Standard #: SS.912.A.7.5


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Compare nonviolent and violent approaches utilized by groups (African Americans, women, Native Americans, Hispanics) to achieve civil rights.


Clarifications


Examples may include, but are not limited to, sit-ins, Freedom Rides, boycotts, riots, protest marches.

This benchmark is annually evaluated on the United States History End-of-Course Assessment. For more information on how this benchmark is evaluated view the United States History End-of-Course Assessment Test Item Specifications pages 51-52. Additional resources may be found on the FLDOE End-of-Course (EOC) Assessments webpage and the FLDOE Social Studies webpage.

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Related Access Points

Access Point Number Access Point Title
SS.912.A.7.In.e Identify violent and nonviolent approaches used by groups, such as African Americans, women, Native Americans, and Hispanics, to achieve civil rights.
SS.912.A.7.Su.e Recognize violent and nonviolent approaches used by groups, such as African Americans, women, Native Americans, and Hispanics, to achieve civil rights.
SS.912.A.7.Pa.e Recognize that people act in violent and nonviolent ways to bring about change.


Related Resources

Assessment

Name Description
Quiz: The Civil Rights Movement

Try this 12-question multiple choice quiz to see how much you know about the Civil Rights Movement.

Lesson Plans

Name Description
Reading Like a Historian: Civil Rights Act

In this lesson, students analyze primary source documents in an effort to answer the central historical question: Was JFK a strong supporter of Civil Rights? First, the teacher streams a video clip from Discovery Education on JFK and civil rights. Students form a hypothesis and discuss whether JFK was "strong" on civil rights based on this. Students then read a 1963 JFK speech supporting the Civil Rights Act; as a class, they answer sourcing, close reading and context questions and revisit their hypothesis. Students then read John Lewis's controversial original draft of the speech he delivered at the March on Washington. They answer guiding questions which corroborate both documents and attempt to reach a conclusion. If there is time, the teacher may bookend the lesson with another clip which shows how LBJ signed the eventual law into action.

Reading Like a Historian: Montgomery Bus Boycott

In this lesson, students analyze primary source documents in an effort to answer the central historical question: Why did the Montgomery Bus Boycott succeed? The teacher first introduces the boycott and Rosa Parks by streaming a film clip from historicalthinkingmatters.org. Students then break into 3 groups and look at a textbook account of the boycott and a timeline, making a "claim" as to why the boycott succeeded and sharing it with the whole class. The groups then corroborate with 2 more documents-a letter by Jo Ann Robinson and a memo by Bayard Rustin-and make another claim. Finally, 2 more documents-a letter by Virginia Durr and a speech by Martin Luther King, Jr.-are added to the mix, and students formulate and share a final claim. In a final class discussion, students reflect on how their claims did/did not change as they encountered more evidence.

Text Resource

Name Description
The Freedom Riders, Then and Now

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the Social Studies content area. It is most appropriate for 11th-12th grade students enrolled in a U.S. History class. This article both retells the struggles of the Freedom Riders who were beaten and arrested in 1961, and also interviews them on their experiences, more than 50 years later. It is accompanies by a photo gallery of before/after photos of the Freedom Riders.

Tutorials

Name Description
We Shall Overcome

In this webisode brought to you by PBS, you will explore key events that took place in American history from 1963-1968, including the Vietnam War and the Civil Rights Movement. In this resource you can examine primary source documents and photographs, listen to segments of key speeches, examine a timeline and glossary, take a quiz, and explore additional resources connected to this era. Enjoy this journey into American history!

Let Freedom Ring

In this tutorial, you will explore key events that took place in American history from 1955-1963, including the rise of the Civil Rights Movement and early events in the Cold War. Through this interactive tutorial, you can examine primary source documents and photographs, listen to key speeches, and interact with a wealth of information during this webisode brought to you by PBS. The webisode even includes a timeline, glossary, quiz, and additional resources that you can examine to further explore this era. Enjoy this journey into American history!

Crash Course U.S. History: The Sixties

In this tutorial video, you'll take a whirlwind journey through the 1960s, a decade in American history marked by social, political, and governmental change, as well as influential leaders such as JFK and Martin Luther King, Jr. You'll learn more about the Civil Rights Movement and the laws and court decisions that sought to bring equality to more groups of people in our nation. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. History!

Crash Course U.S. History: Civil Rights and the 1950s

In this tutorial video, you'll take a whirlwind journey through key events of the Civil Rights Movement in the 1950s in America. During this time, society focused on achieving equal rights and more protections for all groups in America, especially African-Americans. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. History!

Student Resources

Assessment

Name Description
Quiz: The Civil Rights Movement :

Try this 12-question multiple choice quiz to see how much you know about the Civil Rights Movement.

Tutorials

Name Description
We Shall Overcome:

In this webisode brought to you by PBS, you will explore key events that took place in American history from 1963-1968, including the Vietnam War and the Civil Rights Movement. In this resource you can examine primary source documents and photographs, listen to segments of key speeches, examine a timeline and glossary, take a quiz, and explore additional resources connected to this era. Enjoy this journey into American history!

Let Freedom Ring:

In this tutorial, you will explore key events that took place in American history from 1955-1963, including the rise of the Civil Rights Movement and early events in the Cold War. Through this interactive tutorial, you can examine primary source documents and photographs, listen to key speeches, and interact with a wealth of information during this webisode brought to you by PBS. The webisode even includes a timeline, glossary, quiz, and additional resources that you can examine to further explore this era. Enjoy this journey into American history!

Crash Course U.S. History: The Sixties:

In this tutorial video, you'll take a whirlwind journey through the 1960s, a decade in American history marked by social, political, and governmental change, as well as influential leaders such as JFK and Martin Luther King, Jr. You'll learn more about the Civil Rights Movement and the laws and court decisions that sought to bring equality to more groups of people in our nation. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. History!

Crash Course U.S. History: Civil Rights and the 1950s:

In this tutorial video, you'll take a whirlwind journey through key events of the Civil Rights Movement in the 1950s in America. During this time, society focused on achieving equal rights and more protections for all groups in America, especially African-Americans. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. History!



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