MA.2.M.2.2

Solve one- and two-step addition and subtraction real-world problems involving either dollar bills within $100 or coins within 100¢ using $ and ¢ symbols appropriately.

Clarifications

Clarification 1: Within this benchmark, the expectation is not to use decimal values.

Clarification 2: Addition and subtraction problems are limited to sums within 100 and related differences. Refer to Situations Involving Operations with Numbers (Appendix A).

General Information
Subject Area: Mathematics (B.E.S.T.)
Grade: 2
Strand: Measurement
Date Adopted or Revised: 08/20
Status: State Board Approved

Benchmark Instructional Guide

Connecting Benchmarks/Horizontal Alignment

 

Terms from the K-12 Glossary

  • NA

 

Vertical Alignment

Previous Benchmarks

Next Benchmarks

 

Purpose and Instructional Strategies

The purpose of this benchmark is to include the use of dollars and cents to add or subtract in real-world problems (MTR.7.1). 
  • It is not the expectation of this benchmark to include combining cents with dollars. Students will explore that concept in grade 4 with the introduction of decimals. 
  • Instruction includes the use of drawing, manipulatives, and number lines to solve addition or subtraction situations. 
  • Instruction includes the idea that making change is the same as finding a difference. 
  • Instruction uses the format 45¢ not $0.45.

 

Common Misconceptions or Errors

  • Students may believe the value of a coin is directly related to its size.
    • For example, a student may think that since a nickel is bigger than a dime then it is worth more, or since a penny is bigger than a dime then it must also be worth more.

 

Strategies to Support Tiered Instruction

  • Instruction includes providing a way to organize information about coin values that can later be used to reference for finding the values of coin collections prior to counting. Students use images, drawings, words, sentences, phrases, numbers, and symbols to describe the equal values. 
    • For example, a chart can be used to include ways in which students can relate the equal values with other coins and dollar combinations so that students can begin to form connections to help them remember the values. Students use informal language to describe equal values such as, “is worth the same as.”

 

Instructional Tasks

Instructional Task 1 (MTR.7.1

Marco wants to buy three items from the school shop. The images below provide different items the school shop has in stock and its price. 

stationary from school shop

  • Part A. If Marco has $10 to spend, list all of the combinations of items he can purchase. Discuss your strategy to determine possible combinations. 
  • Part B. Which combination put them under/over budget?

 

Instructional Items

Instructional Item 1 

Whitney has 93¢ in her piggy bank. She empties her piggy bank for a trip to the store. She gives her brother three dimes, and her sister one quarter, the rest of the money is hers to spend. How much money does Whitney have left to spend at the store? 

 

Instructional Item 2 

Maya and Tanya earned $47 dollars from their bake sale. Each of the girls wants to buy a sweatshirt that costs $15 dollars. Once the sweatshirts are purchased, do the girls have enough money to buy one bag of candy that costs $4? Explain why or why not. 

 

*The strategies, tasks and items included in the B1G-M are examples and should not be considered comprehensive.

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5012040: Mathematics - Grade Two (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
7712030: Access Mathematics Grade 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5012005: Foundational Skills in Mathematics K-2 (Specifically in versions: 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
MA.2.M.2.AP.2: Solve one-step addition and subtraction real-world problems involving either dollar bills within $20 or coins within 20¢. Explore using $ for dollar bills and ¢ symbol for coins.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Formative Assessments

Trip to the Movies:

Students are asked to solve a multistep word problem involving money.

Type: Formative Assessment

School Store:

Students are asked to solve a two-step word problem involving money in the form of coins.

Type: Formative Assessment

Combinations of Coins:

Students are asked to combine the values of coins and write the total value using the cent symbol.

Type: Formative Assessment

Combinations Of Bills:

Students are asked to combine the values of bills and write the total value using the dollar symbol.

Type: Formative Assessment

Fifty Cents Is Your Change:

Students consider two different ways to make fifty cents using quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies.

