Standard #: LAFS.910.RL.4.10 (Archived Standard)


This document was generated on CPALMS - www.cpalms.org



By the end of grade 9, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, in the grades 9–10 text complexity band proficiently, with scaffolding as needed at the high end of the range.

By the end of grade 10, read and comprehend literature, including stories, dramas, and poems, at the high end of the grades 9-10 text complexity band independently and proficiently.



Related Courses

Course Number1111 Course Title222
1000400: Intensive Language Arts (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022 (course terminated))
1000410: Intensive Reading (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021 (course terminated))
1001320: English Honors 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1001350: English Honors 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1001800: Florida's Preinternational Baccalaureate English 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1001810: Florida's Preinternational Baccalaureate English 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1002300: English 1 Through ESOL (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1002310: English 2 Through ESOL (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1002380: English Language Development (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1005350: Literature and the Arts 1 Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2019, 2019 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1008300: Reading 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021 (course terminated))
1008310: Reading 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021 (course terminated))
1008320: Reading Honors (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021 (course terminated))
1001310: English 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1001340: English 2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
7910111: Access English 1/2 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2018 (course terminated))
1001315: English 1 for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1001345: English 2 for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
1002305: English 1 Through ESOL for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2020 (course terminated))
1002315: English 2 Through ESOL for Credit Recovery (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2020 (course terminated))
1006375: Social Media 1 (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2021, 2021 and beyond (current))
1002381: Developmental Language Arts Through ESOL (Reading) (Specifically in versions: 2014 - 2015, 2015 - 2022, 2022 and beyond (current))
7910115: Fundamental English 1 (Specifically in versions: 2013 - 2015, 2015 - 2017 (course terminated))
7910120: Access English 1 (Specifically in versions: 2013 - 2015, 2015 - 2017, 2017 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
7910125: Access English 2 (Specifically in versions: 2013 - 2015, 2015 - 2017, 2017 - 2018, 2018 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
1005345: Humane Letters 1 Literature (Specifically in versions: 2019 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
1005346: Humane Letters 1 Literature Honors (Specifically in versions: 2020 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
1005347: Humane Letters 2 Literature (Specifically in versions: 2020 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)
1005348: Humane Letters 2 Literature Honors (Specifically in versions: 2020 - 2022, 2022 - 2023 (current), 2023 and beyond)


Related Resources

Lesson Plans

Name Description
Comparing Irony: The Gift of the Magi--Lesson 3 of 3

This lesson is the third in a series of three based on O. Henry's short story "The Gift of the Magi." The previous lessons provide instruction in using context clues to determine word meanings and in analyzing the significance of literary devices in a short story. In this final lesson, students will apply their knowledge of context clues from lesson one while also working to analyze irony across two texts, "The Gift of the Magi" and "The Shivering Beggar," a poem by Robert Graves.

Analyzing Elements of Fiction: The Gift of the Magi--Lesson 2 of 3

In this lesson, students will analyze the contribution of point of view, setting, allusion, plot, and irony to the development of theme in O. Henry's classic short story, "The Gift of the Magi." Students will write an extended paragraph explaining how one device contributes to the theme. This lesson is the second in a series of three based on "The Gift of the Magi." The previous lesson provides instruction in using context clues to determine word meaning.

You've Just Won "The Lottery"!

In this lesson, students will analyze Shirley Jackson's short story "The Lottery." Students will first view the thrilling movie trailer to hook them into the lesson. Students will then read the short story, work to determine the meaning of selected vocabulary words from the text, and answer guided reading questions. In the summative assessment, students will become newspaper reporters and write an article to describe the events of the lottery, as if they were present on the day the lottery took place. This lesson will take students to a different time period - when winning the lottery felt more like losing! Included with the lesson are guiding questions and an answer key, as well as a writing checklist and rubric.

Poetry Perspectives: A Close Reading Lesson

In this lesson, students will read the poem "The War After the War" by Debora Greger and examine the three different speaker perspectives within the poem. This lesson provides an opportunity for students to examine and analyze figurative language and perspective, as well as craft their own poem using multiple perspectives and figurative language. Graphic organizers, answer keys, and a poem writing rubric have been included with the lesson. 

