Standard 5: American Revolution & Birth of a New Nation

General Information
Number: SS.5.A.5
Title: American Revolution & Birth of a New Nation
Type: Standard
Subject: Social Studies
Grade: 5
Strand: American History

Related Benchmarks

This cluster includes the following benchmarks.

Related Access Points

This cluster includes the following access points.

Access Points

SS.5.A.5.AP.1
Identify events that led up to the American Revolution.
SS.5.A.5.AP.2
Identify a significant individual who contributed to the American Revolution.
SS.5.A.5.AP.3
Identify that the Declaration of Independence stated that colonists wanted freedom from England.
SS.5.A.5.AP.4
Identify a significant woman from the American Revolution.
SS.5.A.5.AP.5
Recognize a major battle in the American Revolution.
SS.5.A.5.AP.6
Recognize that the colonies needed help from other countries to win the American Revolution.
SS.5.A.5.AP.7
Identify factors that helped colonists win the Revolution.
SS.5.A.5.AP.8
Recognize that the colonists needed more money and supplies after the American Revolution.
SS.5.A.5.AP.9
Recognize that the United States wanted to add new land after the Revolution.
SS.5.A.5.AP.10
Recognize that the Constitution outlines the principles of the American government.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this topic.

Data Set

Measuring Loyalism in America c. 1775-1785:

This infographic shows both the level of Loyalism in America during the American Revolution and the extent of postwar Loyalist migration.

Type: Data Set

Educational Game

Tic Tac Toe Bill of Rights:

In this lesson, students will review what they already know about the Bill of Rights by completing a Bill of Rights Tic-Tac-Toe board of choice assignments.  

Type: Educational Game

Lesson Plans

Cause for a Constitution: Part 2:

In this lesson, students will read an informational text describing the reasons why we have a U.S. Constitution and how it's written (articles, preambles, amendments). After teacher modeling, students will work individually or in pairs to use the text from Lesson 1 and the text from Lesson 2 to complete a cause and effect thinking map. This is lesson 2 of 3 in a mini-unit integrating civics and social studies.

Type: Lesson Plan

Cause for a Constitution: Part 1:

In this lesson, students will read an informational text about the events leading up to the American Revolution. They will discuss the preamble to the U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights. Students will engage in a discourse circle about how the experiences of the colonists leading up to the American Revolution laid the groundwork that would later be reflected in the Constitution. This is lesson 1 of 3 in a mini-unit integrating civics and social studies.

Type: Lesson Plan

What Happens When A Patriot, Loyalist, and Colonist Have a Conversation?:

Students will work collaboratively to create a script to show their understanding of the political ideas of Patriots, Loyalists, and Colonists and the parts they played in the events that led to the American Revolution. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Patriot Leaders and their Perspectives :

Students will learn about colonists who were Patriots during the American Revolution. Students will identify different Patriot perspectives regarding independence, roles in the American Revolution, and political beliefs. After this lesson, students will be able to identify similarities of colonial Patriots and what it meant to be a Patriot.

Type: Lesson Plan

Roles of Colonists, Patriots, and Loyalists:

In this lesson plan, students will understand the roles of colonists, patriots, and loyalists and their role leading up to the American Revolution.

Type: Lesson Plan

Part 2: The Declaration of Independence Gives Us Unalienable Rights:

This lesson will allow the students to analyze primary sources while recognizing that the Declaration of Independence affirms that every U.S. citizen has certain unalienable rights. Students will identify the grievances detailed in the Declaration of Independence and track the development of this argument while explaining the reasoning. Students will write an expository piece about the consequences the British government faced for not recognizing that citizens have certain unalienable rights.

Type: Lesson Plan

Part 1: The Declaration of Independence Gives Us Unalienable Rights:

This lesson will allow the students to analyze primary sources while recognizing that the Declaration of Independence affirms that every U.S. citizen has certain unalienable rights. Students will understand the importance of the Preamble to the Declaration of Independence and create new meanings to certain words in the Preamble.  The students will engage in a classroom discussion about the Preamble, it's purpose, and how the Preamble would be different if it was written today.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Lead Up to the American Revolution:

In this lesson plan, students will learn about some of the most influential events that led to the American Revolution. They will read around the room on posters with important information as they fill out their outline.

Type: Lesson Plan

A Controversial Constitution:

In this lesson, students will identify the Federalists’ and Anti-Federalists’ arguments regarding the ratification of the U.S. Constitution. Students will collaborate to analyze the ideas about the U.S. Constitution put forth by the Federalists and the Anti-Federalists.

Type: Lesson Plan

Checks and Balances - Why and How?:

In this lesson plan, students will review the three branches of government as outlined by the U.S. Constitution.  Following the review, the students will get a chance to role-play the system of checks and balances to apply the principles of the Constitution to protect citizens from outlandish laws.

Type: Lesson Plan

Securing the Job :

In this lesson plan, students explore Florida’s legislative branch of government, receiving an overview of this branch of government, a comparison to the federal government’s legislative branch, and the necessary qualifications to run for Congress in Florida. Students will also explore the term length, authority, duties, and compensation for Congress.

Type: Lesson Plan

Am I a Patriot, Loyalist or Neutral?:

The main purpose of this lesson is to allow students to engage in active discussion and persuasive arguments regarding the choice to be a Patriot, Loyalist, or remain neutral (undecided) during the American Revolution.

Type: Lesson Plan

Declaration of Independence thru the Eyes of a Child:

In this lesson plan, students will be able to break down the Declaration of Independence and understand the reasons colonists needed to break away from England and the main reasons leading up to the American Revolution.

