SS.3.CG.1.2

Describe how the U.S. government gains its power from the people.

Clarifications

Clarification 1: Students will recognize what is meant by “We the People” and “consent of the governed.”

Clarification 2: Students will identify sources of consent (e.g., voting and elections).

Clarification 3: Students will recognize that the U.S. republic is governed by the “consent of the governed” and government power is exercised through representatives of the people.

General Information
Subject Area: Social Studies
Grade: 3
Strand: Civics and Government
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5021050: Social Studies Grade 3 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
7721014: Access Social Studies - Grade 3 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
SS.3.CG.1.AP.2: Identify that government gains its power from the people.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

Democracy Detectives: Unveiling the Secret Words of the Preamble:

In this 3rd grade Social Studies lesson, students explore the Preamble of the Constitution and learn key terms related to it. Through discussions, examples, and group activities, students understand the meaning of terms such as "common," "constitution," and "justice." They also grasp the significance of phrases like "We the People" and "consent of the governed." The lesson emphasizes cooperation, fairness, and well-being within a community. Students actively participate, reflect on personal connections, and complete assessments to demonstrate their understanding. By the end of the lesson, students gain a deeper understanding of the Preamble, key terms, and the values that shape a fair and just society.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

Abraham Lincoln: Life of Honesty: Who's the Better President?:

This is lesson #9 in the text unit series for Abraham Lincoln: A Life of Honesty by Tonya Leslie. Students will research Abraham Lincoln and another United States President using the computer or books. They will then write an expository essay comparing and contrasting the two presidents.

This unit will help students explain why the United States Constitution is an important document that protects the rights of American citizens, the responsibilities of the United States government, and how Abraham Lincoln is an important symbol of the United States Government.

Students will engage in a read aloud spread out over several lessons emphasizing vocabulary, central idea, research, expository and opinion writing, and collaboration in groups.

The teacher will facilitate vocabulary instruction, student research, determination of central ideas, student presentation, expository and opinion writing, and group collaboration to help students demonstrate why the United States Constitution is an important document.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Abraham Lincoln: Life of Honesty: Was Abraham Lincoln an Effective U.S. President?:

This is lesson #4 in the text unit series for Abraham Lincoln: A Life of Honesty by Tonya Leslie. Students will write an opinion paragraph about whether or not they think Abraham Lincoln was an effective U.S. President.

This unit will help students explain why the United States Constitution is an important document that protects the rights of American citizens, the responsibilities of the United States government, and how Abraham Lincoln is an important symbol of the United States Government.

Students will engage in a read aloud spread out over several lessons emphasizing vocabulary, central idea, research, expository and opinion writing, and collaboration in groups.

The teacher will facilitate vocabulary instruction, student research, determination of central ideas, student presentation, expository and opinion writing, and group collaboration to help students demonstrate why the United States Constitution is an important document.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Vote: Lesson 7 Election Time:

This is Lesson 7 in the text unit series for Vote! by Eileen Christelow. After a close read of pages 30-33 of the text, students will have the opportunity to voice their choice by voting. Students will create their own ballot to vote on a topic, and then host a mini election in class. Students will also focus on summarizing the text using the central idea and relevant details.

This unit will explain voting in the United States. Unit lessons include duties of responsible citizens for voting, the voting process, responsibilities of candidates, and voting outcomes. Teacher will utilize a read aloud over several lessons incorporating text structure, text features, figurative language, and the use of multimedia in presentations. Teachers will facilitate research to help students create a presentation.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Governments! What are they good for? Absolutely something!:

This resource goes over the purpose of government from the smallest units (families) to the larger ones (countries).  Students then focus on the United States Constitution and explain the concept of "we the people" and "consent of the governed."

Type: Lesson Plan

Why Vote? :

In this lesson plan, students will explore the purpose of voting and how it impacts their community. The lesson's warm-up examines voting in a classroom to elicit student prior knowledge. The next activity allows students to learn more about the voting process through a "gallery walk." The concluding activity requires students to put their knowledge into action by creating a poster to encourage people to vote. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Who Are The “We” of We the People? :

In this lesson plan, teachers will assist students in describing the concepts of consent, representation, and the interaction between the needs of the people and responsiveness of government.

Type: Lesson Plan

Teaching Idea

Grade 3 Civics Family Guide: Standard 1:

This Grade 3 Civics Family Guide provides some ideas and activities to support civics education when at home, out and about, and in the community. The activities provided align to the civics learning benchmarks within Standard 1 at this grade level.

Type: Teaching Idea

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Teaching Idea

Grade 3 Civics Family Guide: Standard 1:

This Grade 3 Civics Family Guide provides some ideas and activities to support civics education when at home, out and about, and in the community. The activities provided align to the civics learning benchmarks within Standard 1 at this grade level.

Type: Teaching Idea