Exploring Irony with the Conclusion of All Quiet on the Western Front

The focus of this lesson is to have students rewrite the ending of All Quiet on the Western Front. The newly created ending must include some form of irony in order to stay with the ironic elements of the book. Students will then peer edit each other's ending, and then revise their final draft. Finally, students will create a new cover for the book in which they will reveal their new title to the text.

Happily Ever After? Exploring Character, Conflict, and Plot in Dramatic Tragedy

How would the story have changed if Romeo had received the letter? This lesson encourages students to pick a turning point in a tragedy and show how the action of the play would have been significantly altered had a different decision been made or a different action taken. Students use a graphic organizer to analyze the plot of the play. They identify a turning point in the play, alter the decision that the characters make, and predict the characters' actions throughout the rest of the play. Students create a plot outline of their altered play and present their new stories to the class. Teachers can test students' content knowledge and understanding of conflicts within the play while also challenging their creativity and their understanding of plot. This lesson focuses on Shakespearean tragedy, but it can be used with any tragedy that students have read or as a book report alternative.

Creating Suspense Lesson 2: Analyzing Literary Devices in "The Lottery"

In this lesson (part 2 of 2 in a unit), students will read and analyze literary devices in Shirley Jackson's "The Lottery." Students will practice text-coding the story to note uses of characterization and references to tradition. Students will complete a handout where they will analyze how Jackson creates suspense through the use of setting, imagery, diction, and foreshadowing. Students will also compare/contrast a short (ten minute) film version of "The Lottery" to Jackson's story. Students will also participate in a Socratic Seminar covering topics such as Jackson's use of irony, tone, theme, and symbolism. For the summative assessment, students will write an essay comparing and contrasting Edgar Allan Poe's use of suspense with Jackson's, making a claim as to which author more successfully creates a suspenseful mood.

 

“Greek Mythology Version 2.0: To Be or Not to Be an Epic Hero?”

In this second lesson out of a three lesson unit, students will be able to continue analyzing the different characteristics that make a Greek Hero as they read books 1-10 of The Odyssey. On a more macro level, students will be able to analyze characteristics by looking at the ways in which characters are developed through the decisions they make and/or fail to make. The student handouts with all of the activities and links to the story are provided.

Creating Suspense Lesson 1: Analyzing Literary Devices in Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death"

In this lesson, students will read and analyze literary devices used in Edgar Allan Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death." They will read the first part of the story with support and modeling from the teacher, the next part in small groups, and the final section on their own. Students will examine Poe's use of imagery, foreshadowing, simile, personification, symbolism, and characterization. Students will also use various strategies to determine the meaning of selected vocabulary within the context of the story, as well as work to identify word choices that evoke a sense of time and place for the setting of the story. In the summative assessment, students will be able to explain how Poe creates suspense in his story, and they will be able to determine a theme from the story with support from the text. 

Greek Mythology: The Odyssey, Odysseus and What Makes an Epic Hero

In this lesson, students will explore books 13-23 of The Odyssey through text coding and analysis of both character development and theme. For the summative assessment, students will write an essay analyzing characterization and theme in the text and drawing conclusions, supported by textual evidence, about the nature of heroes. Student handouts for all activities are provided.

It’s Ironic…or is it?

The purpose of this lesson is to introduce to students the various types of irony. When examining an excerpt from "The Cask of Amontillado", students will be expected to identify and analyze how and why an author would chose to incorporate irony into their writing.

Death: The Good, the Bad, and the Ugly (Lesson Three of Three, Poems about Death)

In this lesson, students will compare and contrast the tone and theme of two poems about death. Students will annotate text, complete a directed note taking organizer and essay organizer, and will write a compare/contrast essay.

