ELA.K.C.1.1

Print many upper- and lowercase letters.

Clarifications

Clarification 1: Students should attend to spacing between letters. 

Clarification 2: Of the many letters students need to be able to print, all vowels must be included. For example, a student who can print 22 letters, both upper- and lowercase, but not “a” or “A” has not mastered the benchmark.

General Information
Subject Area: English Language Arts (B.E.S.T.)
Grade: K
Strand: Communication
Date Adopted or Revised: 08/20
Status: State Board Approved

Related Courses

This benchmark is part of these courses.
5010030: Functional Basic Skills in Communications-Elementary (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5010041: Language Arts - Kindergarten (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021, 2021 and beyond (current))
7710011: Access Language Arts - Kindergarten (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5010100: Introduction to Debate Kindergarten (Specifically in versions: 2020 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
5010011: English for Speakers of Other Languages Kindergarten (Specifically in versions: 2021 and beyond (current))

Related Access Points

Alternate version of this benchmark for students with significant cognitive disabilities.
ELA.K.C.1.AP.1: Print many upper- and lowercase letters with a model.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this benchmark.

Lesson Plans

People at My School Part 1:

Students will interview their teacher as a school authority figure. In this lesson, students will practice asking relevant questions focused on their teacher’s responsibilities as a school authority figure. Students will then draw a picture and add a label, writing or dictation of information about their teacher’s responsibilities at school.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

People at My School Part 2:

Students will interview several school authority figures. In this lesson, students will ask relevant questions focused on the individual’s responsibilities as a school authority figure. Students will then draw a picture and add a label, writing or dictation of information about the individual’s responsibilities at school. 

 

Type: Lesson Plan

Authority Figures within the Community:

In this lesson plan, students will identify community authority figures that make and enforce rules and laws.

Type: Lesson Plan

My Strengths:

Students will create a poster that includes a drawing of themselves performing an identified strength. Students and the teacher will discuss and list the many different strengths that children have and things that they can do all by themselves. Students will then focus on one strength that they would like to write and draw about. In this lesson, students will create a self-portrait and add writing or writing attempts to complete a given sentence frame.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

Name That Word:

In these lessons, students will learn how to identify nouns and verbs using the story Nouns and Verbs Have a Field Day by Robin Pulver and participate in several structured and independent activities.

Type: Lesson Plan

Supermarket Sorting:

In this lesson, in a hands-on activity, students will practice sorting food items from the grocery store into different categories. The teacher will read aloud Eating the Alphabet by Lois Ehlert and send students on a scavenger hunt to find and record pictures of fruits and vegetables that are hung around the room. Students will be asked to provide an opinion of what they think is the best fruit or vegetable during a writing assignment and explain why they like it. Then each student will draw a picture of that food on a paper plate to display with their writing.

Type: Lesson Plan

Who Says Please and Thank You?:

In this lesson, students will recall information from a read aloud text and discuss what it means to demonstrate good manners. Activities include contributing to a good manners chart, composing a sentence using a sentence frame demonstrating understanding of the conventions of standard English and practicing spelling words in creative ways. At the end of the lesson, students will create a Good Manners page for a class book, sharing a time when they have shown good manners.

Type: Lesson Plan

My Caterpillar Loves to Eat!:

In this lesson, students will listen to the teacher read aloud the well-loved book, The Very Hungry Caterpillar by Eric Carle. Students will collaboratively practice retelling the story with a partner and record the food that the caterpillar ate on a class chart. Using their imagination, students will create a sentence and accompanying illustration of what their caterpillar would eat using the high frequency word ‘and’. Teachers are provided with a rubric to assess how the students are using punctuationusing punctuation, capitalization, finger spacing, and phonetic spelling.

Type: Lesson Plan

Let's Get Moving!:

Students will move like their favorite animal and identify what the movement is called reviewing verbs. Then they will create a chart about ways that animals move and interact with a read aloud as they search for more movement ideas. Students will end the lesson by completing an opinion sentence about their favorite animal movement and why it is their favorite.

Type: Lesson Plan

Student Resources

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Parent Resources

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