Standard #: LAFS.910.RI.4.10 (Archived Standard)


This document was generated on CPALMS - www.cpalms.org



By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literary nonfiction in the grades 9–10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend literary nonfiction at the high end of the grades 9–10 text complexity band independently and proficiently.



Related Courses

Course Number1111 Course Title222
1000400: Intensive Language Arts (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (course terminated))
1000410: Intensive Reading (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021 (course terminated))
1001320: English Honors 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1001350: English Honors 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1001800: Florida's Preinternational Baccalaureate English 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1001810: Florida's Preinternational Baccalaureate English 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1002300: English 1 Through ESOL (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1002310: English 2 Through ESOL (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1002380: English Language Development (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1005350: Literature and the Arts 1 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1006300: Journalism 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2021, 2021 and beyond (current))
1006310: Journalism 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2021, 2021 and beyond (current))
1006331: Journalism 5 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1008300: Reading 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021 (course terminated))
1008310: Reading 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021 (course terminated))
1008320: Reading Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021 (course terminated))
1001310: English 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1001340: English 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
7910111: Access English 1/2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018 (course terminated))
1001315: English 1 for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1001345: English 2 for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1002305: English 1 Through ESOL for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2020 (course terminated))
1002315: English 2 Through ESOL for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2020 (course terminated))
1006375: Social Media 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021, 2021 and beyond (current))
2104350: Engaged Citizenship through Service-Learning 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
2104360: Engaged Citizenship through Service-Learning 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
1002381: Developmental Language Arts Through ESOL (Reading) (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
7910115: Fundamental English 1 (Specifically in versions: 2013 - 2015, 2015 - 2017 (course terminated))
7910120: Access English 1 (Specifically in versions: 2013 - 2015, 2015 - 2017, 2017 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
7910125: Access English 2 (Specifically in versions: 2013 - 2015, 2015 - 2017, 2017 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
1006305: Fundamentals of Journalism (Specifically in versions: 2021 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))


Related Resources

Lesson Plans

Name Description
Buried in Ash: New Revelations of an Ancient Culture

In this lesson, students read a non-fiction text as they learn of the artifacts unearthed from the remains of a Salvadoran village preserved in volcanic ash much like Pompeii. Students will discover how researchers piece together evidence to determine the significance the artifacts reveal in illustrating the daily lives of this ancient people. As students come to understand the researchers use the artifacts to infer religious, cultural and economic aspects of the Ceren village, they will answer text-dependent questions and compose a multi-paragraph writing response (sample answer keys included) asking students to describe the power of this natural disaster to destroy this ancient culture yet preserve its details for future generations to learn from.

CIS: Genetically Engineered Food Labeling Taken on by Congress in Right-To-Know Act

This CIS lesson is a deep reading lesson intended for 10th grade students. The lesson's essential question asks students: what evidence supports whether or not it should be a legal requirement for food labels to identify products that have been genetically modified? Students return to a news article looking for information three times. Students present their understanding through citing text-based evidence in a short writing assignment that is revisited and shaped throughout the lesson.

CIS: Life Beyond Earth

This CIS lesson is a deep reading lesson intended to be completed with 10th grade students. The article asks students to examine the possibility of extraterrestrial life forms. Students return to the article looking for information three times. Students present their understanding using text-based evidence in a short writing assignment that is revisited and shaped throughout the lesson.

CIS: Ban on Bottled Water, Apparently a First, Puts a Small Town on a Big Stage

This CIS lesson is a deep reading lesson intended to be completed with 9th grade students. The article presents information regarding a town's ban on bottled water and asks students to determine whether bottled water is a wise consumer choice. Students return to the article looking for information three times. Students present their understanding through use of text-based evidence in a short writing assignment that is revisited and shaped throughout the lesson.

CIS: How Environment and Technology Can Improve Health Care

This CIS lesson is a deep reading lesson intended for 10th grade students. Students are asked to examine how technology and environment impact patient recovery in the health care system. Students return to a news article looking for information three times. Students present their understanding using text-based evidence in a short writing assignment that is revisited and shaped throughout the lesson.

