SS.5.CG.2.6

Explain symbols and documents that represent the United States.

Clarifications

Clarification 1: Students will recognize the Great Seal of the United States and the Star-Spangled Banner as symbols that represent the United States.

Clarification 2: Students will recognize the U.S. Constitution (specifically the Bill of Rights) and the Emancipation Proclamation as documents that represent the United States.

General Information
Subject Area: Social Studies
Grade: 5
Strand: Civics and Government
Date Adopted or Revised: 05/24
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5021070: Social Studies Grade 5 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
7721016: Access Social Studies - Grade 5 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
SS.5.CG.2.AP.6: Identify a symbol and a document that represents the United States.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

The Star-Spangled Banner Singing Competition:

In this integrated lesson, students will discuss the Star-Spangled banner as a symbol of the United States and review audience etiquette during its performance. Students will engage in being judges of the Star-Spangled Banner Singing Competition where they will define criteria to critique others’ performances.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Great Seal of the United States: Comparing the U.S. Seal to the Florida State Seal:

This is lesson #7 in the text unit series for The Great Seal of the United States by Norman Pearl. In this lesson, students will recognize the Great Seal as a national symbol and then compare and contrast the Great Seal of the United States to the Great Seal of Florida. Students will complete a graphic organizer and then write to tell how the two seals are alike and different.

This ELA/Civics Integrated Text Unit is designed to support students with the integration of civics into the ELA classroom through the reading and studying of both The Great Seal of the United States by Terri DeGezelle and Norman Pearl’s book The Great Seal of the United States. Students will identify new vocabulary, describe both the Florida and the United States seals, as well as the importance of national symbols and their meanings. Using timelines, graphic organizers, worksheets, and other activities they will connect these symbols to other documents like the Declaration of Independence and the understanding of unalienable rights. Each lesson in this series leads to a culminating activity in which students will use their knowledge and understanding of symbols and relevant details to create their own Great Seal.

This resource uses a book that you will need to obtain before implementing the resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Great Seal of the United States: Great Seal Expository Essay:

This is the last of 8 lessons in the text unit series for The Great Seal of the United States by Norman Pearl, focusing on pages 8-19 and 23. In this lesson, students will analyze the symbols used to create the Great Seal and will use the knowledge learned to deepen their understanding of symbols—what they represent and why they are chosen. As a culminating activity, students will develop a personal great seal by writing an expository essay that explains the symbols chosen to represent the country and why.

This ELA/Civics Integrated Text Unit is designed to support students with the integration of civics into the ELA classroom through the reading and studying of Norman Pearl’s book The Great Seal of the United States. Students will identify new vocabulary, describe both Florida and USA seals, as well as the importance of national symbols and their meaning. Using timelines, graphic organizers, worksheets, and other activities, they will connect these symbols to other documents like the Declaration of Independence and the understanding of unalienable rights. Each lesson in this series leads to a culminating activity in which students will use their knowledge and understanding of symbols and relevant details to create their own Great Seal.

This resource uses a book that you will need to obtain before implementing the resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Great Seal of the United States: Vocabulary Mapping:

This is lesson 2 in the text unit series for The Great Seal of the United States by Norman Pearl, focusing on pages 4-21. Students will develop their own definition for targeted civics vocabulary words and non-linguistic representations to deepen their knowledge of academic language. They will begin to build background knowledge as they continue to discover how the Great Seal of the United States was created.

This ELA/Civics Integrated Text Unit is designed to support students with the integration of civics into the ELA classroom through the reading and studying of Norman Pearl’s book The Great Seal of the United States. Throughout the unit, students will identify new vocabulary, describe both Florida and USA seals, as well as the importance of national symbols and their meaning. Using timelines, graphic organizers, worksheets, and other activities they will connect these symbols to other documents like the Declaration of Independence and the understanding of unalienable rights. Each lesson in this series leads to a culminating activity in which students will use their knowledge and understanding of symbols and relevant details to create their own Great Seal.

This resource uses a book that you will need to obtain before implementing the resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Great Seal of the United States: Currency Symbol Scavenger Hunt:

This is lesson 6 in the text unit series for The Great Seal of the United States by Norman Pearl, pages 12-19. Students will analyze the symbols used to create the Great Seal. Students will have a chance to explore artifacts such as the dollar bill, penny, and quarter with a magnifying glass. Students will add to background knowledge by continuing to discover how the Great Seal of the United States was created and what it stands for. Students will also create a great seal using symbols and explain the meanings behind the symbols.