Type: Formative Assessment

Lesson Plans

Trip to Statue of Liberty:

Students will discuss facts about the Statue of Liberty and take a virtual tour. Students will use tables of ferry ticket and food prices to solve one and two-step word problems involving money. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Animal Sanctuary Engineering Design Challenge:

This Engineering Design Challenge is a hands-on investigation in both math and science. Students will be able to use prior knowledge and problem solving skills to solve non-routine problems and real-world situations, using mathematical and scientific models. It is a great way to introduce your students to real-world problem solving. Students will be engaged in hands-on learning by designing and creating an enclosure for zoo animals. Both math and science standards have been incorporated for an integrated lesson.

Type: Lesson Plan

Let's Go Shopping - Counting, Adding, and Subtracting Coins:

Who doesn't love to shop?!? In this fun, interactive activity, students review how to count groups of coins, learn how to add and subtract groups of coins, and go "shopping" to buy items and determine how much change they would receive.

Type: Lesson Plan

Yum Pizza:

Yum Pizza is looking for a better and healthier pizza to sell in stores around town. They are only able to promote one style and need help figuring out which one that should be. Students will practice subtracting dollar amounts and writing a letter explaining their reasoning.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Roll a Dollar:

In this lesson, students will play the game, "Roll a Dollar", to try and make a dollar by trading in coins. The idea behind the game is for the students to learn various ways to use coins to make different amounts of money. Students will then explore all the different ways they can think of to make 25 cents.

Type: Lesson Plan

Show Me the Money:

In this lesson, students will show a variety of coin combinations for a specific amount of money.

Type: Lesson Plan

Our School Store:

The focus of this lesson is to devise a plan and justify it in order to choose the best school supply company. Students will use problem-solving skills, data sets presented in a chart, two- and three-digit addition, writing skills, and money skills to determine the best school supply company. Students will also need to check their procedure to determine if it will work when given additional data.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Better Building Blocks:

Students will help choose the best value of connecting blocks by developing a procedure based on the following criteria: color, ease of use, variety of blocks, and number of blocks per set. They will reassess these blocks during the twist incorporating a new type of block. They will need to calculate the total costs of each set of blocks.

Students may arrange the criteria based on their teams’ interpretation of most important to least important. Students may have to make trade-offs based on these interpretations (i.e., price versus the other criteria in the data sets).

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Kelly's Jelly:

Students use problem solving skills, data sets presented in a chart, two and three digit addition, writing skills and money skills to determine which brand of jelly beans they would like to purchase. The jelly beans differ in taste, quantity, and cost. The students must then check their procedure to determine if it will work when given an additional piece of data.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Party Anyone:

Students will demonstrate an understanding of solving story problems relating to money by creating their own story problem and answering story problems that were created by their peers. All story problems will be created based on the theme of planning a party and using ads from local businesses.

Type: Lesson Plan

Help Ms. Betty!:

This Model Eliciting Activity is written at a second-grade level. In teams, students will make decisions about how to select the best cookie shop to help Ms. Betty with the purchasing of chocolate chip cookies while still being cost effective for her school.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Yummy Tummy Baby Food Company:

This Model Eliciting Activity is written at a second-grade level. In teams, students will make decisions about how to select the best baby food based on several characteristics. They will need to calculate the cost to produce two types of baby food.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Video Game City:

This Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) is written at a 2nd grade level. In this MEA students need to help the owner of Video Game City help his customers decide which gaming system best meets their needs. Students can consider the cost of each gaming system in their rankings. In part 2, students will need to add the cost of each gaming system and accessory.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Coupon Clippers:

In this lesson, students will demonstrate their knowledge of coins by showing more than one way to represent a manufacturer's coupon. and solve a problem using that coupon. The students will respond to the following prompt in their interactive notebook: Why is it important to know more than one way to show an amount? How will it help you in your daily life?

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorials

Let's Add Money: Place Value (Part 4):

Use place value and a tens and ones chart to add pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters in this interactive tutorial. 

