ELA.10.C.1.3

Write to argue a position, supporting claims using logical reasoning and credible evidence from multiple sources, rebutting counterclaims with relevant evidence, using a logical organizational structure, elaboration, purposeful transitions, and maintaining a formal and objective tone.

Clarifications

Clarification 1: See Writing Types and Elaborative Techniques.

Clarification 2: The tone should be both formal and objective, relying more on argument and rhetorical appeals rather than on propaganda techniques. Use narrative techniques to strengthen writing where appropriate.

General Information
Subject Area: English Language Arts (B.E.S.T.)
Grade: 10
Strand: Communication
Date Adopted or Revised: 08/20
Status: State Board Approved

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This benchmark is part of these courses.
0500310: Executive Internship 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
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2400310: Leadership Techniques Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2016, 2016 - 2020, 2020 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
1001350: English Honors 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1001810: Florida's Preinternational Baccalaureate English 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1002310: English 2 Through ESOL (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1005350: Literature and the Arts 1 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1020810: American Literature Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
1020850: World Literature Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
1006310: Journalism 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2021, 2021 and beyond (current))
1006320: Journalism 3 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1006330: Journalism 4 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1007310: Speech 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1007350: Debate 3 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1007360: Debate 4 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1009310: Writing 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1001340: English 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
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1002381: Developmental Language Arts Through ESOL (Reading) (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
7910125: Access English 2 (Specifically in versions: 2013 - 2015, 2015 - 2017, 2017 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1007315: Speech 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1005320: British Literature (Specifically in versions: 2018 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
1000414: Intensive Reading 2 (Specifically in versions: 2021 and beyond (current))
1005347: Humane Letters 2 Literature (Specifically in versions: 2020 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
1005348: Humane Letters 2 Literature Honors (Specifically in versions: 2020 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
ELA.10.C.1.AP.3: Argue a position, supporting claims using logical reasoning and credible evidence from multiple sources, rebutting counterclaims with relevant evidence, using a logical organizational structure, elaboration, purposeful transitions, and maintaining a formal and objective tone.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

Fahrenheit 451: Argumentative Writing:

In this lesson, students will read portions of Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury and analyze the theme of civic engagement and its impact on institutions by analyzing examples from the text and will reflect on the significance of these themes in both literature and society.

There are four lessons that can be used to complement a study of Fahrenheit 451 to help students take a new perspective by merging ELA skills with civics knowledge.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Conducting a Values Debate: Analyzing Foundational American Documents:

In this lesson, students will analyze, with partners, how to create a values debate argument. In order to do this, they will first look at excerpts from several foundational American documents and then use a worksheet to analyze, summarize, and incorporate the documents' components into a full values debates. Finally, they will pick their own values topic and prepare a brief argument both for and against that they will then argue with their partner based on a coin toss.

Type: Lesson Plan

Comparing Unsecured Loans:

Students will conduct research to identify, compare, and discuss characteristics of personal loans, student loans, and unsecured credit cards in this lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Comparing Secured Loans:

Students will conduct research to identify, compare, and discuss characteristics of auto loans, mortgages, and secured credit cards, in this lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Unsecured and Secured Loans:

Students will conduct research to identify characteristics of secured and unsecured loans, in this lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Monster or Not? Three Excerpts from Frankenstein:

In this lesson, students will read three extended text excerpts from Frankenstein in which the Creature is the narrator and view several clips from film adaptations of the Creature. The students will annotate during the reading of the text and determine the meaning of selected vocabulary words from the text. Students will engage in discussion on how the Creature changes and what causes those changes. As a summative assessment for the lesson, students will write an extended argumentative response with a claim about whether the Creature is monster-like or not.

Type: Lesson Plan

Creating Suspense Lesson 2: Analyzing Literary Devices in "The Lottery":

In this lesson (part 2 of 2 in a unit), students will read and analyze literary devices in Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery." Students will practice text-coding the story to note uses of setting, imagery, diction, and foreshadowing. Students will complete a handout where they will analyze how Jackson creates suspense through the use of setting, imagery, diction, and foreshadowing. For the summative assessment, students will write an essay comparing and contrasting Edgar Allan Poe's use of suspense with Jackson's, making a claim as to which author more successfully creates a suspenseful mood.

Type: Lesson Plan

A.I. In Our World:

Using the case study, “What if I Used A.I. To Build My Site?” students will research the historical, legal, and ethical impacts of A.I. and write an argument for or against the use of A.I. in a competitive business situation.

Type: Lesson Plan

Expanding the Business: Writing an Argument :

Using the case study, Should the Business Expand? students will create an argument for expanding the business or not expanding the business. Students will compose a business communication to the owner of the case study business that provides their argument for or against expansion, to include logical reasoning and evidence.  

Type: Lesson Plan

Teaching Ideas

SPAR Debates for Civic Engagement:

Using this activity intended for the debate classroom, students will engage in one or more short “SPAR” debates on a variety of topics related to the government’s role in balancing individual and public interests.

Type: Teaching Idea

What Are The Implications?:

This resource for the debate classroom will help students with informative speech. Students will examine a topic and convey ideas, concepts, and information through the selection, organization, and analysis of relevant content.

Type: Teaching Idea

Video/Audio/Animation

The Power of a Great Introduction:

In this animated video from TEDed, students will learn the process of writing an engaging and insightful introduction. They will also examine how to compose an introduction that is tailored to a specific thesis. Looking at Charles Dickens' Great Expectations, they will identify the fundamentals of writing a great introduction by examining this masterpiece.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.