MA.5.M.2.1

Solve multi-step real-world problems involving money using decimal notation.

Examples

Don is at the store and wants to buy soda. Which option would be cheaper: buying one 24-ounce can of soda for $1.39 or buying two 12-ounce cans of soda for 69¢ each?
General Information
Subject Area: Mathematics (B.E.S.T.)
Grade: 5
Strand: Measurement
Date Adopted or Revised: 08/20
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5012070: Grade Five Mathematics (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
7712060: Access Mathematics Grade 5 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5012065: Grade 4 Accelerated Mathematics (Specifically in versions: 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5012015: Foundational Skills in Mathematics 3-5 (Specifically in versions: 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
MA.5.M.2.AP.1: Solve one- and two-step addition and subtraction real-world problems involving money using decimal notation with all terms less than $20.00 (e.g., $11.74 + $5.31, $10.99 − $3.26).

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Educational Game

Change Maker:

This interactive applet gives students practice in making change in U.S. dollars and in four other currencies. Students are presented with a purchase amount and the amount paid, and they must enter the quantity of each denomination that make up the correct change. Students are rewarded for correct answers and are shown the correct change if they err. There are four levels of difficulty, ranging from amounts less than a dollar to amounts over $100.

Type: Educational Game

Formative Assessment

Buying Candy Bars:

Students are asked to solve a word problem involving multiplication of a decimal by a whole number using a model or drawing or a strategy based on place value, the relationship between multiplication and division, or properties of operations.

Type: Formative Assessment

Lesson Plans

Florida Food Round Up!:

Most families must buy food and household items that they will need every few weeks. Instead of randomly throwing things into a shopping cart and paying whatever the total is, many families must stick carefully to a predetermined budget to buy all of the items they need. A helpful way to make sure that you are able to buy everything needed is to use a list that is written before going shopping. Families must also determine, if they will purchase "name brand" or "store brand" products. Today, students will practice using a grocery list with a predetermined budget as they add and subtract decimals.

Type: Lesson Plan

Hoverama:

In this lesson students will create a model hovercraft. The challenge is to lift the most mass. Students will use their knowledge of forces and how increased mass interacts with motion. They will need to follow a budget in order to purchase building material for their hovercraft. While budgeting, students will apply real world mathematical (money) problem solving. Students will use iPads to record and document the process of the engineering and building of their model hovercrafts.

Type: Lesson Plan

Icky, Icky, No More Slicky:

In this lesson, 5th grade students will build an engineering device to separate oil from water in a simulated oil spill. Students will have an opportunity to learn about the impact that humans can have on the environment, both positively and negatively.

This is an Engineering Design Challenge that is best used after a unit or lesson that is aligned to science standards on solving problems or materials which dissolve in water. This challenge provides students a means to use their knowledge of the way materials will or will not dissolve in water to create and design an oil spill removal tool while learning the Engineering Design Process and being exposed to the field of engineering. This lesson is not intended as an initial introduction to the standard and would be best utilized as a culmination lesson.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Coasta with the Mosta:

Students will create an exciting and thrilling roller coaster model. Students will use their knowledge of forces to build a model of a roller coaster using foam insulation and a marble.

Type: Lesson Plan

When the Wind Blows:

This is an engineering design process lesson that covers forces and motion. It is designed to engage students using hands-on problem solving strategies.

Type: Lesson Plan

Bottling Rockets:

In this lesson, students will explore the concepts of force and motion as they use the engineering design process to create and test rockets. Students will demonstrate their understanding of familiar forces by creating and presenting a poster. Take students up, up, and away with this engaging lesson!

Type: Lesson Plan

From Trash to Treasure - An Engineering Design Challenge:

This lesson gives students hands-on experience with sorting mixtures based on their properties. The students will relate these science standards to a real-world problem of eliminating trash in land fills. They will have to purchase the tools they use to create their assembly line to sort the garbage within the budget provided.

Type: Lesson Plan

Bridge Over Troubled Waters:

In this engineering lesson, students will design and construct a bridge that will be free-standing and support a toy car.

Type: Lesson Plan

Medic Mass Landing: Engineering Design Challenge:

In this lesson, 5th grade students work in small groups on a STEM challenge that involves science and math standards related to force, motion, and measurement, as well as learning the engineering design process.

Type: Lesson Plan

How Much Did I Earn? Division with Decimals:

This lesson will introduce division of decimals using place value decomposition. Students will use base 10 blocks, division strategies and place value knowledge to divide decimals by whole numbers.