CIS: Tensions Swelling as Beach Erodes

This CIS lesson is a deep reading lesson intended for 9th grade students. Students are asked & to determine what causes beach erosion and explore how communities are impacted by erosion. Students return to a news article looking for information three times. Students present their understanding through use of text-based evidence in a short writing assignment that is revisited and shaped throughout the lesson.

Someone is Always Watching You

In this lesson, students will read, paraphrase, and summarize an article that explores the benefits as well as the pitfalls of the unblinking, all-seeing basilisk gaze of extraordinary technology.

CIS: To Make School Food Healthy, Michelle Obama Has a Tall Order

This CIS lesson is a deep reading lesson intended to be completed with 9th grade students. The article presents a journalist's experience with his daughter's school lunch program and asks students to decide whether schools are making sufficient progress towards providing healthy meals. Students return to the article looking for information three times. Students present their claim and text-based evidence in a short writing assignment that is re-visited and shaped throughout the lesson.

CIS: Psychopathic Criminals and Brain Research

This CIS lesson is a deep reading lesson intended to be completed with 10th grade students. The article presents research on psychopathy and asks students to determine, based on the evidence, whether psychopaths are truly responsible for their criminal acts. Students return to the article looking for information three times. Students present their claim and text-based evidence in a short writing assignment that is re-visited and shaped throughout the lesson.

The Surveillance Society – Is Privacy just an Illusion?

"The line between private and public space is as porous as tissue paper." Students will explore issues of privacy through the TIME magazine article "The Surveillance Society" by David Von Drehle. This article will provide students with an opportunity to be up close and personal with delineating, evaluating, and explaining an author's claim. Students will read chunks of text while interacting with a graphic organizer to assist them in drawing conclusions and creating an original response to whether or not privacy has become an illusion due to our technological advances.

One rotten apple spoils the bunch! An Argument Analysis of Disney's Guest Assistance Card Program

In this lesson, students will conduct several close readings of the news article "Parents: Disney Policy Targeting Faux Disabled Punishes Truly Disabled Kids" by Jason Garcia. For the first close reading, students will focus on selected academic vocabulary. In the second reading, students will analyze the claims being made in the article, focusing on the validity of each claim being made. During the final close reading, students will analyze the arguments being presented, choose a side, and participate in a Philosophical Chair discussion. In the summative assessment, students will write a three paragraph argument in the form of a letter to the Disney corporation.

Privacy: A Matter of National Security?

In this lesson, students will embark upon a journey of espionage and inquire how the rights of one can become a barrier for the greater good of a nation.

Students will read two informational texts about former NSA agent Edward Snowden. This close reading activity will require students to use textual support, reasoning and relevancy of the text, and analyze an author's claims to engage in discourse through Philosophical Chairs. Students will also synthesize the arguments, information, and claims within the text to write an essay proving that Snowden is either a hero or a traitor.

A Biography Study: Using Role-Play to Explore the Lives of Authors

Dramatizing life stories provides students with an engaging way to become more critical readers and researchers. In this lesson, students select American authors to research, create timelines, and write bio-poems. Then, they collaborate with other students in small groups to design and perform a 'panel of authors' presentation in which they role-play as their authors. The final project requires each student to synthesize information about his or her author in an essay. There are tons of additional links and resources included in this lesson plan!

Analyzing Logos, Ethos, Pathos in "The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro"

This lesson supports the implementation of the academic standards in the 9-10 classroom. It includes a copy of the text, a student activity handout, and links for background information and definitions of key terms. The purpose of this lesson is for students to read, understand, and analyze a speech through close reading and scaffolded learning tasks. At the conclusion of the lesson, students will write an essay that prompts them to use textual evidence to support their analysis of the claim Douglass makes in his speech "The Meaning of July Fourth for the Negro."

