SC.1.L.17.1

Through observation, recognize that all plants and animals, including humans, need the basic necessities of air, water, food, and space.
General Information
Subject Area: Science
Grade: 1
Body of Knowledge: Life Science
Idea: Level 1: Recall
Big Idea: Interdependence -

A. Plants and animals, including humans, interact with and depend upon each other and their environment to satisfy their basic needs.

B. Both human activities and natural events can have major impacts on the environment.

C. Energy flows from the sun through producers to consumers.

Date Adopted or Revised: 02/08
Content Complexity Rating: Level 1: Recall - More Information
Date of Last Rating: 05/08
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5020020: Science Grade One (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
7720020: Access Science Grade 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 and beyond (current))
5020080: STEM Lab Grade 1 (Specifically in versions: 2016 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
SC.1.L.17.In.1: Observe and recognize that plants and animals need water and food.
SC.1.L.17.Su.1: Observe and recognize that plants and animals need water.
SC.1.L.17.Pa.1: Observe and recognize that people need water.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

Gr. 1 Lesson 2-The Everglades-Florida's Treasure:

The Everglades-Florida's Treasure is lesson 2 in a series of 3 lessons. Students will be introduced to the relationships between the wildlife and plants that live in different habitats of the Everglades. They will sort cards of plants and animals that live in each habitat.

Type: Lesson Plan

Gr. 1 Lesson 3-Water For Us All:

Students will look at the different places water comes from and the different ways humans use water. They will label different water bodies and match pictures of human and animal uses of water.

Type: Lesson Plan

Butterfly Trail:

Students will use a realistic scenario in order to create a Butterfly Trail for their school. The students will be required to activate prior knowledge, brainstorm independently, and also collaborate within cooperative groups to create a model to explain their reasoning.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Friendly Aquarium:

The Effects of Pollution: What are the effects that pollution has on living things? Students will learn that pollution is anything that makes air, land, or water dirty. They will become aware that human activities have a big impact on other living things in a number of different ecosystems.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Flower Garden:

The students will determine which flowers are the best to plant in a flower garden. The students will receive data about the hardiness of each flower, the amount of sun and water each needs, and the number of flowers each plant will produce. Students may choose a plant that produces many flowers but may not be very hardy.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Planting Vegetables After a Storm:

In this open-ended question, students in teams will make decisions about how to rank vegetables to plant on a farm. The students' decisions will be based on various criteria, such as most liked, easier to grow, cost and quantity of vegetables per harvest.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Butterfly Life Cycle: Biography of a Caterpillar :

Students observe and write about the life cycle of a caterpillar. A K-W-L chart is utilized to begin discussion, as well as Eric Carle's The Very Hungry Caterpillar.

Type: Lesson Plan

How Does Your Garden Grow?:

This lesson is a fun way to introduce factors that influence the growth of living things. The students read The Garden by Arnold Lobel. Then the students plant seeds to discover what makes them grow.

Type: Lesson Plan

Hatching Chickens:

This lesson will help students understand the importance of carefully observing and caring for eggs and chickens in the classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Microhabitats:

In this lesson, students explore the surroundings of the school and observe different types of habitats, recording the environment and what conditions allow animals and plants to thrive there.

Type: Lesson Plan

Catching a Balance Diet:

In this lesson students learn the importance of eating balanced meals and selecting foods the that make up a balanced meal by playing a fishing game.

Type: Lesson Plan

Good Enough to Eat? :

Students will work as a team to rank school lunch items from the most nutritious to the least nutritious.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Lesson Study Resource Kit

Diversity and Evolution grades K-2:

This resource kit is designed to facilitate K-2 teachers in the development of a unit of instruction that is focused on diversity, adaptation, and classification of living things. Complete with background information for teachers as well as engaging activities and lessons for students, this kit contains exemplary materials includes recommendations for informational texts that align with standards for English language arts.

Type: Lesson Study Resource Kit

Resource Collection

BioEd Online K-2 Educational Resources for Educators, Students, and Parents:

Biology lesson plans for a Living Things Unit of study.

Type: Resource Collection

Teaching Ideas

The Air We Breathe:

This is a PDF file from the NASA site featuring an online book all about air. This resource can be used as an engage to an activity, to supplement an activity, or as a great review for the completion of an activity. It covers great facts about the Earth's atmosphere and how people, plants, and animals are all dependent on oxygen. The dialogue also rhymes, which provides a great tie into Language Arts.

Type: Teaching Idea

A Shrimpy Home-SeaWorld Classroom Activity:

In this activity, students will demonstrate how changes in an environment can affect the survival of an animal.

Type: Teaching Idea

Antarctic Food Chain Song-SeaWorld Classroom Activity:

In this activity, students describe an antarctic food chain through the use of song.

Type: Teaching Idea

Survivor-SeaWorld Classroom Activity:

In this activity, students investigate how a sea lion pup's behavior is important for its survival.

Type: Teaching Idea

Unit/Lesson Sequences

Learning About Mealworms:

In this unit, students learn about metamorphosis and how animals change from birth to the adult stage through observing and collecting data as mealworm larvae progress through their life cycle to the adult stage (beetles).

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

Sun and Me:

This series of activities was developed by the Florida Solar Energy Center, a research institute of the University of Central Florida. The purpose of this unit is to create an awareness of the power of solar energy, the importance of it in our lives, and its impact on the future of energy development.

Type: Unit/Lesson Sequence

STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

Butterfly Trail:

Students will use a realistic scenario in order to create a Butterfly Trail for their school. The students will be required to activate prior knowledge, brainstorm independently, and also collaborate within cooperative groups to create a model to explain their reasoning.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Flower Garden:

The students will determine which flowers are the best to plant in a flower garden. The students will receive data about the hardiness of each flower, the amount of sun and water each needs, and the number of flowers each plant will produce. Students may choose a plant that produces many flowers but may not be very hardy.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Friendly Aquarium:

The Effects of Pollution: What are the effects that pollution has on living things? Students will learn that pollution is anything that makes air, land, or water dirty. They will become aware that human activities have a big impact on other living things in a number of different ecosystems.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Good Enough to Eat? :

Students will work as a team to rank school lunch items from the most nutritious to the least nutritious.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Planting Vegetables After a Storm:

In this open-ended question, students in teams will make decisions about how to rank vegetables to plant on a farm. The students' decisions will be based on various criteria, such as most liked, easier to grow, cost and quantity of vegetables per harvest.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Resource Collection

BioEd Online K-2 Educational Resources for Educators, Students, and Parents:

Biology lesson plans for a Living Things Unit of study.

Type: Resource Collection