson Plan

The Road to Ratifying the Constitution :

In this lesson plan, students will compare the viewpoints of the Federalists and Anti-Federalists regarding ratification of the U.S. Constitution using a graphic organizer and an informal debate.

Type: Lesson Plan

Ratification of the Constitution:

In this lesson plan, students will learn about the Federalists and the Anti-Federalists and their role in the debates over ratification of the U.S. Constitution.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Great Debate:

In this lesson plan, students will be provided historical context regarding the public debate to ratify the U.S. Constitution. Students will be assigned either a Federalist or Anti-Federalist document and will conduct a close-read document analysis either individually or with another student. After the individual close-reads are completed the students will be grouped with one or more students who read another document that also expanded on their given position. This lesson can be used as the first part of a two-class debate activity. Part II of this lesson is 200716. 

Type: Lesson Plan

The Great Debate Part 2:

In this lesson plan, students will engage in small group debates on the issues raised by the ratification debate centered on the U.S. Constitution. After the individual close-reads are completed the students will be grouped with one or more students who read another document that also expanded on their given position. The groups will then use the given organizers to prepare their debate points and to track their debate progress. The lesson will conclude with the group writing a consensus statement as to which arguments best answered the debate focus question.

Type: Lesson Plan

Teaching Ideas

Grades 9-12 Civics Family Guide: Standard 1:

This Grades 9-12 Civics Family Guide provides some ideas and activities to support civics education when at home, out and about, and in the community. The activities provided align to the civics learning benchmarks within Standard 1 at these grade levels.

Type: Teaching Idea

U.S. Constitution - Comparative Views Writing Prompt:

In this lesson, student groups will discuss their understanding of the U.S. Constitution, Federalists' arguments in support of ratification, and Anti-Federalist arguments against ratifying the Constitution. Students will discuss controversies over ratification of the U.S. Constitution, as well as identify and analyze differences between Federalist and Anti-Federalist perspectives. Students will then complete a group writing assignment.  

Type: Teaching Idea

High School Debate: Federalists vs. Anti-Federalists:

Students will participate in a debate using the arguments of the Federalists and Anti-Federalists. This could be a verbal, silent, or alley debate. One group will represent the Federalists and be given information relating to their arguments. The other group will act as the Anti-Federalists and be given information relating to their arguments. Provide students time to prepare their arguments either individually or as a team, then commence the debate.

Type: Teaching Idea

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Teaching Idea

Grades 9-12 Civics Family Guide: Standard 1:

This Grades 9-12 Civics Family Guide provides some ideas and activities to support civics education when at home, out and about, and in the community. The activities provided align to the civics learning benchmarks within Standard 1 at these grade levels.

Type: Teaching Idea