This ELA/Civics Integrated Text Units is designed to support students with the integration of civics into the ELA classroom through the reading and studying of Norman Pearl’s book The Great Seal of the United States. Students will identify new vocabulary, describe both Florida and USA seals, as well as the importance of national symbols and their meaning. Using timelines, graphic organizers, worksheets, and other activities they will connect these symbols to other documents like the Declaration of Independence and the understanding of unalienable rights. Each lesson in this series leads to a culminating activity in which students will use their knowledge and understanding of symbols and relevant details to create their own Great Seal.

This resource uses a book that you will need to obtain before implementing the resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Great Seal of the United States: Timeline of Creating the Great Seal:

This lesson #4 in the text unit series for The Great Seal of the United States by Norman Pearl. In this lesson, students will read the text and pull out the relevant details and important dates. They will then create a timeline and use the information to write a summary about the creation of the Great Seal of the United States.

This ELA/Civics Integrated Text Unit is designed to support students with the integration of civics into the ELA classroom through the reading and studying of Norman Pearl’s book The Great Seal of the United States. Students will identify new vocabulary, describe both Florida and USA seals, as well as the importance of national symbols and their meaning. Using timelines, graphic organizers, worksheets, and other activities, they will connect these symbols to other documents like the Declaration of Independence and the understanding of unalienable rights. Each lesson in this series leads to a culminating activity in which students will use their knowledge and understanding of symbols and relevant details to create their own Great Seal.

This resource uses a book that you will need to obtain before implementing the resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Abraham Lincoln: Life of Honesty: A Time(line) of Freedom:

This is lesson #7 in the text unit series for Abraham Lincoln: A Life of Honesty by Tonya Leslie. After a read aloud students will use the text to create a timeline of Lincoln’s presidency as it relates to the abolition of slavery.

This unit will help students explain why the United States Constitution is an important document that protects the rights of American citizens, the responsibilities of the United States government, and how Abraham Lincoln is an important symbol of the United States Government.

Students will engage in a read aloud spread out over several lessons emphasizing vocabulary, central idea, research, expository and opinion writing, and collaboration in groups.

The teacher will facilitate vocabulary instruction, student research, determination of central ideas, student presentation, expository and opinion writing, and group collaboration to help students demonstrate why the United States Constitution is an important document.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Great Seal of the United States: Getting to Know the Great Seal:

This is lesson #1 in the paired text unit series for The Great Seal of the United States by Terri DeGezelle and The Great Seal of the United States by Norman Pearl. In this lesson students will make observations about relevant details on The Great Seal of the United States, as a prereading activity. Then students will complete a graphic organizer to demonstrate what they see, what they inferred or predicted each symbol represents in regard to the United States, and what they still wonder about The Great Seal.

This ELA/Civics Integrated Text Units is designed to support students with the integration of civics into the ELA classroom through the reading and studying of both The Great Seal of the United States by Terri DeGezelle and Norman Pearl’s book The Great Seal of the United States. Students will identify new vocabulary, describe both Florida and USA seals, as well as the importance of national symbols and their meaning. Using timelines, graphic organizers, worksheets, and other activities they will connect these symbols to ither documents like the Declaration of Independence and the understanding of unalienable rights. Each lesson in this series leads to a culminating activity in which students will use their knowledge and understanding of symbols and relevant details to create their own Great Seal.

This resource uses books that you will need to obtain before implementing the resource. The Great Seal of the United States by Terri DeGezelle is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list.

Type: Lesson Plan

Shhh! We're Writing the Constitution: National Symbols - The U.S. Constitution:

This is lesson 10 in text unit for Shh! We’re Writing the Constitution by Jean Fritz. After reading the text, this lesson will focus on the central idea that the U.S. Constitution is a recognized symbol of the United States, and details that support the central idea. Students will recognize that the writing and ratification of the U.S. Constitution was necessary for the United States to be a unified country rather than individual states. After reading Shh! We’re Writing the Constitution, students will identify the central idea of the text and specific details that support it using a graphic organizer. The lesson is introduced using fictitious digital media post as a platform to engage students to interact with the content.

This unit will help students understand why and how the Constitution was created, including: the original thirteen colonies and important historical figures present during the creation, the challenges and conflicts that state representatives faced during writing the Constitution, motifs and themes during the “Grand Convention,” and the relationship between state and national constitutions. Lessons will allow students to identify citizens’ civic duties outlined by the Constitution, the relationship between the federal and state Constitutions, and important historical symbols. Each part of the unit will include an in-depth dive into vocabulary and how it applies to the meaning of the text.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

A "Seal" of Approval: Coding and Civics Integration Part III:

This lesson is the final lesson in a three-part mini-unit on coding and integrated civics. In this integrated civics lesson, students will be using all of the research and information gathered from the lesson II planning and design sheet in order to create a program on Scratch that explains the different components of the Great Seal of the United States. 

