ELA.K.C.1.4

Using a combination of drawing, dictating, and/or writing, provide factual information about a topic.

Clarifications

Clarification 1: The product can be written, drawn, dictated, or a combination of all. 
Clarification 2: Some opinion can be added to the information, but it should mostly be factual. It is important that students understand the difference between writing to explain and writing to express an opinion. 
Clarification 3: See Writing Types.
General Information
Subject Area: English Language Arts (B.E.S.T.)
Grade: K
Strand: Communication
Date Adopted or Revised: 08/20
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5010030: Functional Basic Skills in Communications-Elementary (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5010041: Language Arts - Kindergarten (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021, 2021 and beyond (current))
7710011: Access Language Arts - Kindergarten (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5011000: Library Skills/Information Literacy Kindergarten (Specifically in versions: 2016 - 2022, 2022 - 2023, 2023 and beyond (current))
5010100: Introduction to Debate Kindergarten (Specifically in versions: 2020 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5010011: English for Speakers of Other Languages Kindergarten (Specifically in versions: 2021 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
ELA.K.C.1.AP.4: Using a combination of drawing, dictating, selecting and/or writing, provide a fact about a topic.

Related Resources

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Lesson Plans

The Flag We Love - Make a Personal Flag:

This is lesson #6 in the text unit series for The Flag We Love. This lesson is a culminating activity that focuses on students’ recall of information from the text to answer the question: ”Why is the flag an important symbol of the United States?”. To demonstrate learning, students will use their knowledge of a symbol to create a personal flag and write a statement indicating why it is a meaningful symbol of themselves.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Flag We Love - Read Aloud with focus on vocabulary:

This is lesson # 3 in the text unit series for The Flag We Love. This lesson will be the first read through of the text after a picture walk has been done. After a whole group reading of the text, instruction will focus on text vocabulary. Students will identify one word that answers the question “Why is the American Flag important?” and create a drawing to demonstrate understanding.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Flag We Love: The American Flag in Detail:

This is lesson #5 in the text unit series for The Flag We Love. Students will participate in whole group and partner discussions about the places and times the American flag can be seen and is used as a symbol, as detailed in the picture book The Flag We Love by Pam Munoz Ryan. The teacher will elicit responses from the class to complete a topic/detail graphic organizer. Students will identify the topic of the text and several details, then illustrate one of the details and complete a sentence stem.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

People at My School Part 1:

Students will interview their teacher as a school authority figure. In this lesson, students will practice asking relevant questions focused on their teacher’s responsibilities as a school authority figure. Students will then draw a picture and add a label, writing or dictation of information about their teacher’s responsibilities at school.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

People at My School Part 2:

Students will interview several school authority figures. In this lesson, students will ask relevant questions focused on the individual’s responsibilities as a school authority figure. Students will then draw a picture and add a label, writing or dictation of information about the individual’s responsibilities at school. 

 

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Monkey Business: A Problem:

In this close reading lesson, the teacher will read aloud Caps for Sale by Esphyr Slobodkina. Students will answer text-dependent questions and explain the meaning of new vocabulary. They will identify sight words and choral read repetitive parts of the text. Students will identify the setting, characters, and important events (including the problem and solution) and record these on a story map. They will retell the story and create a tri-fold book with illustrations and sentences explaining the beginning, middle, and end of the story. After analyzing the text, students will draw and dictate or write to explain the problem and solution in the text.

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The Kissing Hand and A Pocket Full of Kisses: Compare and Contrast:

In this close reading lesson, students will compare and contrast the actions of the characters in two of Audrey Penn's beloved books, The Kissing Hand and A Pocket Full of Kisses. They will answer text-dependent questions, and they will describe and sequence story elements as they analyze the two books. Students will truly enjoy interacting with these two delightful stories!

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Five Little Monkeys: Comparing and Contrasting:

In this close reading lesson, students will compare and contrast the actions of the characters in two of Eileen Christelow's beloved books, Five Little Monkeys Jumping on the Bed and Five Little Monkeys Sitting in a Tree. They will answer text-dependent questions and describe story elements as they analyze the two books. Students will truly enjoy interacting with these two delightful stories!

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If You Give a Mouse a Cookie and Take Him to School: Comparing and Contrasting:

In this close reading lesson, students will compare and contrast the actions of the characters in two of Laura Numeroff's beloved books, If You Give a Mouse a Cookie and If You Take a Mouse to School. They will answer text-dependent questions, and they will describe and sequence story elements as they analyze the two books. Students will truly enjoy interacting with these two delightful stories!

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Colors All Around Us: Using Colors to Describe Our World:

In this lesson, students will use the beautiful text Green by Laura Vaccaro Seeger to explore how an author uses color words and illustrations to describe various real-world objects. They will identify and explain how the descriptive words provide meaning and how the illustrations support the text. Students will brainstorm real-life objects that can be described and classified using color words and write an expository piece to describe those objects.

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The Difference Between Fact and Opinion:

Using the book Diary of a Worm by Doreen Cronin, students will explain facts and opinions about worms from the text. Students will decide if information from the text is a fact or opinion and write a factual statement about worms from the text.

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Bear Necessities - Lesson 3 of 3:

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Bear Necessities - Lesson 1 of 3:

In this lesson, students will learn about the topic of brown bears by asking questions and gaining information from a non-fiction, informational text. Students will listen for key details in the text and recall information that will be demonstrated through drawing and writing.

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What's Going On? Predicting Topics and Details:

Students will use the book, On a Farm by Alexa Andrews to practice identifying the topic and details of a text. Through the use of a bubble map and a student response sheet, students will record their learning after exploring the book. Student work will be appreciated at the end of the lesson with a gallery walk.

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It's All in the Details:

In this multi-day lesson, students will learn about American holidays as they analyze grade-appropriate informational text. Students will learn to identify the front cover, back cover, and title page of a book and their text features. They will also learn how to use the text features (title, headings, and illustrations) to predict the topic of the book. As the teacher reads the book, students will confirm the topic and identify important details, recording them on a graphic organizer. Finally, students will use details from the graphic organizer to draw, dictate, and/or write an expository piece about the topic of the text. 

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What's the Big Idea?:

In this multi-day lesson, students will learn about American symbols as they analyze grade-appropriate informational text. Students will learn to identify the front cover, back cover, and title page of a book and their text features. They will also learn how to use the text features (title, headings, and illustrations) to predict the topic of the book. As the teacher reads the book, students will confirm the topic and identify important details, recording them on a graphic organizer. Finally, students will use details from the graphic organizer to draw, dictate, and/or write an expository piece about the topic of the text.

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Student Resources

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