MA.2.NSO.1.3

Plot, order and compare whole numbers up to 1,000.

Examples

The numbers 424, 178 and 475 can be arranged in ascending order as 178, 424 and 475.

Clarifications

Clarification 1: When comparing numbers, instruction includes using a number line and using place values of the hundreds, tens and ones digits.

Clarification 2: Within this benchmark, the expectation is to use terms (e.g., less than, greater than, between or equal to) and symbols (<, > or =).

General Information
Subject Area: Mathematics (B.E.S.T.)
Grade: 2
Strand: Number Sense and Operations
Date Adopted or Revised: 08/20
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5012040: Mathematics - Grade Two (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
7712030: Access Mathematics Grade 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5012005: Foundational Skills in Mathematics K-2 (Specifically in versions: 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
MA.2.NSO.1.AP.3: Plot, order and compare whole numbers up to 100.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Formative Assessments

Using Digits:

Students randomly pull five cards from a set of digit cards and use them to make the greatest and least three-digit numbers possible. They are also asked to use the greater than or less than symbols to compare the two numbers.

Type: Formative Assessment

Who Has More?:

Students are asked to compare two numbers used in a word problem and to write an inequality statement showing the relationship between the numbers.

Type: Formative Assessment

Inequalities Using Symbols:

Students are asked to compare numbers and then use the greater than, less than, or equal to symbols to complete inequality statements.

Type: Formative Assessment

Missing Digits:

Students are asked to compare numbers with missing digits and explain their reasoning.

Type: Formative Assessment

Lesson Plans

Pop, Pop, Pop!:

Students will research the effects of sugary drinks on their health.  They will interpret data on a variety of beverages presented in the form of bar graphs and decide which beverages should be included in school vending machines to ensure students have healthy drink options.

Type: Lesson Plan

Carnival:

Written at a second grade level, in this MEA the students will use problem solving skills, two-digit addition, and knowledge of greater than and less than to rank order carnival games based on provided criteria.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Crazy Crayons!:

In teams, students will make a decision on how to select the best crayons for a school supply store based on various crayon characteristics such as cost, transfer to paper, vibrancy of color, color residue, and breakage.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Restaurant Rankings: Which meal would you want to add to your cafeteria menu?:

The students have been selected by the cafeteria manager to help rank healthy meal options that have been proposed to be added to the school cafeteria. The students will use information about the food and drink included in the meal, total calories, sodium content, calories from saturated fat, and calories from sugar to come up with a procedure for ranking the meal options. Then students will have to use or adapt their original procedures to include two more meal options in the rankings.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Chocolate Delight:

Although, chocolate sales in America have continued to grow, due to the increased awareness of childhood obesity, there is major concern about the nutritional value of chocolate candy bars. Chocolate Delight, a chocolate bar company, wants to improve its sales to elementary students by creating a healthy chocolate bar. They have tested 5 new recipes and need to determine which candy bar is best for children. The students will rank the recipes from best to worst based on the following criteria: healthiness, taste, and nut allergies and make a recommendation of the healthiest recipe to Chocolate Delight.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

How Many Inches, Feet, and Yards?:

Students will measure the length of given objects using various measuring tools. The students will record their measurements using different units including inches, feet, and yards to the nearest whole unit. Students will also estimate and measure the lengths of objects, then compare their estimations to their measurements to find the difference.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorial

Tale of the Tallest Skyscraper:

Learn how to compare three-digit numbers using place value models, number lines and place value charts in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

STEM Lessons - Model Eliciting Activity

Carnival:

Written at a second grade level, in this MEA the students will use problem solving skills, two-digit addition, and knowledge of greater than and less than to rank order carnival games based on provided criteria.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Chocolate Delight:

Although, chocolate sales in America have continued to grow, due to the increased awareness of childhood obesity, there is major concern about the nutritional value of chocolate candy bars. Chocolate Delight, a chocolate bar company, wants to improve its sales to elementary students by creating a healthy chocolate bar. They have tested 5 new recipes and need to determine which candy bar is best for children. The students will rank the recipes from best to worst based on the following criteria: healthiness, taste, and nut allergies and make a recommendation of the healthiest recipe to Chocolate Delight.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Crazy Crayons!:

In teams, students will make a decision on how to select the best crayons for a school supply store based on various crayon characteristics such as cost, transfer to paper, vibrancy of color, color residue, and breakage.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Pop, Pop, Pop!:

Students will research the effects of sugary drinks on their health.  They will interpret data on a variety of beverages presented in the form of bar graphs and decide which beverages should be included in school vending machines to ensure students have healthy drink options.

Restaurant Rankings: Which meal would you want to add to your cafeteria menu?:

The students have been selected by the cafeteria manager to help rank healthy meal options that have been proposed to be added to the school cafeteria. The students will use information about the food and drink included in the meal, total calories, sodium content, calories from saturated fat, and calories from sugar to come up with a procedure for ranking the meal options. Then students will have to use or adapt their original procedures to include two more meal options in the rankings.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

MFAS Formative Assessments

Inequalities Using Symbols:

Students are asked to compare numbers and then use the greater than, less than, or equal to symbols to complete inequality statements.

Missing Digits:

Students are asked to compare numbers with missing digits and explain their reasoning.

Using Digits:

Students randomly pull five cards from a set of digit cards and use them to make the greatest and least three-digit numbers possible. They are also asked to use the greater than or less than symbols to compare the two numbers.

Who Has More?:

Students are asked to compare two numbers used in a word problem and to write an inequality statement showing the relationship between the numbers.

Original Student Tutorials Mathematics - Grades K-5

Tale of the Tallest Skyscraper:

Learn how to compare three-digit numbers using place value models, number lines and place value charts in this interactive tutorial.

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Original Student Tutorial

Tale of the Tallest Skyscraper:

Learn how to compare three-digit numbers using place value models, number lines and place value charts in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.