This is part 4 of 5. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Let’s Add Money: Mixed Coins (Part 3):

Learn to add a combination of coins, such as quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies using a number line, skip counting, and a hundred chart in this interactive tutorial.

This interactive tutorial is part 3 of 5. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Problem-Solving Tasks

Jamir's Penny Jar:

The purpose of this task is to help students articulate their addition strategies and would be most appropriately used once students have a solid understanding of coin values. This task would be best used in an instructional setting especially since the language is somewhat complex and the teacher might need to help students decode the task statement.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Ten $10s make $100:

The purpose of this task is for students to use currency to help better understand place value.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Saving Money 2:

The purpose of this task is for students to relate addition and subtraction problems to money and to situations and goals related to saving money. This task is an instructional task that brings many aspects of the mathematical work that second graders will be doing together with an opportunity to learn about financial literacy concepts.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Delayed Gratification:

The purpose of this task is for students to compare two options for a prize where the value of one is given $2 at a time, giving them an opportunity to "work with equal groups of objects to gain foundations for multiplication." This context also provides students with an introduction to the concept of delayed gratification, or resisting an immediate reward and waiting for a later reward, while working with money.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

A Pencil and a Sticker:

The purpose of this task is to represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction with the help of a bar diagram.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Saving Money 1:

The purpose of this task is for students to relate addition and subtraction problems to money and to situations and goals related to saving money. This task has students adding two 2-digit numbers that require regrouping and the solution shows a concrete approach to the solution. This problem can be adjusted based on where students are in their understanding of addition involving two-digit numbers.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Susan's Choice:

The purpose of this task is to address the concept of opportunity cost through a real world context involving money. In economics, resources are limited, but our wants are unlimited. Therefore, choices must be made. Every choice involves a cost.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

Better Building Blocks:

Students will help choose the best value of connecting blocks by developing a procedure based on the following criteria: color, ease of use, variety of blocks, and number of blocks per set. They will reassess these blocks during the twist incorporating a new type of block. They will need to calculate the total costs of each set of blocks.

Students may arrange the criteria based on their teams’ interpretation of most important to least important. Students may have to make trade-offs based on these interpretations (i.e., price versus the other criteria in the data sets).

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Help Ms. Betty!:

This Model Eliciting Activity is written at a second-grade level. In teams, students will make decisions about how to select the best cookie shop to help Ms. Betty with the purchasing of chocolate chip cookies while still being cost effective for her school.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Kelly's Jelly:

Students use problem solving skills, data sets presented in a chart, two and three digit addition, writing skills and money skills to determine which brand of jelly beans they would like to purchase. The jelly beans differ in taste, quantity, and cost. The students must then check their procedure to determine if it will work when given an additional piece of data.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Our School Store:

The focus of this lesson is to devise a plan and justify it in order to choose the best school supply company. Students will use problem-solving skills, data sets presented in a chart, two- and three-digit addition, writing skills, and money skills to determine the best school supply company. Students will also need to check their procedure to determine if it will work when given additional data.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Video Game City:

This Model Eliciting Activity (MEA) is written at a 2nd grade level. In this MEA students need to help the owner of Video Game City help his customers decide which gaming system best meets their needs. Students can consider the cost of each gaming system in their rankings. In part 2, students will need to add the cost of each gaming system and accessory.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Yum Pizza:

Yum Pizza is looking for a better and healthier pizza to sell in stores around town. They are only able to promote one style and need help figuring out which one that should be. Students will practice subtracting dollar amounts and writing a letter explaining their reasoning.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Yummy Tummy Baby Food Company:

This Model Eliciting Activity is written at a second-grade level. In teams, students will make decisions about how to select the best baby food based on several characteristics. They will need to calculate the cost to produce two types of baby food.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

MFAS Formative Assessments

Combinations Of Bills:

Students are asked to combine the values of bills and write the total value using the dollar symbol.

Combinations of Coins:

Students are asked to combine the values of coins and write the total value using the cent symbol.