Emily Dickinson: Poet Extraordinaire of Language, Time, and Space Part 3

In this lesson, students will work in small groups to analyze the multiple perspectives represented in Emily Dickinson's writing. They will generate research and investigate primary and secondary documents on movements that influenced Dickinson. Through this research they will create a reference kit - a collection of materials that are representative of the period. They will then analyze similar poetry from other like-minded writers before moving on to Emily Dickinson, using the movements they researched as "lenses" through which to view the poems. The culminating activity includes a thorough analysis of Dickinson's poem "I Dwell in Possibility" and a resulting essay.

Poetry Reading and Interpretation Through Extensive Modeling

Through the use of extensive modeling with John Berryman's "Sole Watchman," students will understand the steps involved in the analysis and interpretation in poetry. The teacher will model how to summarize and analyze the poem, construct a thesis, and develop an essay. Students will review and discuss a sample essay complete with comments that highlight strong writing decisions. After reading and interpreting Berryman's "The Ball Poem," students will construct a 3-4 page essay on this poem.

Original Student Tutorials

Name Description
From Myth to Short Story: Drawing on Source Material – Part Two

Examine the topics of transformation and perfection as you read excerpts from the “Myth of Pygmalion” by Ovid and the short story “The Birthmark” by Nathaniel Hawthorne. By the end of this two-part interactive tutorial series, you should be able to explain how the short story draws on and transforms source material from the original myth. 

This tutorial is the second in a two-part series. Click HERE to launch Part One.

From Myth to Short Story: Drawing on Source Material – Part One

Examine the topics of transformation and perfection as you read excerpts from the “Myth of Pygmalion” by Ovid and the short story “The Birthmark” by Nathaniel Hawthorne. By the end of this two-part interactive tutorial series, you should be able to explain how the short story draws on and transforms source material from the original myth.  

This tutorial is the first in a two-part series. Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Light and Darkness in Two Artistic Mediums

Study the poem “We Grow Accustomed to the Dark” by Emily Dickinson and view the painting The Starry Night by Vincent van Gogh to explain how each medium represents the subjects of light and darkness similarly and differently, as you complete this interactive tutorial.

Culture and Point of View in "The Overcoat" – Part Two

Explore and explain multiple points of view in the story "The Overcoat" by Nikolai Gogol, which is set in 19th century St. Petersburg, Russia. In this interactive tutorial, you'll also observe the culture of this society from multiple angles. 

This is the second tutorial in a two-part series. Before completing this tutorial, click here to launch Part One.

Culture and Point of View in "The Overcoat" – Part One

Learn multiple points of view in the story "The Overcoat" by Nikolai Gogol. In this two-part interactive tutorial, you’ll study excerpts from this story set in 19th century St. Petersburg, Russia. By the end of this tutorial series, you should be able to explain how the multiple points of view within the story allows readers to observe the culture of this society from multiple angles.

Make sure to complete both parts of this series! Click here to launch Part Two

Analyzing Word Choices in Poe's "The Raven" -- Part Two

Practice analyzing word choices in "The Raven" by Edgar Allan Poe, including word meanings, subtle differences between words with similar meanings, and emotions connected to specific words. In this interactive tutorial, you will also analyze the impact of specific word choices on the meaning of the poem.

This is Part Two of a two-part series. Part One should be completed before beginning Part Two. Click HERE to open Part One.

Analyzing Word Choices in Poe's "The Raven" -- Part One

Practice analyzing word choices in "The Raven" by Edgar Allan Poe in this interactive tutorial. In this tutorial, you will examine word meanings, examine subtle differences between words with similar meanings, and think about emotions connected to specific words. You will also analyze the impact of specific word choices on the meaning of the poem.

This tutorial is Part One of a two-part series on Poe's "The Raven." Click HERE to open Part Two.

Analyzing Rhetoric in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird

Analyze the use of rhetoric in a courtroom speech from Harper Lee’s novel To Kill a Mockingbird. In this interactive tutorial, we'll break down the speech to analyze its use of persuasion. We'll also examine how the speech achieves its purpose through the use of pathos, ethos, and logos. 

