Analyzing Word Choice in Emerson's "Self-Reliance": Part 2

Resource ID#: 174954 Type: Original Student Tutorial
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Attachments

Accessible Version Accessible version of the tutorial content in a pdfformat, updated Dec 13, 2021

General Information

Subject(s): English Language Arts, English Language Arts (B.E.S.T. - Effective starting 2021-2022)
Grade Level(s): 11, 12
Intended Audience: Students
Instructional Time: 35 Minute(s)
Keywords: English Language Arts, Ralph Waldo Emerson, Self-Reliance, connotation, denotation, travel, word meanings, vocabulary, tutorials, transcendentalists, nonfiction essay, literary nonfiction, nonfiction, interactive, elearning, e-learning, word choice, English, Language Arts, ELA, informational text
Instructional Component Type(s): Original Student Tutorial

Aligned Standards

This vetted resource aligns to concepts or skills in these benchmarks.

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Explore excerpts from Ralph Waldo Emerson's essay "Self-Reliance" in this two-part interactive tutorial series. You will examine word meanings, examine subtle differences between words with similar meanings, and think about the emotions or associations that are connected to specific words. Finally, you will analyze the impact of specific word choices on the meaning of these excerpts.

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