MA.3.GR.2.1

Explore area as an attribute of a two-dimensional figure by covering the figure with unit squares without gaps or overlaps. Find areas of rectangles by counting unit squares.

Clarifications

Clarification 1: Instruction emphasizes the conceptual understanding that area is an attribute that can be measured for a two-dimensional figure. The measurement unit for area is the area of a unit square, which is a square with side length of 1 unit.

Clarification 2: Two-dimensional figures cannot exceed 12 units by 12 units and responses include the appropriate units in word form (e.g., square centimeter or sq.cm.).

General Information
Subject Area: Mathematics (B.E.S.T.)
Grade: 3
Strand: Geometric Reasoning
Date Adopted or Revised: 08/20
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5012050: Grade Three Mathematics (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
7712040: Access Mathematics Grade 3 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5012055: Grade 3 Accelerated Mathematics (Specifically in versions: 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5012015: Foundational Skills in Mathematics 3-5 (Specifically in versions: 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
MA.3.GR.2.AP.1: Explore area as an attribute of a two-dimensional figure that can be measured by covering the figure with unit squares without gaps or overlaps.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Formative Assessments

Complete the Rectangle:

Students are given a rectangle with one column and one row of unit squares (same size squares) drawn. Students are asked to complete and then find the total number of same size squares in the partition.

Type: Formative Assessment

How Many Units?:

Students are given a rectangle with some columns and rows partially constructed. Students are asked to find how many same-size squares are in the rectangle.

Type: Formative Assessment

Construct Rows and Columns:

Students are given a rectangle with tick marks drawn horizontally on one side of the rectangle and vertically on the bottom of the rectangle. Students are asked to partition the rectangle into columns and rows and then determine how many unit squares (same-size squares) are in the rectangle.

Type: Formative Assessment

Partition the Rectangle Into Unit Squares:

Students are given a rectangle with one unit square (same size square) drawn in the corner of the rectangle. Students are asked to draw the remaining unit squares and then find the total number of unit squares in the rectangle.

Type: Formative Assessment

Using Tiles of Different Sizes:

Students consider whether tiling a rectangle with different sized tiles is appropriate when calculating area.

Type: Formative Assessment

Unit Square:

Students are asked to explain how the area of a rectangle can be calculated and their responses are examined for references to the unit square as the unit of measurement.

Type: Formative Assessment

Overlapping Tiles:

Students are asked to evaluate another student's area calculation that involves overlapping tiles.

Type: Formative Assessment

Calculating Area:

Students discuss the meaning of area and are asked about the kinds of figures for which area can be calculated.

Type: Formative Assessment

Dawn’s Vegetable Garden:

Students are given a diagram showing a garden shaped like an irregular hexagon and are asked to find the area by counting the number of unit squares the figure contains.

Type: Formative Assessment

Area of a Right Trapezoid:

Students determine the area of a right trapezoid.

Type: Formative Assessment

How Many Square Units?:

Students determine the area of a right triangle.

Type: Formative Assessment

Fenced Dog Run:

Students are given a diagram showing a rectangular dog run and asked to find its area.

Type: Formative Assessment

Lesson Plans

Area Architects, Lesson 1:

In this unit on area, students explore geometric measurement by becoming "Area Architects" in order to learn the concepts of area. Using all five lessons will allow the students to discover, explore and eventually relate area to multiplication and addition. This lesson is the first lesson of the unit. In Lesson 1, students will develop strategies for finding area by counting square units. Students will learn the importance of accurately measuring area by exploring the concepts of area in realistic applications.

Type: Lesson Plan

Best Vegetable Garden:

The students will plan a vegetable garden, deciding which kinds of vegetables to plant, how many plants of each kind will fit, and where each plant will be planted in a fixed-area garden design. Then they will revise their design based on new garden dimensions and additional plant options.  Students will explore the concept of area to plan their garden and they will practice solving 1 and 2-step real-world problems using the four operations to develop their ideas.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Same Perimeter, Different Area:

In this lesson, students are presented with a problem that requires them to create rectangles with the same perimeter but different areas.  Students also search for relationships among the perimeters and areas of different rectangles and find which characteristics produce a rectangle with the greatest area.