Type: Lesson Plan

Shopping for My Trip to the Beach:

This lesson will provide practice in adding/subtracting decimals in money form.  Student will model with base-ten blocks and then using the standard algorithm, through the hundredths place. This is not an introductory lesson. Students should already have conceptual knowledge and practice adding four-digit numbers using manipulatives or other methods.

Type: Lesson Plan

Deft Drawings for Decimal Division:

In this lesson, students divide decimals to hundredths in real-world word problems by drawing illustrations based on place value and explaining the reasoning used.

Type: Lesson Plan

Blessings in a Bag!!:

In this MEA, the students will help a charitable organization select 5 snack items from a list to provide nutritious snacks for children in low-income communities.  Students will practice using the four operations to solve real-world problems and use decimal notation to make calculations involving money.  Additionally, they will be asked to compare multi-digit numbers to the thousandths.

Type: Lesson Plan

Getting the Top Mini-Fridge not a Small Deal:

In this MEA, students will create a procedure to rank five mini-refrigerators to determine which one should be purchased for the school by the PTA based on size, type, features, energy usage, and cost.  In the process, students will solve real-world problems involving the multiplication of multi-digit numbers with decimals to the hundredths, including using money.  Students will also determine the volume of a rectangular prism using a formula.

Type: Lesson Plan

Buy Buy Toy Store is Relocating:

This is a Model Eliciting Activity in which students are asked to assist a toy company in ranking several cities for them to consider where they will open their next store. They also read data and apply multiplication skills.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

To Oregon by Wagon:

Students work in teams to plan the contents of a covered wagon for a family relocating from Missouri to Oregon. Students must calculate the weight and cost of the wagon by adding, subtracting, and multiplying with decimals.

Type: Lesson Plan

Bill of Rights Billboard:

This MEA will deepen students' knowledge of the Bill of Rights through collaborative problem solving. Students are required to analyze data in order to recommend three Amendments to celebrate during a community festival.  They will perform operations with fractions and mixed numbers to recommend advertising options for the festival within a budget.

Type: Lesson Plan

Out to Lunch: Decimal Operations with a Menu:

In this lesson students work toward fluency with decimal operations by using a snack bar menu and going "Out to Lunch" with a friend.

Type: Lesson Plan

Supermarket Sweep!:

In this lesson, students will use a grocery store ad to select items for purchase, working within the constraint of making their purchases with a $50 gift card. After their initial plan, they have some emergency expenses that change the amount of the gift card unexpectedly, and they must alter their list and re-compute how much money would remain on their gift card after their planned purchases are made.


Type: Lesson Plan

Currency Craze!:

If I travel to Italy, can I buy a raspberry gelato with a $5.00 bill? Students will understand that other countries use currencies different from the United States, and that when visiting those countries, exchange rates are used to determine the value of the United States dollar (USD). This lesson integrates Mathematics with Social Studies as the students apply their knowledge of decimals and basic operations with their passports for a real-world application.

Type: Lesson Plan

Are You Ready for a Hurricane?:

This activity allows students to determine the types of items that should be in a hurricane survival kit, use a budget and calculations to determine the items to include in the kit and gain an understanding of hurricanes and the need to prepare for them.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Shopping on a Budget:

This lesson reinforces multiplication of money by a whole number. Students will be presented with real-world items such as cans of soup, etc to investigate the concept of multiplying decimals. The culminating activity of the lesson is for students to create a school supply order for their classroom utilizing school supply catalogs.

Type: Lesson Plan

“Dinner with Friends”:

The students will determine what to order at a dinner with friends yet stay within a budget. The students will try to maximize their budgets and order as much food as they possibly can with their given amount of money.

Type: Lesson Plan

Wallpaper Woes Money Math: Lessons for Life:

Students hear a story about a middle-school student who wants to redecorate his bedroom. They measure the classroom wall dimensions, draw a scale model, and incorporate measurements for windows and doors to determine the area that could be covered by wallpaper. Students then hear more about the student's redecorating adventure and learn about expenses, budget constraints, and tradeoffs.