Fifty Cents Is Your Change:

Students consider two different ways to make fifty cents using quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies.

School Store:

Students are asked to solve a two-step word problem involving money in the form of coins.

Trip to the Movies:

Students are asked to solve a multistep word problem involving money.

Original Student Tutorials Mathematics - Grades K-5

Let’s Add Money: Mixed Coins (Part 3):

Learn to add a combination of coins, such as quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies using a number line, skip counting, and a hundred chart in this interactive tutorial.

This interactive tutorial is part 3 of 5. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Let's Add Money: Place Value (Part 4):

Use place value and a tens and ones chart to add pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters in this interactive tutorial. 

This is part 4 of 5. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Original Student Tutorials

Let's Add Money: Place Value (Part 4):

Use place value and a tens and ones chart to add pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters in this interactive tutorial. 

This is part 4 of 5. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Let’s Add Money: Mixed Coins (Part 3):

Learn to add a combination of coins, such as quarters, dimes, nickels, and pennies using a number line, skip counting, and a hundred chart in this interactive tutorial.

This interactive tutorial is part 3 of 5. Click below to open the other tutorials in the series.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Problem-Solving Tasks

Ten $10s make $100:

The purpose of this task is for students to use currency to help better understand place value.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Saving Money 2:

The purpose of this task is for students to relate addition and subtraction problems to money and to situations and goals related to saving money. This task is an instructional task that brings many aspects of the mathematical work that second graders will be doing together with an opportunity to learn about financial literacy concepts.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Delayed Gratification:

The purpose of this task is for students to compare two options for a prize where the value of one is given $2 at a time, giving them an opportunity to "work with equal groups of objects to gain foundations for multiplication." This context also provides students with an introduction to the concept of delayed gratification, or resisting an immediate reward and waiting for a later reward, while working with money.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

A Pencil and a Sticker:

The purpose of this task is to represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction with the help of a bar diagram.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Saving Money 1:

The purpose of this task is for students to relate addition and subtraction problems to money and to situations and goals related to saving money. This task has students adding two 2-digit numbers that require regrouping and the solution shows a concrete approach to the solution. This problem can be adjusted based on where students are in their understanding of addition involving two-digit numbers.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Susan's Choice:

The purpose of this task is to address the concept of opportunity cost through a real world context involving money. In economics, resources are limited, but our wants are unlimited. Therefore, choices must be made. Every choice involves a cost.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Problem-Solving Tasks

Jamir's Penny Jar:

The purpose of this task is to help students articulate their addition strategies and would be most appropriately used once students have a solid understanding of coin values. This task would be best used in an instructional setting especially since the language is somewhat complex and the teacher might need to help students decode the task statement.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Ten $10s make $100:

The purpose of this task is for students to use currency to help better understand place value.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Saving Money 2:

The purpose of this task is for students to relate addition and subtraction problems to money and to situations and goals related to saving money. This task is an instructional task that brings many aspects of the mathematical work that second graders will be doing together with an opportunity to learn about financial literacy concepts.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Delayed Gratification:

The purpose of this task is for students to compare two options for a prize where the value of one is given $2 at a time, giving them an opportunity to "work with equal groups of objects to gain foundations for multiplication." This context also provides students with an introduction to the concept of delayed gratification, or resisting an immediate reward and waiting for a later reward, while working with money.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

A Pencil and a Sticker:

The purpose of this task is to represent and solve problems involving addition and subtraction with the help of a bar diagram.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Saving Money 1:

The purpose of this task is for students to relate addition and subtraction problems to money and to situations and goals related to saving money. This task has students adding two 2-digit numbers that require regrouping and the solution shows a concrete approach to the solution. This problem can be adjusted based on where students are in their understanding of addition involving two-digit numbers.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Susan's Choice:

The purpose of this task is to address the concept of opportunity cost through a real world context involving money. In economics, resources are limited, but our wants are unlimited. Therefore, choices must be made. Every choice involves a cost.

Type: Problem-Solving Task