Type: Lesson Plan

What Does Your Garden Grow?:

In this model eliciting activity students use data about the temperature and water requirements of plants to figure out when the plants should be planted. They also use data such as space requirements and time until harvest to make judgments about which plants would best suit the needs of students planning a school garden in Florida.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Playground Protection:

Students will decide which type of protective surface should be put in under a new playground unit. They will consider many factors before ranking their decisions about the best surface.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Area Isn't Just for Squares:

This lesson helps students make the connections between area and multiplication using square tiles.

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorials

Building a Square Garden:

Learn to identify one square unit that can be used to measure area in this brief interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Techies Talk Area:

Discover how square units can be used to cover the interior of a rectangle and measure its area of a rectangle in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

Best Vegetable Garden:

The students will plan a vegetable garden, deciding which kinds of vegetables to plant, how many plants of each kind will fit, and where each plant will be planted in a fixed-area garden design. Then they will revise their design based on new garden dimensions and additional plant options.  Students will explore the concept of area to plan their garden and they will practice solving 1 and 2-step real-world problems using the four operations to develop their ideas.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Playground Protection:

Students will decide which type of protective surface should be put in under a new playground unit. They will consider many factors before ranking their decisions about the best surface.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

What Does Your Garden Grow?:

In this model eliciting activity students use data about the temperature and water requirements of plants to figure out when the plants should be planted. They also use data such as space requirements and time until harvest to make judgments about which plants would best suit the needs of students planning a school garden in Florida.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

MFAS Formative Assessments

Area of a Right Trapezoid:

Students determine the area of a right trapezoid.

Calculating Area:

Students discuss the meaning of area and are asked about the kinds of figures for which area can be calculated.

Complete the Rectangle:

Students are given a rectangle with one column and one row of unit squares (same size squares) drawn. Students are asked to complete and then find the total number of same size squares in the partition.

Construct Rows and Columns:

Students are given a rectangle with tick marks drawn horizontally on one side of the rectangle and vertically on the bottom of the rectangle. Students are asked to partition the rectangle into columns and rows and then determine how many unit squares (same-size squares) are in the rectangle.

Dawn’s Vegetable Garden:

Students are given a diagram showing a garden shaped like an irregular hexagon and are asked to find the area by counting the number of unit squares the figure contains.

Fenced Dog Run:

Students are given a diagram showing a rectangular dog run and asked to find its area.

How Many Square Units?:

Students determine the area of a right triangle.

How Many Units?:

Students are given a rectangle with some columns and rows partially constructed. Students are asked to find how many same-size squares are in the rectangle.

Overlapping Tiles:

Students are asked to evaluate another student's area calculation that involves overlapping tiles.

Partition the Rectangle Into Unit Squares:

Students are given a rectangle with one unit square (same size square) drawn in the corner of the rectangle. Students are asked to draw the remaining unit squares and then find the total number of unit squares in the rectangle.

Unit Square:

Students are asked to explain how the area of a rectangle can be calculated and their responses are examined for references to the unit square as the unit of measurement.

Using Tiles of Different Sizes:

Students consider whether tiling a rectangle with different sized tiles is appropriate when calculating area.

Original Student Tutorials Mathematics - Grades K-5

Building a Square Garden:

Learn to identify one square unit that can be used to measure area in this brief interactive tutorial.

Techies Talk Area:

Discover how square units can be used to cover the interior of a rectangle and measure its area of a rectangle in this interactive tutorial.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Original Student Tutorials

Building a Square Garden:

Learn to identify one square unit that can be used to measure area in this brief interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Techies Talk Area:

Discover how square units can be used to cover the interior of a rectangle and measure its area of a rectangle in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.