Standard #: SC.912.P.12.6


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Qualitatively apply the concept of angular momentum.


General Information

Subject Area: Science
Grade: 912
Body of Knowledge: Physical Science
Standard: Motion -

A. Motion can be measured and described qualitatively and quantitatively. Net forces create a change in motion. When objects travel at speeds comparable to the speed of light, Einstein's special theory of relativity applies.

B. Momentum is conserved under well-defined conditions. A change in momentum occurs when a net force is applied to an object over a time interval.

C. The Law of Universal Gravitation states that gravitational forces act on all objects irrespective of their size and position.

D. Gases consist of great numbers of molecules moving in all directions. The behavior of gases can be modeled by the kinetic molecular theory.

E. Chemical reaction rates change with conditions under which they occur. Chemical equilibrium is a dynamic state in which forward and reverse processes occur at the same rates.

Date Adopted or Revised: 02/08
Date of Last Rating: 05/08
Status: State Board Approved

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Related Access Points

Access Point Number Access Point Title
SC.912.P.12.In.3 Recognize various situations that show Newton’s third law of motion: for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.
SC.912.P.12.Su.3 Recognize the action and reaction in a situation that show Newton’s third law of motion: for every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.
SC.912.P.12.Pa.3 Identify the source of the force moving an object.


Related Resources

Lesson Plans

Name Description
Spinning Around - Angular Momentum

Students are introduced to the concept of angular momentum using a Predict-Observe-Explain model demonstration involving a rotating stool, small weights, and a bicycle wheel with handles. If you do not have access to these materials, website links with appropriate videos are provided in the teacher materials.

The Physics of Pool The objective of this lesson is to illustrate how a common everyday experience (such as playing pool) can often provide a learning moment. In the example chosen, we use the game of pool to help explain some key concepts of physics. One of these concepts is the conservation of linear momentum since conservation laws play an extremely important role in many aspects of physics. The idea that a certain property of a system is maintained before and after something happens is quite central to many principles in physics and in the pool example, we concentrate on the conservation of linear momentum. The latter half of the video looks at angular momentum and friction, examining why certain objects roll, as opposed to slide. We do this by looking at how striking a ball with a cue stick at different locations produces different effects.

Though not required, students who have been exposed to some physics would benefit most from this video. In mathematically rigorous classes, students can concentrate on the details of vectors and conservation of linear momentum.

No materials are required for this lesson, and it can be completed easily within a class period.
How Mosquitoes Can Fly in the Rain In this lesson, we learn how insects can fly in the rain. The objective is to calculate the impact forces of raindrops on flying mosquitoes. Students will gain experience with using Newton's laws, gathering data from videos and graphs, and most importantly, the utility of making approximations. No calculus will be used in this lesson, but familiarity with torque and force balances is suggested. No calculators will be needed, but students should have pencil and paper to make estimations and, if possible, copies of the graphs provided with the lesson. Between lessons, students are recommended to discuss the assignments with their neighbors.

Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiast

Name Description
Shaping Pottery with Angular Momentum

Factors to consider when making pottery on the wheel are discussed, but not in a way that would make your head spin.

Download the CPALMS Perspectives video student note taking guide.

Video/Audio/Animations

Name Description
MIT BLOSSOMS - The Physics of Boomerangs

This learning video explores the mysterious physics behind boomerangs and other rapidly spinning objects. Students will get to make and throw their own boomerangs between video segments! A key idea presented is how torque causes the precession of angular momentum. One class period is required to complete this learning video, and the optimal prerequisites are a familiarity with forces, Newton's laws, vectors and time derivatives. Each student would need the following materials for boomerang construction: cardboard (roughly the size of a postcard), ruler, pencil/pen, scissors, protractor, and a stapler.

Science of the Olympic Winter Games - Aerial Physics A 4-minute video in which an Olympic freestyle skier and a physicist discuss the physics behind freestyle skiing.
MIT BLOSSOMS - Ice Skater’s Delight: The Conservation of Angular Momentum

This learning video describes within an action orientation certain often difficult-to-understand concepts of Newtonian physics. The conservation of momentum is extended to rotational situations, and some of the results may be counter-intuitive! As Professor Lewin states in the opening segment, the prerequisite necessary for this lesson includes familiarity with the concepts of torque, angular velocity, angular momentum and moment of inertia. This interactive video lesson can easily be completed within a 55-minute class period, and the only material required is a blackboard/whiteboard to write on. During the breaks between video segments, students will be asked to think about and discuss: conditions under which angular momentum is either conserved or not conserved; examples in which the moment of inertia changes; a human ice skater and a rough estimation of her moment of inertia; as well as other topics.

Student Resources

Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiast

Name Description
Shaping Pottery with Angular Momentum:

Factors to consider when making pottery on the wheel are discussed, but not in a way that would make your head spin.

Download the CPALMS Perspectives video student note taking guide.

Video/Audio/Animation

Name Description
Science of the Olympic Winter Games - Aerial Physics: A 4-minute video in which an Olympic freestyle skier and a physicist discuss the physics behind freestyle skiing.


Parent Resources

Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiast

Name Description
Shaping Pottery with Angular Momentum:

Factors to consider when making pottery on the wheel are discussed, but not in a way that would make your head spin.

Download the CPALMS Perspectives video student note taking guide.

Video/Audio/Animation

Name Description
Science of the Olympic Winter Games - Aerial Physics: A 4-minute video in which an Olympic freestyle skier and a physicist discuss the physics behind freestyle skiing.


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