Evaluating an Argument – Part One: JFK’s Inaugural Address

Resource ID#: 178829 Type: Original Student Tutorial
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General Information

Subject(s): English Language Arts
Grade Level(s): 9, 10
Intended Audience: Students
Instructional Time: 35 Minute(s)
Keywords: English Language Arts, John F. Kennedy, Kennedy's inaugural address, reasons , evidence, ELA, literary nonfiction, presidential speeches, arguments, claims, JFK, speeches, historical speeches, presidential inauguration, e-learning, interactive, tutorials, e learning, English, Language Arts, American speeches, American presidential speeches, historical American speeches
Instructional Component Type(s): Original Student Tutorial

Aligned Standards

This vetted resource aligns to concepts or skills in these benchmarks.

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