Type: Lesson Plan

A "Seal" of Approval: Coding and Integrated Civics Part II:

This lesson plan serves as the second step in a series of a three-lesson mini-unit. Within this integrated civics lesson, students will begin the "unplugged" designing process of their Scratch coding project. Students will research the Great Seal of the United States and prepare to input the information gathered into their own project. 

Type: Lesson Plan

A "Seal" of Approval: Coding and Integrated Civics Part I:

This lesson plan serves as the first step in a series of a three-lesson mini-unit. Within this integrated civics lesson, students will become acclimated to the ways in which computer science, and more specifically coding, have the ability to share factual information about national symbols. 

Type: Lesson Plan

So What? What's the Big Deal about the "Star-Spangled Banner"?:

To understand the overarching themes of freedom and resiliency in the United States of American, students will identify and analyze the figurative language in the poem “Defence of Fort M’Henry” which turned into our National Anthem. After close reading and group consensus conversation, and possible extension exploration & research, a written or digital presentation which demonstrates students understanding of the “Star-Spangled Banner’s” significance as a symbol of the United States will be the resulting work product of this integrated lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Bill of Rights Visual and Manipulatives :

Students will use visuals to match descriptions of the Bill of Rights. Students will reflect on the impact of the Bill of Rights in a writing prompt. 

Type: Lesson Plan

American Symbols: Civics and Coding Part 3:

This is lesson 3 of 3 that will integrate ELA, Civics and Computer Science to create a visual presentation using Block coding with Scratch to demonstrate knowledge of the symbols within the Great Seal of the United States. In this lesson, students will use their template to code a Scratch program that explains the symbolism of the Great Seal of the United States. After developing their block coding, students will use the grading rubric to review for any errors, potential debugging, and suggest changes.

Type: Lesson Plan

U.S. SYMBOLS: “THE STAR-SPANGLED BANNER”:

This lesson provides students with the opportunity to read and recognize how the “Star-Spangled Banner” anthem, originally named, “Defense of Fort McHenry,” represents the United States. By analyzing how the poetic elements of rhyme and imagery contribute to the meaning of each of the verses of the Star-Spangled Banner, students will recognize the importance of this American symbol.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Seal, Bill, Song, and Proclamation: Recognizing Symbols of the United States :

In this lesson plan, students will explain how the Great Seal, Bill of Rights, Star-Spangled Banner, and Emancipation Proclamation represent the United States. Students will create their own symbols to represent themselves.

Type: Lesson Plan

A House Divided Cannot Stand:

In this student-centered activity, students will study the literal and figurative meanings of one of Abraham Lincoln’s famous metaphors, “A house divided cannot stand.” By participating in various station activities, students will analyze how the figurative meaning of the metaphor aligned with the message in Lincoln's Emancipation Proclamation.

Type: Lesson Plan

American Symbols: Civics and Coding Part 2:

This is lesson 2 of 3 that will integrate ELA, Civics and Computer Science to create a visual presentation using block coding with Scratch to demonstrate knowledge of the symbols within the Great Seal of the United States. In this lesson, students will use their research on the symbolism of the Great Seal to plan out a Scratch program that includes choosing a sprite and writing narration.

Type: Lesson Plan

American Symbols: Civics and Coding Part 1:

This is lesson 1 of 3 that will integrate ELA, Civics, and Computer Science to create a visual presentation using block coding with Scratch to demonstrate knowledge of the symbols within the Great Seal of the United States. This lesson will provide foundational information as students research and organize facts about the symbolism found in the Great Seal of the United States to determine how it illustrates the history of America.

Type: Lesson Plan

Teaching Idea

Grade 5 Civics Family Guide: Standard 2:

This Grade 5 Civics Family Guide provides some ideas and activities to support civics education when at home, out and about, and in the community. The activities provided align to the civics learning benchmarks within Standard 2 at this grade level.

Type: Teaching Idea

Video/Audio/Animation

Portraits in Patriotism - Luis Martínez Fernández: Elementary:

Luis Martínez-Fernández was born at the beginning of the Cuban Revolution. Dr. Martínez-Fernández immigrated to the United States with his family when he was 2 years old after the Bay of Pigs Invasion. His family moved to Lima, Peru after his father was offered employment there. Dr. Martínez-Fernández’s family left Peru after the President of Peru was ousted from power. The new government in Peru concerned Dr. Martínez-Fernández’s father and the family moved to Puerto Rico where they become U.S. Citizens. Dr. Martínez-Fernández moved to the U.S. after graduation from The University of Puerto Rico. He is a Professor of History, an author, and is civically engaged through his nationally syndicated column.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Teaching Idea

Grade 5 Civics Family Guide: Standard 2:

This Grade 5 Civics Family Guide provides some ideas and activities to support civics education when at home, out and about, and in the community. The activities provided align to the civics learning benchmarks within Standard 2 at this grade level.

Type: Teaching Idea