MA.3.NSO.1.3

Plot, order and compare whole numbers up to 10,000.

Examples

The numbers 3,475; 4,743 and 4,753 can be arranged in ascending order as 3,475; 4,743 and 4,753.

Clarifications

Clarification 1: When comparing numbers, instruction includes using an appropriately scaled number line and using place values of the thousands, hundreds, tens and ones digits.

Clarification 2: Number lines, scaled by 50s, 100s or 1,000s, must be provided and can be a representation of any range of numbers.

Clarification 3: Within this benchmark, the expectation is to use symbols (<, > or =).

General Information
Subject Area: Mathematics (B.E.S.T.)
Grade: 3
Strand: Number Sense and Operations
Date Adopted or Revised: 08/20
Status: State Board Approved

Benchmark Instructional Guide

Connecting Benchmarks/Horizontal Alignment

Terms from the K-12 Glossary

  • Number Line 
  • Whole Number

Vertical Alignment

Previous Benchmarks

Next Benchmarks

Purpose and Instructional Strategies

This purpose of this benchmark is for students to compare two numbers by examining the place values of thousands, hundreds, tens and ones in each number. This work extends from the Grade 2 expectation to plot, order and compare up to 1,000 (MA.2.NSO.1.2). 
  • Instruction should use the terms greater than, less, than, and equal. Students should use place value strategies and number lines (horizontal and vertical) to justify how they compare numbers and explain their reasoning. Instruction should not rely on tricks for determining the direction of the inequality symbols. Students should read entire statements (e.g., read 7,309 > 7,039, “7,309 is greater than 7,039” and vice versa) (MTR.2.1, MTR.3.1). 
  • It is imperative for teachers to define the meaning of the ≠ symbol through instruction. It is recommend that students use = and ≠ symbols first. Once students have determined that numbers are not equal, then they can determine “how” they are not equal, with the understanding now the number is either < or >. If students cannot determine if amounts are ≠ or = then they will struggle with < or >. This will build understanding of statements of inequality and help students determine differences between inequalities and equations (MTR.6.1).

Common Misconceptions or Errors

  • Often students think of these relational symbols as operational symbols instead. In order to address this misconception, allow students to have practice using the number line and/or place value blocks to see the relationship between one number and the other.

Strategies to Support Tiered Instruction

  • Teacher uses a number line, base-ten blocks, place value charts and relational symbols to demonstrate the relationship between one number and the other. 
    • For example, the teacher uses a number line and relational symbols to compare 487 and 623, labeling the endpoints of the number line 0 and 1,000. The teacher asks students to place 487 and 623 on the number line, discussing the placement of the numbers and distance from zero. Next, the teacher uses the number line to demonstrate that 487 is closer to zero than 623 so 487 < 623 and that 623 is farther from zero so 623 > 487. Then, the teacher explains that 487 and 623 are not the same point on the number line so 487 ≠ 623 and asks students to identify numbers that are greater than... and less than.... Finally, the teacher repeats with two four-digit numbers (number line endpoints of 0 and 10,000) and discusses the placement of the other numbers on the number line and if their values are greater than or less than other numbers. 

a number line and relational symbols

    • For example, the teacher uses base-ten blocks, a place value chart and relational symbols to compare 274 and 312. The teacher begins by having students represent 274 and 312 using base-ten blocks and a place value chart and asking students to compare these numbers, beginning with the greatest place value. Next, the teacher explains that the number 274 has 2 hundreds and the number 312 has 3 hundreds so 274 < 312 and 312 > 274 and that 274 and 312 have different digits in the hundreds place so 274 ≠ 312.

Instructional Tasks

Instructional Task 1 

  • Plot the numbers 3,790, 3,890, 3,799, 3,809 on the number line below. 

number line

  • Choose two values from the list and compare them using >, <, or =. 
  • Choose a number between 3,799 and 3,809 and plot it on the number line. 
  • Use evidence from your number line to justify which number is greatest.