Exploring Immigration and America (Part 2) through Informational Text- Judge Learned Hand's Speech

This lesson is the second of a unit comprised of 3 lessons. In this second lesson, students will use Text Coding and small group discussion to analyze informational text, a speech given by Judge Learned Hand entitled "The Spirit of Liberty," in terms of content and persuasive techniques. This lesson will help students to read informational text closely, think critically and write in response to text.

Essential Liberty v. Temporary Safety

In this lesson, students will explore the concepts of individual rights and freedoms as opposed to the good of society using currently relevant topics. Students will participate in small-group and teacher-led discussions, research, collaboration, and debate to gain understanding and to present their findings and conclusions, supported by evidence, about the issues and implications of their assigned topics. Supporting materials will enable the teacher to guide students to consider, explore, and respond to the guiding question of whether it"s appropriate in a democratic society to give up essential liberties for temporary safety.

Original Student Tutorials

Name Description
Our Mothers’ Gardens: An Account in Two Mediums

Learn about author Alice Walker and the influence and legacy of her mother, Minnie Lou Tallulah Grant. In this interactive English Language Arts tutorial, you’ll read excerpts from “In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens,” an essay written by Alice Walker. You’ll also watch a video titled “A Black Writer in the South,” which highlights important aspects of Alice Walker’s childhood. You'll also analyze various accounts of a subject, in this case, the influence and legacy of Alice Walker’s mother, as told through two different mediums: text and video.

Rhetoric and Point of View in "The Solitude of Self"

Examine excerpts from a powerful speech on women, equality, and individuality in this interactive English Language Arts tutorial. You'll study excerpts from "The Solitude of Self” by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and examine how her choice of words, descriptions, and observations help reveal her point of view. You'll also analyze how rhetoric, specifically the use of logos and pathos, can help express an author's point of view.

Evaluating an Argument – Part Four: JFK’s Inaugural Address

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence.

In Part Four, you'll use what you've learned throughout this series to evaluate Kennedy's overall argument.

Make sure to complete the previous parts of this series before beginning Part 4.

  • Click HERE to launch Part One.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Two.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Three.
Evaluating an Argument – Part Three: JFK’s Inaugural Address

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence. By the end of this four-part series, you should be able to evaluate his overall argument. 

In Part Three, you will read more of Kennedy's speech and identify a smaller claim in this section of his speech. You will also evaluate this smaller claim's relevancy to the main claim and evaluate Kennedy's reasons and evidence. 

Make sure to complete all four parts of this series!

  • Click HERE to launch Part One.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Two.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Four.
Evaluating an Argument – Part Two: JFK’s Inaugural Address

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence. By the end of this four-part series, you should be able to evaluate his overall argument. 

In Part Two, you will read more of Kennedy's speech, identify the smaller claims in this part of his speech, and examine his reasons and evidence.

Make sure to complete all four parts of this series!

Click HERE to launch Part One.

Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Click HERE to launch Part Four.

Evaluating an Argument – Part One: JFK’s Inaugural Address

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence. By the end of this four-part series, you should be able to evaluate his overall argument. 

In Part One, you will read the beginning of Kennedy's speech, examine his reasons and evidence in this section, and identify the main claim of his argument. 

Make sure to complete all four parts of this series! 

Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Click HERE to launch Part Four.

Ready for Takeoff! -- Part Two

This is Part Two of a two-part tutorial series. In this interactive tutorial, you'll practice identifying a speaker's purpose using a speech by aviation pioneer Amelia Earhart. You will examine her use of rhetorical appeals, including ethos, logos, pathos, and kairos. Finally, you'll evaluate the effectiveness of Earhart's use of rhetorical appeals.

Be sure to complete Part One first. Click here to launch PART ONE.

Ready for Takeoff! -- Part One

This is Part One of a two-part tutorial series. In this interactive tutorial, you'll practice identifying a speaker's purpose using a speech by aviation pioneer Amelia Earhart. You will examine her use of rhetorical appeals, including ethos, logos, pathos, and kairos. Finally, you'll evaluate the effectiveness of Earhart's use of rhetorical appeals. 

Click here to launch PART TWO.