Type: Lesson Plan

Problem-Solving Tasks

Carnival Tickets:

The purpose of this task is for students to solve multi-step problems in a context involving a concept that supports financial literacy, namely inflation. Inflation is a sustained increase in the average price level. In this task, students can see that if the price level increases and people’s incomes do not increase, they aren’t able to purchase as many goods and services; in other words, their purchasing power decreases.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

What is 23 ÷ 5?:

When a division problem involving whole numbers does not result in a whole number quotient, it is important for students to be able to decide whether the context requires the result to be reported as a whole number with remainder (as with Part (b)) or a mixed number/decimal (as with Part (c)). Part (a) presents two variations on a context that require these two different responses to highlight the distinction between them.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Tutorial

Units of Measurement Word Problem: Making Change:

This Khan Academy tutorial video presents a strategy for computing the amount of change to be received after making a purchase.

Type: Tutorial

STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

Are You Ready for a Hurricane?:

This activity allows students to determine the types of items that should be in a hurricane survival kit, use a budget and calculations to determine the items to include in the kit and gain an understanding of hurricanes and the need to prepare for them.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Bill of Rights Billboard:

This MEA will deepen students' knowledge of the Bill of Rights through collaborative problem solving. Students are required to analyze data in order to recommend three Amendments to celebrate during a community festival.  They will perform operations with fractions and mixed numbers to recommend advertising options for the festival within a budget.

Blessings in a Bag!!:

In this MEA, the students will help a charitable organization select 5 snack items from a list to provide nutritious snacks for children in low-income communities.  Students will practice using the four operations to solve real-world problems and use decimal notation to make calculations involving money.  Additionally, they will be asked to compare multi-digit numbers to the thousandths.

Buy Buy Toy Store is Relocating:

This is a Model Eliciting Activity in which students are asked to assist a toy company in ranking several cities for them to consider where they will open their next store. They also read data and apply multiplication skills.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Getting the Top Mini-Fridge not a Small Deal:

In this MEA, students will create a procedure to rank five mini-refrigerators to determine which one should be purchased for the school by the PTA based on size, type, features, energy usage, and cost.  In the process, students will solve real-world problems involving the multiplication of multi-digit numbers with decimals to the hundredths, including using money.  Students will also determine the volume of a rectangular prism using a formula.

To Oregon by Wagon:

Students work in teams to plan the contents of a covered wagon for a family relocating from Missouri to Oregon. Students must calculate the weight and cost of the wagon by adding, subtracting, and multiplying with decimals.

MFAS Formative Assessments

Buying Candy Bars:

Students are asked to solve a word problem involving multiplication of a decimal by a whole number using a model or drawing or a strategy based on place value, the relationship between multiplication and division, or properties of operations.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Educational Game

Change Maker:

This interactive applet gives students practice in making change in U.S. dollars and in four other currencies. Students are presented with a purchase amount and the amount paid, and they must enter the quantity of each denomination that make up the correct change. Students are rewarded for correct answers and are shown the correct change if they err. There are four levels of difficulty, ranging from amounts less than a dollar to amounts over $100.

Type: Educational Game

Problem-Solving Tasks

Carnival Tickets:

The purpose of this task is for students to solve multi-step problems in a context involving a concept that supports financial literacy, namely inflation. Inflation is a sustained increase in the average price level. In this task, students can see that if the price level increases and people’s incomes do not increase, they aren’t able to purchase as many goods and services; in other words, their purchasing power decreases.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

What is 23 ÷ 5?:

When a division problem involving whole numbers does not result in a whole number quotient, it is important for students to be able to decide whether the context requires the result to be reported as a whole number with remainder (as with Part (b)) or a mixed number/decimal (as with Part (c)). Part (a) presents two variations on a context that require these two different responses to highlight the distinction between them.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Tutorial

Units of Measurement Word Problem: Making Change:

This Khan Academy tutorial video presents a strategy for computing the amount of change to be received after making a purchase.

Type: Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Problem-Solving Tasks

Carnival Tickets:

The purpose of this task is for students to solve multi-step problems in a context involving a concept that supports financial literacy, namely inflation. Inflation is a sustained increase in the average price level. In this task, students can see that if the price level increases and people’s incomes do not increase, they aren’t able to purchase as many goods and services; in other words, their purchasing power decreases.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

What is 23 ÷ 5?:

When a division problem involving whole numbers does not result in a whole number quotient, it is important for students to be able to decide whether the context requires the result to be reported as a whole number with remainder (as with Part (b)) or a mixed number/decimal (as with Part (c)). Part (a) presents two variations on a context that require these two different responses to highlight the distinction between them.

Type: Problem-Solving Task