MA.2.M.2.2

Solve one- and two-step addition and subtraction real-world problems involving either dollar bills within $100 or coins within 100¢ using $ and ¢ symbols appropriately.

Clarifications

Clarification 1: Within this benchmark, the expectation is not to use decimal values.

Clarification 2: Addition and subtraction problems are limited to sums within 100 and related differences. Refer to Situations Involving Operations with Numbers (Appendix A).

General Information
Subject Area: Mathematics (B.E.S.T.)
Grade: 2
Strand: Measurement
Date Adopted or Revised: 08/20
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5012040: Mathematics - Grade Two (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
7712030: Access Mathematics Grade 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5012005: Foundational Skills in Mathematics K-2 (Specifically in versions: 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
MA.2.M.2.AP.2: Solve one-step addition and subtraction real-world problems involving either dollar bills within $20 or coins within 20¢. Explore using $ for dollar bills and ¢ symbol for coins.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Formative Assessments

Trip to the Movies:

Students are asked to solve a multistep word problem involving money.

Type: Formative Assessment

School Store:

Students are asked to solve a two-step word problem involving money in the form of coins.

Type: Formative Assessment

Combinations of Coins:

Students are asked to combine the values of coins and write the total value using the cent symbol.

Type: Formative Assessment

Combinations Of Bills:

Students are asked to combine the values of bills and write the total value using the dollar symbol.

Type: Formative Assessment

Fifty Cents Is Your Change:

Students consider two different ways to make fifty cents using quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies.

Type: Formative Assessment

Lesson Plans

Animal Sanctuary Engineering Design Challenge:

This Engineering Design Challenge is a hands-on investigation in both math and science. Students will be able to use prior knowledge and problem solving skills to solve non-routine problems and real-world situations, using mathematical and scientific models. It is a great way to introduce your students to real-world problem solving. Students will be engaged in hands-on learning by designing and creating an enclosure for zoo animals. Both math and science standards have been incorporated for an integrated lesson.

Type: Lesson Plan

Yum Pizza:

Yum Pizza is looking for a better and healthier pizza to sell in stores around town. They are only able to promote one style and need help figuring out which one that should be. Students will practice subtracting dollar amounts and writing a letter explaining their reasoning.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Our School Store:

The focus of this lesson is to devise a plan and justify it in order to choose the best school supply company. Students will use problem-solving skills, data sets presented in a chart, two- and three-digit addition, writing skills, and money skills to determine the best school supply company. Students will also need to check their procedure to determine if it will work when given additional data.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Better Building Blocks:

Students will help choose the best value of connecting blocks by developing a procedure based on the following criteria: color, ease of use, variety of blocks, and number of blocks per set. They will reassess these blocks during the twist incorporating a new type of block. They will need to calculate the total costs of each set of blocks.

Students may arrange the criteria based on their teams’ interpretation of most important to least important. Students may have to make trade-offs based on these interpretations (i.e., price versus the other criteria in the data sets).

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Kelly's Jelly:

Students use problem solving skills, data sets presented in a chart, two and three digit addition, writing skills and money skills to determine which brand of jelly beans they would like to purchase. The jelly beans differ in taste, quantity, and cost. The students must then check their procedure to determine if it will work when given an additional piece of data.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Help Ms. Betty!:

This Model Eliciting Activity is written at a second-grade level. In teams, students will make decisions about how to select the best cookie shop to help Ms. Betty with the purchasing of chocolate chip cookies while still being cost effective for her school.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Yummy Tummy Baby Food Company:

This Model Eliciting Activity is written at a second-grade level. In teams, students will make decisions about how to select the best baby food based on several characteristics. They will need to calculate the cost to produce two types of baby food.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Video Game City:

This Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) is written at a 2nd grade level. In this MEA students need to help the owner of Video Game City help his customers decide which gaming system best meets their needs. Students can consider the cost of each gaming system in their rankings. In part 2, students will need to add the cost of each gaming system and accessory.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorials

Let's Add Money: Place Value (Part 4):

Use place value and a tens and ones chart to add pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters in this interactive tutorial. 

This is part 4 of 5. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Let’s Add Money: Mixed Coins (Part 3):

Learn to add a combination of coins, such as quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies using a number line, skip counting, and a hundred chart in this interactive tutorial.

This interactive tutorial is part 3 of 5. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

Better Building Blocks:

Students will help choose the best value of connecting blocks by developing a procedure based on the following criteria: color, ease of use, variety of blocks, and number of blocks per set. They will reassess these blocks during the twist incorporating a new type of block. They will need to calculate the total costs of each set of blocks.

Students may arrange the criteria based on their teams’ interpretation of most important to least important. Students may have to make trade-offs based on these interpretations (i.e., price versus the other criteria in the data sets).

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Help Ms. Betty!:

This Model Eliciting Activity is written at a second-grade level. In teams, students will make decisions about how to select the best cookie shop to help Ms. Betty with the purchasing of chocolate chip cookies while still being cost effective for her school.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Kelly's Jelly:

Students use problem solving skills, data sets presented in a chart, two and three digit addition, writing skills and money skills to determine which brand of jelly beans they would like to purchase. The jelly beans differ in taste, quantity, and cost. The students must then check their procedure to determine if it will work when given an additional piece of data.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Our School Store:

The focus of this lesson is to devise a plan and justify it in order to choose the best school supply company. Students will use problem-solving skills, data sets presented in a chart, two- and three-digit addition, writing skills, and money skills to determine the best school supply company. Students will also need to check their procedure to determine if it will work when given additional data.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Video Game City:

This Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) is written at a 2nd grade level. In this MEA students need to help the owner of Video Game City help his customers decide which gaming system best meets their needs. Students can consider the cost of each gaming system in their rankings. In part 2, students will need to add the cost of each gaming system and accessory.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Yum Pizza:

Yum Pizza is looking for a better and healthier pizza to sell in stores around town. They are only able to promote one style and need help figuring out which one that should be. Students will practice subtracting dollar amounts and writing a letter explaining their reasoning.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Yummy Tummy Baby Food Company:

This Model Eliciting Activity is written at a second-grade level. In teams, students will make decisions about how to select the best baby food based on several characteristics. They will need to calculate the cost to produce two types of baby food.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

MFAS Formative Assessments

Combinations Of Bills:

Students are asked to combine the values of bills and write the total value using the dollar symbol.

Combinations of Coins:

Students are asked to combine the values of coins and write the total value using the cent symbol.

Fifty Cents Is Your Change:

Students consider two different ways to make fifty cents using quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies.

School Store:

Students are asked to solve a two-step word problem involving money in the form of coins.

Trip to the Movies:

Students are asked to solve a multistep word problem involving money.

Original Student Tutorials Mathematics - Grades K-5

Let’s Add Money: Mixed Coins (Part 3):

Learn to add a combination of coins, such as quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies using a number line, skip counting, and a hundred chart in this interactive tutorial.

This interactive tutorial is part 3 of 5. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Let's Add Money: Place Value (Part 4):

Use place value and a tens and ones chart to add pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters in this interactive tutorial. 

This is part 4 of 5. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Original Student Tutorials

Let's Add Money: Place Value (Part 4):

Use place value and a tens and ones chart to add pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters in this interactive tutorial. 

This is part 4 of 5. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Let’s Add Money: Mixed Coins (Part 3):

Learn to add a combination of coins, such as quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies using a number line, skip counting, and a hundred chart in this interactive tutorial.

This interactive tutorial is part 3 of 5. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.