Unraveling the Seams: How Authors Unfold Events - Part Two

Learn to identify the text structure and its purpose within a nonfiction text. In this two-part tutorial series, you'll read excerpts from Maya Angelou's autobiography I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. You'll examine how the text structure contributes to meaning in the text, and you'll analyze how the order of events and relationships between events add to the meaning as well.

Make sure to complete both parts. Click here to launch PART ONE.

Drones and Glaciers: Eyes in the Sky (Part 2 of 4)

Learn how to identify the central idea and important details of a text, as well as how to write an effective summary in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial is the second tutorial in a four-part series that examines how scientists are using drones to explore glaciers in Peru. 

This tutorial is part two of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Drones and Glaciers: Eyes in the Sky (Part 1 of 4)

Learn about how researchers are using drones, also called unmanned aerial vehicles or UAVs, to study glaciers in Peru. In this interactive tutorial, you will practice citing text evidence when answering questions about a text.

This tutorial is part one of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Unraveling the Seams: How Authors Unfold Events - Part One

Learn to identify the text structure and its purpose within a nonfiction text. In this two-part tutorial series, you'll read excerpts from Maya Angelou's autobiography I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. You'll examine how the text structure contributes to meaning in the text, and you'll analyze how the order of events and relationships between events add to the meaning as well.

Make sure to complete both parts. Click here to launch PART TWO

Analyzing Words and Phrases with the Gettysburg Address

Read and examine Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address in this interactive tutorial. First, you'll practice using context clues to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words in the famous text. Next, you'll analyze Lincoln's specific word choice throughout the speech and examine how it conveys his tone or attitude.

The Cost of Indifference: Determining the Central Idea

Remember the Holocaust and consider the cost of indifference as you read selected excerpts from texts written by the late Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel. In this interactive tutorial, you'll look carefully at his words so that you may think critically and deeply about his central ideas. You'll also identify the important supporting details of a central idea and explain how the central idea is refined by specific details.

Analyzing Related Concepts in Historical U.S. Documents

In this tutorial, you'll practice identifying and analyzing how specific concepts are addressed in texts from two different time periods. The featured texts include the Bill of Rights and an excerpt from the "Four Freedoms" speech by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. You'll practice analyzing the similarities and differences in how the two texts address certain concepts.

Understanding and Using Context Clues with the Help of Patrick Henry

Learn how to identify context clues in a nonfiction text to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words. In this interactive tutorial, you'll read excerpts from Patrick Henry's "Speech to the Virginia Convention." You'll learn strategies for applying context clues to make predictions about the meanings of unfamiliar words. Finally, you'll practice using dictionary entries to confirm your predictions of unfamiliar word meanings.

 

Get More of the Scoop: Analyzing Text and Video Accounts of a Subject

Learn how to analyze accounts of the same subject expressed in different mediums. In this interactive tutorial, you'll compare and contrast the details included in a short text with those included in a short video. We'll use President Lincoln's Gettysburg Address to examine how certain details are presented and emphasized differently in each medium. 

The Power of Words: Analyzing the Use of Rhetoric

Learn how to identify and analyze a speaker's use of rhetoric and rhetorical techniques. In this interactive tutorial, we'll examine the art of rhetoric as well as Aristotle's Rhetorical Triangle. We'll analyze the use of ethos, pathos, and logos in several historical speeches. We'll also analyze how speakers convey their point of view about a topic through the use of various rhetorical techniques, including repetition and rhetorical questions.

President Ronald Reagan Speaks to the "Enemy"

Learn to analyze evidence in an informational text using excerpts from a famous speech by President Ronald Reagan: "Address to Students at Moscow State University." In this interactive tutorial, you'll practice identifying what the text states both directly and indirectly. You'll also practice making inferences based on the specific textual evidence presented in the speech. Along the way, you'll learn some important background information on the Cold War between the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. 

Resource Collection

Name Description
Kelly Gallagher: Building Deeper Readers and Writers

This collection of articles covers a wide variety of topics that teens would find interesting. Each article includes thoughtful questions that require close reading and/or personal written response. Teachers can choose which articles to assign and how to grade student responses.