Scout Learns Life Lessons: Analyzing How a Character Develops Themes

Examine some of the various topics and themes present in the American classic To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee. In this interactive tutorial, you'll read excerpts from the novel and examine the development of the main character, Scout. You'll analyze how her words and actions help develop the important themes of the novel. You'll wrap up the tutorial by creating your own theme statement based on the text.

Figure it Out!

Examine the use of hyperbole and personification in the prologue of the novel The Book Thief by Markus Zusak. In this interactive tutorial, you'll practice identifying examples of hyperbole and personification within the text. You'll also learn how these two types of figurative language help authors convey their intended meaning.

Analyzing A Complex Character - Fahrenheit 451

Analyze a complex character’s development in text excerpts from the novel Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. In this interactive tutorial, you'll analyze how the main character is described and developed through his interaction with other characters.

Greek Monsters on Parade

Learn how to determine the theme of a fictional text using excerpts from Book 12 of Homer's The Odyssey. In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn how to determine the theme of a text based on the characters and events of the story. You'll also practice distinguishing between themes and topics in a work of literature. Finally, you'll create your own theme statement for The Odyssey using details from the text.  

Teaching Ideas

Name Description
Are People Free?: Using a Discussion Web to Engage in Meaningful Collaboration

This teaching idea addresses the pros and cons of discussion by analyzing the concept of utopia in a satire. Students collaborate in small groups to create a Discussion Web that addresses the question, "Are people equal?" Students engage in meaningful discussions analyzing all sides of their initial response, form a consensus, and present it to the class. Students then read "Harrison Bergeron" by Kurt Vonnegut, Jr. and use supporting details to complete another Discussion Web that examines whether or not the people in the story are equal. Web-based graphic organizers, assessments, and extension activities are included.

Unlocking the Underlying Symbolism and Themes of a Dramatic Work

This lesson invites students to explore the things relevant to a character from Lorraine Hansberry's play A Raisin in the Sun, such as Mama's plant, to unlock the drama's underlying symbolism and themes. Students explore character traits and participate in active learning as they work with the play. Students use an interactive drama map to explore character and conflict, and then write and share character-item poems.

Text Resource

Name Description
Read Aloud with Audio Books

Lit2Go is a free online collection of stories and poems in Mp3 (audiobook) format. An abstract, citation, playing time, and word count are given for each of the passages. Many of the passages also have a related reading strategy identified. Each reading passage can also be downloaded as a PDF and printed for use as a read-along or as supplemental reading material for your classroom. The Flesch-Kincaid Readability formula is used to determine grade level appropriateness.

Unit/Lesson Sequence

Name Description
Sample English 2 Curriculum Plan Using CMAP

This sample English II CMAP is a fully customizable resource and curriculum-planning tool that provides a framework for the English II course. This CMAP is divided into 14 English Language Arts units and includes every standard from Florida's official course description for English II. The units and standards are customizable, and the CMAP allows instructors to add lessons, class notes, homework sheets, and other resources as needed. This CMAP also includes a row that automatically filters and displays e-learning Original Student Tutorials that are aligned to the standards and available on CPALMS.

Learn more about the sample English II CMAP, its features, and its customizability by watching this video:

Using this CMAP

To view an introduction on the CMAP tool, please .

To view the CMAP, click on the "Open Resource Page" button above; be sure you are logged in to your iCPALMS account.

To use this CMAP, click on the "Clone" button once the CMAP opens in the "Open Resource Page." Once the CMAP is cloned, you will be able to see it as a class inside your iCPALMS My Planner (CMAPs) app.

To access your My Planner App and the cloned CMAP, click on the iCPALMS tab in the top menu.

All CMAP tutorials can be found within the iCPALMS Planner App or at the following URL: http://www.cpalms.org/support/tutorials_and_informational_videos.aspx

Student Resources

Original Student Tutorials

Name Description
From Myth to Short Story: Drawing on Source Material – Part Two:

Examine the topics of transformation and perfection as you read excerpts from the “Myth of Pygmalion” by Ovid and the short story “The Birthmark” by Nathaniel Hawthorne. By the end of this two-part interactive tutorial series, you should be able to explain how the short story draws on and transforms source material from the original myth. 

