ELA.K.C.5.1

Use a multimedia element to enhance oral or written tasks.

Clarifications

Clarification 1: Multimedia elements may include, but are not limited to, a drawing, picture, artifact, audio or digital representation.
Multimedia elements may include, but are not limited to, a drawing, picture, artifact, audio or digital representation. At this grade level, the element should relate to the task but that relationship may be tangential. It does not require but can include the use of computers.
General Information
Subject Area: English Language Arts (B.E.S.T.)
Grade: K
Strand: Communication
Date Adopted or Revised: 08/20
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5010030: Functional Basic Skills in Communications-Elementary (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5010041: Language Arts - Kindergarten (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021, 2021 and beyond (current))
7710011: Access Language Arts - Kindergarten (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5011000: Library Skills/Information Literacy Kindergarten (Specifically in versions: 2016 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
5010100: Introduction to Debate Kindergarten (Specifically in versions: 2020 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5010011: English for Speakers of Other Languages Kindergarten (Specifically in versions: 2021 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
ELA.K.C.5.AP.1: Identify the correct multimedia element to enhance oral or written tasks when presented with options.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

The Star-Spangled Banner: This Flag is My Flag, This Flag is Our Flag:

This is lesson #1 in the text unit series for The Star-Spangled Banner. Students will learn that “The Star-Spangled Banner” is a name sometimes used to describe the American flag. They will identify the flag and will then use the front cover of the book to help them describe the U.S. flag and engage in a picture walk through the text looking for the flag in each illustration. They will learn what the colors and symbols on the flag mean and why they are used to represent the United States of America. Students will work individually to create a picture/symbol that represents them as an individual and then work in small groups to combine their symbols to create a group flag. These will be presented to the class along with a description of how their group worked together to create the finished product. Flags can be displayed over the group tables throughout the exploration of the unit.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Flag We Love - The Flag is an Important Symbol of the United States:

This is lesson # 4 in the text unit series for The Flag We Love. This lesson will use pages (1-2, 28-29) of the text to focus on students' oral retelling using the topic and details about the American Flag. Students will learn the concept of a symbol and recognize the American flag as a symbol of the United States, learning that the stars represent the 50 states, and the stripes represent the 13 original colonies. To demonstrate learning, students will create their own representation of the American flag, and orally present their flag while discussing the meaning of the stars and stripes.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

People at My School Part 3:

Students will complete a journal entry describing the role of one school authority figure at school as someone who helps others and makes rules to keep students safe. Using notes from previous interviews to guide their writing, students will recall at least one piece of information about the school authority figure’s responsibilities at school to make rules. In this lesson, students will draw their entries and include written or dictated information about the school authority figure. 

Type: Lesson Plan

People at My School Part 1:

Students will interview their teacher as a school authority figure. In this lesson, students will practice asking relevant questions focused on their teacher’s responsibilities as a school authority figure. Students will then draw a picture and add a label, writing or dictation of information about their teacher’s responsibilities at school.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

People at My School Part 2:

Students will interview several school authority figures. In this lesson, students will ask relevant questions focused on the individual’s responsibilities as a school authority figure. Students will then draw a picture and add a label, writing or dictation of information about the individual’s responsibilities at school. 

 

Type: Lesson Plan

My Strengths:

Students will create a poster that includes a drawing of themselves performing an identified strength. Students and the teacher will discuss and list the many different strengths that children have and things that they can do all by themselves. Students will then focus on one strength that they would like to write and draw about. In this lesson, students will create a self-portrait and add writing or writing attempts to complete a given sentence frame.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

Name That Word:

In these lessons, students will learn how to identify nouns and verbs using the story Nouns and Verbs Have a Field Day by Robin Pulver and participate in several structured and independent activities.

Type: Lesson Plan

I Don't Want to Take a Bath: Story Elements with Harry the Dirty Dog:

In this lesson, students will read the beloved children’s book, Harry the Dirty Dog. They will use this book to explore the elements of a story including a focus on the main character. Students will create a “Lost Dog” poster for Harry that includes his description, picture, and what to do if he is found.

Type: Lesson Plan

Speechless for Breakfast:

In this lesson, students will work together to "read" Pancakes for Breakfast, a wordless picture book by Tomie dePaola which shows the sequence of events the main character follows in preparing her own breakfast. Students will identify the story elements in the book based on its illustrations and retell the story by sequencing the important events. They will then create their own wordless picture book depicting their breakfast routine, presenting their routine and illustrations orally using complete sentences.

Type: Lesson Plan

Bear Necessities - Lesson 3 of 3:

Students will review and share what they have learned about brown bears and polar bears by comparing and contrasting these animals with a Venn Diagram and creating a bear project accompanied by a favorite fact.

Type: Lesson Plan

Colorful Rhymes:

The students will participate in reading the rhyming story The Crayon Box That Talked and help to generate words that rhyme with colors. Then, students will be able to demonstrate their understanding of rhyming words by completing a sorting activity.

Type: Lesson Plan

What's Going On? Predicting Topics and Details:

Students will use the book, On a Farm by Alexa Andrews to practice identifying the topic and details of a text. Through the use of a bubble map and a student response sheet, students will record their learning after exploring the book. Student work will be appreciated at the end of the lesson with a gallery walk.

Type: Lesson Plan

Comparing and Contrasting with Frog and Toad:

In this lesson, students will compare and contrast the experiences of the familiar characters, Frog and Toad, by completing t-charts and composing a response about the similarities and differences in the characters' experiences.

Type: Lesson Plan

Where Are the Words?: Exploring the Power of Illustrations:

As part of learning about Concepts of Print, students will explore how some books do not have words and you need to "read" the pictures to understand what is happening. The book, Chalk by Bill Thomson will be used to inspire the students to add writing to his book as they dream what they would draw if they knew their chalk drawings would come to life.

Type: Lesson Plan

Who Says Please and Thank You?:

In this lesson, students will recall information from a read aloud text and discuss what it means to demonstrate good manners. Activities include contributing to a good manners chart, composing a sentence using a sentence frame demonstrating understanding of the conventions of standard English and practicing spelling words in creative ways. At the end of the lesson, students will create a Good Manners page for a class book, sharing a time when they have shown good manners.

Type: Lesson Plan

An Unlikey Friend or Foe:

In this lesson, students will listen to The Grouchy Ladybug by Eric Carle and The Story of Ferdinand by Munro Leaf and will analyze the main character's actions and reactions to their adventures by comparing and contrasting using a Venn diagram. Students will also be given an opportunity to think and write about times that they have been grumpy or peaceful using grade-appropriate conventions of writing and phonetic spelling.

Type: Lesson Plan

ABC Text-plorers:

In this lesson, students will go on an exploration of alphabet books to better understand the roles of authors and illustrators as well as print concepts, including uppercase and lowercase letters. After reading the books Alphabet Rescue, Miss Spider's ABC, The Mixed-Up Alphabet, and LMNO Peas, students will contribute to class discussions and create a class alphabet book. After reading Chicka Chicka Boom Boom, students will complete an uppercase and lowercase letter sort art project that will be used as a summative assessment while the teacher individually tests students on their understanding of print concepts and letter recognition.

Type: Lesson Plan

Polar Bear Polar Bear:

In this lesson, students will practice identifying the topic and details in a nonfiction text about polar bears. They will work at completing a K-W-L chart with the teacher to help organize their thinking and think of questions that they have about this amazing animal. Students will also complete an independent assignment where they draw a picture of the topic and two details that they learned demonstrating what they have learned.

Type: Lesson Plan

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Parent Resources

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