Teaching Idea

Name Description
To Kill A Mockingbird: A Historical Perspective

This is a 10 day overview from the Library of Congress on a Historical Perspective of the time period surrounding To Kill A Mockingbird. Includes a lot of primary resources and writing activities.

Text Resources

Name Description
Buried in Ash, Ancient Salvadoran Village Shows Images of Daily Life

This informational text is designed to support reading in the content area. It describes the remains of a Salvadoran village preserved in volcanic ash, much like Europe's Pompeii. The unearthed village reveals artifacts that illustrate the daily lives of this ancient people. The authors use artifacts to infer religious, cultural and economic aspects of the Ceren village.

Read Aloud with Audio Books

Lit2Go is a free online collection of stories and poems in Mp3 (audiobook) format. An abstract, citation, playing time, and word count are given for each of the passages. Many of the passages also have a related reading strategy identified. Each reading passage can also be downloaded as a PDF and printed for use as a read-along or as supplemental reading material for your classroom. The Flesch-Kincaid Readability formula is used to determine grade level appropriateness.

Buzz Aldrin on Why We Should Go to Mars

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the academic content areas. It is most appropriate for 9th-10th grade students enrolled in a U.S. History or an Earth/Space Science class.

This is an interview of Apollo astronaut Buzz Aldrin, one of the first men to walk on the moon. In a question/answer format, Aldrin answers questions about his ambitious vision for the future of American space exploration, and he also reflects on the past and present of the U.S. space program.

How the Ford Motor Company Won a Battle and Lost Ground

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the Social Studies content area. It is most appropriate for 9th-10th grade students enrolled in a U.S. History class.

This article relates the infamous incident of UAW leaders beaten savagely by Ford "security" forces in 1937. Although Ford spokesmen tried to blame union members for the violence, photos taken at the scene proved otherwise, leading to Ford's eventual capitulation to the UAW.

Who Stole Helen Keller?

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the Social Studies content area. It is most appropriate for 9th-10th grade students enrolled in a U.S. History class.

This essay is a reevaluation of the life and reputation of Helen Keller, especially as it is commonly (mis)represented in textbooks and biographies for young readers. The author argues that Keller should be remembered for far more than being courageous, as she was also a "defiant rebel" and a radical.

What Caused the Dust Bowl?

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the Social Studies content area. It is most appropriate for 9th-10th grade students enrolled in a U.S. History class.

The author explains the causes of, and the attempted solutions to, the 1930s-era environmental catastrophe known as the Dust Bowl.

A Senate Apology for History on Lynching

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the Social Studies content area. It is most appropriate for 9-0 grade students enrolled in a U.S. History class.

The author reports on the passage of a Senate resolution that apologizes for its failure to pass previous anti-lynching registration.

The Inventor of Mother's Day Disowned the Holiday, and So Should We All

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the academic content areas. It is most appropriate for 9th-10th grade students enrolled in an English or Social Studies class.


Researchers Turn Brains Transparent By Sucking Out the Fat This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the content area. This brief (659 word) illustrated article describes the accomplishment at Stanford University of a pair of researchers who rendered a mouse brain transparent by removing the fat molecules in the cell membranes.

Unit/Lesson Sequence

Name Description
Sample English 2 Curriculum Plan Using CMAP

This sample English II CMAP is a fully customizable resource and curriculum-planning tool that provides a framework for the English II course. This CMAP is divided into 14 English Language Arts units and includes every standard from Florida's official course description for English II. The units and standards are customizable, and the CMAP allows instructors to add lessons, class notes, homework sheets, and other resources as needed. This CMAP also includes a row that automatically filters and displays e-learning Original Student Tutorials that are aligned to the standards and available on CPALMS.

Learn more about the sample English II CMAP, its features, and its customizability by watching this video:

Using this CMAP

To view an introduction on the CMAP tool, please .

To view the CMAP, click on the "Open Resource Page" button above; be sure you are logged in to your iCPALMS account.