This tutorial is the second in a two-part series. Click HERE to launch Part One.

From Myth to Short Story: Drawing on Source Material – Part One:

Examine the topics of transformation and perfection as you read excerpts from the “Myth of Pygmalion” by Ovid and the short story “The Birthmark” by Nathaniel Hawthorne. By the end of this two-part interactive tutorial series, you should be able to explain how the short story draws on and transforms source material from the original myth.  

This tutorial is the first in a two-part series. Click HERE to launch Part Two.

Light and Darkness in Two Artistic Mediums:

Study the poem “We Grow Accustomed to the Dark” by Emily Dickinson and view the painting The Starry Night by Vincent van Gogh to explain how each medium represents the subjects of light and darkness similarly and differently, as you complete this interactive tutorial.

Culture and Point of View in "The Overcoat" – Part Two:

Explore and explain multiple points of view in the story "The Overcoat" by Nikolai Gogol, which is set in 19th century St. Petersburg, Russia. In this interactive tutorial, you'll also observe the culture of this society from multiple angles. 

This is the second tutorial in a two-part series. Before completing this tutorial, click here to launch Part One.

Culture and Point of View in "The Overcoat" – Part One:

Learn multiple points of view in the story "The Overcoat" by Nikolai Gogol. In this two-part interactive tutorial, you’ll study excerpts from this story set in 19th century St. Petersburg, Russia. By the end of this tutorial series, you should be able to explain how the multiple points of view within the story allows readers to observe the culture of this society from multiple angles.

Make sure to complete both parts of this series! Click here to launch Part Two

Analyzing Word Choices in Poe's "The Raven" -- Part Two:

Practice analyzing word choices in "The Raven" by Edgar Allan Poe, including word meanings, subtle differences between words with similar meanings, and emotions connected to specific words. In this interactive tutorial, you will also analyze the impact of specific word choices on the meaning of the poem.

This is Part Two of a two-part series. Part One should be completed before beginning Part Two. Click HERE to open Part One.

Analyzing Word Choices in Poe's "The Raven" -- Part One:

Practice analyzing word choices in "The Raven" by Edgar Allan Poe in this interactive tutorial. In this tutorial, you will examine word meanings, examine subtle differences between words with similar meanings, and think about emotions connected to specific words. You will also analyze the impact of specific word choices on the meaning of the poem.

This tutorial is Part One of a two-part series on Poe's "The Raven." Click HERE to open Part Two.

Analyzing Rhetoric in Harper Lee's To Kill a Mockingbird:

Analyze the use of rhetoric in a courtroom speech from Harper Lee’s novel To Kill a Mockingbird. In this interactive tutorial, we'll break down the speech to analyze its use of persuasion. We'll also examine how the speech achieves its purpose through the use of pathos, ethos, and logos. 

Scout Learns Life Lessons: Analyzing How a Character Develops Themes:

Examine some of the various topics and themes present in the American classic To Kill A Mockingbird by Harper Lee. In this interactive tutorial, you'll read excerpts from the novel and examine the development of the main character, Scout. You'll analyze how her words and actions help develop the important themes of the novel. You'll wrap up the tutorial by creating your own theme statement based on the text.

Figure it Out! :

Examine the use of hyperbole and personification in the prologue of the novel The Book Thief by Markus Zusak. In this interactive tutorial, you'll practice identifying examples of hyperbole and personification within the text. You'll also learn how these two types of figurative language help authors convey their intended meaning.

Analyzing A Complex Character - Fahrenheit 451:

Analyze a complex character’s development in text excerpts from the novel Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury. In this interactive tutorial, you'll analyze how the main character is described and developed through his interaction with other characters.

Greek Monsters on Parade:

Learn how to determine the theme of a fictional text using excerpts from Book 12 of Homer's The Odyssey. In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn how to determine the theme of a text based on the characters and events of the story. You'll also practice distinguishing between themes and topics in a work of literature. Finally, you'll create your own theme statement for The Odyssey using details from the text.  



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