Instructional Items

Instructional Item 1 

  • Which of the following correctly compares 6,909 and 6,099? 
    • a. 6,909 < 6,099, because the value of the 9 in the tens place of 6,099 is greater than the value of the 0 in the tens place of 6,909.
    • b. 6,909 > 6,099, because the value of the 9 in the tens place of 6,099 is greater than the value of the 0 in the tens place of 6,909. 
    • c. 6,909 < 6,099, because the value of the 9 in the hundreds place of 6,909 is greater than the value of the 0 in the hundreds place of  6,099. 
    • d. 6,909 > 6,099, because the value of the 9 in the hundreds place of 6,909 is greater than the value of the 0 in the hundreds place of  6,099. 
*The strategies, tasks and items included in the B1G-M are examples and should not be considered comprehensive.

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5012050: Grade Three Mathematics (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
7712040: Access Mathematics Grade 3 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5012055: Grade 3 Accelerated Mathematics (Specifically in versions: 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5012015: Foundational Skills in Mathematics 3-5 (Specifically in versions: 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
MA.3.NSO.1.AP.3: Plot, order and compare whole numbers up to 1,000.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

I Vote, You Vote, We Vote:

In this lesson, students will analyze voting data and perform mathematical procedures to determine the answer to specific questions. Students will compare the population of the community vs. the number of votes counted. Students will discuss the contribution each citizen is making when voting and the effects on the results when citizens do not vote.

Type: Lesson Plan

Plot, Order, and Compare Dates in History:

Students will apply their understanding of place value to plot, order, and compare event descriptions related to key figures in history.  The key figures used in this lesson are James Madison, Alexander Hamilton, Booker T. Washington, Susan B. Anthony, William Pope Duval, William Dunn Mosely and Josiah T. Walls.  Students will make connections between using a number line to plot, order and compare numbers, to real-world careers that use timelines for historical purposes in this integrated lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Rounding Round and Round:

In this lesson, students will gain fluency with rounding numbers to the nearest 10s and 100s place. The lesson has number lines to help students understand rounding.

Type: Lesson Plan

Round the Number Line:

The focus of this lesson is to find the halfway point and use it to round numbers.  The lesson rounds numbers 0 to 100 to the nearest ten and 0 to 1000 to the nearest ten and hundred. 

Type: Lesson Plan

How Did the Baby Chick Cross the Road to Rounding?:

In this lesson, students will engage in tellling jokes and doing outside activities to discover rounding concepts. Students will use a vertical number line to round numbers from 0 to 1,000.

Type: Lesson Plan

Rounding Relay:

This lesson uses a relay game  to provide students with practice for their rounding skills.

Type: Lesson Plan

Problem-Solving Task

Ordering 4-digit numbers:

It is common for students to compare multi-digit numbers just by comparing the first digit, then the second digit, and so on. This task includes three-digit numbers with large hundreds digits and four-digit numbers with small thousands digits so that students must infer the presence of a 0 in the thousands place in order to compare. It also includes numbers with strategically placed zeros and an unusual request to order them from greatest to least in addition to the more traditional least to greatest.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Problem-Solving Task

Ordering 4-digit numbers:

It is common for students to compare multi-digit numbers just by comparing the first digit, then the second digit, and so on. This task includes three-digit numbers with large hundreds digits and four-digit numbers with small thousands digits so that students must infer the presence of a 0 in the thousands place in order to compare. It also includes numbers with strategically placed zeros and an unusual request to order them from greatest to least in addition to the more traditional least to greatest.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Problem-Solving Task

Ordering 4-digit numbers:

It is common for students to compare multi-digit numbers just by comparing the first digit, then the second digit, and so on. This task includes three-digit numbers with large hundreds digits and four-digit numbers with small thousands digits so that students must infer the presence of a 0 in the thousands place in order to compare. It also includes numbers with strategically placed zeros and an unusual request to order them from greatest to least in addition to the more traditional least to greatest.

Type: Problem-Solving Task