To use this CMAP, click on the "Clone" button once the CMAP opens in the "Open Resource Page." Once the CMAP is cloned, you will be able to see it as a class inside your iCPALMS My Planner (CMAPs) app.

To access your My Planner App and the cloned CMAP, click on the iCPALMS tab in the top menu.

All CMAP tutorials can be found within the iCPALMS Planner App or at the following URL: http://www.cpalms.org/support/tutorials_and_informational_videos.aspx

Student Resources

Original Student Tutorials

Name Description
Our Mothers’ Gardens: An Account in Two Mediums:

Learn about author Alice Walker and the influence and legacy of her mother, Minnie Lou Tallulah Grant. In this interactive English Language Arts tutorial, you’ll read excerpts from “In Search of Our Mothers’ Gardens,” an essay written by Alice Walker. You’ll also watch a video titled “A Black Writer in the South,” which highlights important aspects of Alice Walker’s childhood. You'll also analyze various accounts of a subject, in this case, the influence and legacy of Alice Walker’s mother, as told through two different mediums: text and video.

Rhetoric and Point of View in "The Solitude of Self":

Examine excerpts from a powerful speech on women, equality, and individuality in this interactive English Language Arts tutorial. You'll study excerpts from "The Solitude of Self” by Elizabeth Cady Stanton and examine how her choice of words, descriptions, and observations help reveal her point of view. You'll also analyze how rhetoric, specifically the use of logos and pathos, can help express an author's point of view.

Evaluating an Argument – Part Four: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence.

In Part Four, you'll use what you've learned throughout this series to evaluate Kennedy's overall argument.

Make sure to complete the previous parts of this series before beginning Part 4.

  • Click HERE to launch Part One.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Two.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Three.
Evaluating an Argument – Part Three: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence. By the end of this four-part series, you should be able to evaluate his overall argument. 

In Part Three, you will read more of Kennedy's speech and identify a smaller claim in this section of his speech. You will also evaluate this smaller claim's relevancy to the main claim and evaluate Kennedy's reasons and evidence. 

Make sure to complete all four parts of this series!

  • Click HERE to launch Part One.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Two.
  • Click HERE to launch Part Four.
Evaluating an Argument – Part Two: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence. By the end of this four-part series, you should be able to evaluate his overall argument. 

In Part Two, you will read more of Kennedy's speech, identify the smaller claims in this part of his speech, and examine his reasons and evidence.

Make sure to complete all four parts of this series!

Click HERE to launch Part One.

Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Click HERE to launch Part Four.

Evaluating an Argument – Part One: JFK’s Inaugural Address:

Examine President John F. Kennedy's inaugural address in this interactive tutorial. You will examine Kennedy's argument, main claim, smaller claims, reasons, and evidence. By the end of this four-part series, you should be able to evaluate his overall argument. 

In Part One, you will read the beginning of Kennedy's speech, examine his reasons and evidence in this section, and identify the main claim of his argument. 

Make sure to complete all four parts of this series! 

Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Click HERE to launch Part Three.

Click HERE to launch Part Four.

Ready for Takeoff! -- Part Two:

This is Part Two of a two-part tutorial series. In this interactive tutorial, you'll practice identifying a speaker's purpose using a speech by aviation pioneer Amelia Earhart. You will examine her use of rhetorical appeals, including ethos, logos, pathos, and kairos. Finally, you'll evaluate the effectiveness of Earhart's use of rhetorical appeals.

Be sure to complete Part One first. Click here to launch PART ONE.

Ready for Takeoff! -- Part One:

This is Part One of a two-part tutorial series. In this interactive tutorial, you'll practice identifying a speaker's purpose using a speech by aviation pioneer Amelia Earhart. You will examine her use of rhetorical appeals, including ethos, logos, pathos, and kairos. Finally, you'll evaluate the effectiveness of Earhart's use of rhetorical appeals. 

Click here to launch PART TWO.

Unraveling the Seams: How Authors Unfold Events - Part Two:

Learn to identify the text structure and its purpose within a nonfiction text. In this two-part tutorial series, you'll read excerpts from Maya Angelou's autobiography I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. You'll examine how the text structure contributes to meaning in the text, and you'll analyze how the order of events and relationships between events add to the meaning as well.

Make sure to complete both parts. Click here to launch PART ONE.

Drones and Glaciers: Eyes in the Sky (Part 2 of 4):

Learn how to identify the central idea and important details of a text, as well as how to write an effective summary in this interactive tutorial. This tutorial is the second tutorial in a four-part series that examines how scientists are using drones to explore glaciers in Peru. 

This tutorial is part two of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Drones and Glaciers: Eyes in the Sky (Part 1 of 4):

Learn about how researchers are using drones, also called unmanned aerial vehicles or UAVs, to study glaciers in Peru. In this interactive tutorial, you will practice citing text evidence when answering questions about a text.

This tutorial is part one of a four-part series. Click below to open the other tutorials in this series.

Unraveling the Seams: How Authors Unfold Events - Part One:

Learn to identify the text structure and its purpose within a nonfiction text. In this two-part tutorial series, you'll read excerpts from Maya Angelou's autobiography I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. You'll examine how the text structure contributes to meaning in the text, and you'll analyze how the order of events and relationships between events add to the meaning as well.

Make sure to complete both parts. Click here to launch PART TWO

Analyzing Words and Phrases with the Gettysburg Address:

Read and examine Abraham Lincoln's Gettysburg Address in this interactive tutorial. First, you'll practice using context clues to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words in the famous text. Next, you'll analyze Lincoln's specific word choice throughout the speech and examine how it conveys his tone or attitude.

The Cost of Indifference: Determining the Central Idea:

Remember the Holocaust and consider the cost of indifference as you read selected excerpts from texts written by the late Holocaust survivor Elie Wiesel. In this interactive tutorial, you'll look carefully at his words so that you may think critically and deeply about his central ideas. You'll also identify the important supporting details of a central idea and explain how the central idea is refined by specific details.

Analyzing Related Concepts in Historical U.S. Documents:

In this tutorial, you'll practice identifying and analyzing how specific concepts are addressed in texts from two different time periods. The featured texts include the Bill of Rights and an excerpt from the "Four Freedoms" speech by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. You'll practice analyzing the similarities and differences in how the two texts address certain concepts.

Understanding and Using Context Clues with the Help of Patrick Henry:

Learn how to identify context clues in a nonfiction text to determine the meaning of unfamiliar words. In this interactive tutorial, you'll read excerpts from Patrick Henry's "Speech to the Virginia Convention." You'll learn strategies for applying context clues to make predictions about the meanings of unfamiliar words. Finally, you'll practice using dictionary entries to confirm your predictions of unfamiliar word meanings.

 

Get More of the Scoop: Analyzing Text and Video Accounts of a Subject:

Learn how to analyze accounts of the same subject expressed in different mediums. In this interactive tutorial, you'll compare and contrast the details included in a short text with those included in a short video. We'll use President Lincoln's Gettysburg Address to examine how certain details are presented and emphasized differently in each medium. 

The Power of Words: Analyzing the Use of Rhetoric:

Learn how to identify and analyze a speaker's use of rhetoric and rhetorical techniques. In this interactive tutorial, we'll examine the art of rhetoric as well as Aristotle's Rhetorical Triangle. We'll analyze the use of ethos, pathos, and logos in several historical speeches. We'll also analyze how speakers convey their point of view about a topic through the use of various rhetorical techniques, including repetition and rhetorical questions.

President Ronald Reagan Speaks to the "Enemy":

Learn to analyze evidence in an informational text using excerpts from a famous speech by President Ronald Reagan: "Address to Students at Moscow State University." In this interactive tutorial, you'll practice identifying what the text states both directly and indirectly. You'll also practice making inferences based on the specific textual evidence presented in the speech. Along the way, you'll learn some important background information on the Cold War between the U.S. and the U.S.S.R. 



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