Type: Lesson Plan

Let's Connect - Declaration of Independence and Events leading up to it:

In this lesson plan, students will learn about important events leading up to the writing of the Declaration of Independence and then make the connection between those events and the grievances found in the Declaration of Independence. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Civic Participation: Expansion of Voting Rights :

In this lesson, students will analyze how the United States Constitution expanded civic participation over time. Students will make this determination by looking closely at the expansion of voting rights through the passage of the 15th, 19th, 24th, and 26th Amendments and the Voting Rights Act of 1965. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Who Represents Florida? - The Senate :

In this lesson plan, students will review the legislative branch and learn about the history of the Senate. Students will look at the term length of senators, as well as the duties and authority of the Senate.  Students will then identify 4 senators that have represented and served Florida at the national level, across the course of history, through the development and completion of a timeline.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

Who Represents Florida - U.S. House of Representatives :

In this lesson plan, students will briefly revisit the legislative branch, key jobs of the branch, and key facts about the House of Representatives.  Students will then identify the state’s U.S. representative(s) for their district. Students will develop a biography sheet for the representative for their district.

Type: Lesson Plan

Aaron & Alexander: Lesson 4 - Central Idea and Relevant Details - Alexander Hamilton:

This lesson focuses on the life of Alexander Hamilton, his political participation during and after the American Revolution, and his impact on the foundation of the United States. Students will read a brief passage about Hamilton's life, identify each paragraph's central idea and explain how relevant details support the central idea. This is a prereading lesson, the 4th lesson in a unit using the text, Aaron and Alexander; The Most Famous Duel in American History by Don Brown.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Aaron and Alexander: Lesson 2 Significant People:

In lesson 2 of this unit, students choose one person to research from the Revolutionary War as a prereading activity for the text, Aaron and Alexander: The Most Famous Duel in American History, by Don Brown. The teacher presents information about King George III. The options for students are George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, John Adams, and George Mason. Students conduct research using the research notetaker, then present important information to a small group of peers about the person they learned about.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Change a Law, Change History:

In this lesson plan, students will participate in a gallery walk of amendments to the U.S. Constitution. Students will illustrate and interpret the meaning of the amendments that cause major changes to the laws of the United States. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Aaron and Alexander: Lesson 1: Revolutionary War:

Students will read background information about the Revolutionary War. While they are reading, they will learn about the Stamp Act and Townshend Acts. In addition, the students will complete a jigsaw activity to find relevant details that support the central idea of the text.  To end the lesson, students will write a summary, using the central idea and relevant details from the passage about the Revolutionary War.

This is the first lesson to use in the Aaron and Alexander text unit. This lesson should be taught before reading the book.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

So What? What's the Big Deal about the "Star-Spangled Banner"?:

To understand the overarching themes of freedom and resiliency in the United States of American, students will identify and analyze the figurative language in the poem “Defence of Fort M’Henry” which turned into our National Anthem. After close reading and group consensus conversation, and possible extension exploration & research, a written or digital presentation which demonstrates students understanding of the “Star-Spangled Banner’s” significance as a symbol of the United States will be the resulting work product of this integrated lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Federalism and Government Powers:

In this lesson, students explore federalism and its importance through a slideshow, guided notes, a reading, independent practice, and an exit ticket.  The lesson contains opportunities for discussion, assesssment, and reflection. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Patriots or Loyalists: Which side would you choose?:

This lesson guides students through understanding the difference between a Patriot and a Loyalist during the colonial period and the start of the Revolutionary War.  Students will be given a side to defend in a constructive conversation after reading several passages and reviewing a point/counterpoint document.

Type: Lesson Plan

Revolutionary War Feelings:

Students will read an excerpt of a firsthand account from a Patriot, Loyalist, or other colonist. Students will then decide which colonist they identify with most closely and analyze the author’s perspective about the Revolutionary War in this integrated lesson.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Three Branches of Government :

In this student-guided presentation on the three branches of government, students will evaluate the choices and impacts of those choices made in the U.S. Constitution that provide the structure, power, and functions of the federal government. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Student Inquiry: How did the U.S. Constitution Influence the Florida Constitution?:

In this inquiry lesson, students will investigate using compelling and supporting questions, the impact of the U.S. Constitution on the Florida Constitution. The method of student-group demonstrations of learning is suggested, but flexible. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Our Government is Branching Out:

In this lesson plan, students will be introduced to how the U.S. structures its government into three branches and what each branch’s basic functions are.

Type: Lesson Plan

Robot Dogs and the Declaration of Independence:

In this lesson plan, students will recognize that the Declaration of Independence affirms that every American has certain unalienable rights. Students will identify different sections, principles, and grievances in the Declaration and will analyze why the assertion of these rights is fundamental to successful governance.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Seal, Bill, Song, and Proclamation: Recognizing Symbols of the United States :

In this lesson plan, students will explain how the Great Seal, Bill of Rights, Star-Spangled Banner, and Emancipation Proclamation represent the United States. Students will create their own symbols to represent themselves.

Type: Lesson Plan

Rights and Liberties in the Bill of Rights:

In this lesson, students will identify the rights protected by each of the first ten amendments to the U.S. Constitution. They will analyze the importance of protections for individual liberties and limitations on the power of government. They will then determine the weight of importance of the various rights and liberties protected by the Bill of Rights. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Why Have a Bill of Rights?:

In this lesson, students will learn who the Federalists and Anti-Federalists were before examining quotes, dialogue, and scenarios to evaluate the viewpoints of each.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Articles of Confederation:

In this lesson, students will learn about the Articles of Confederation and identify it as the first constitution of the United States. Students will analyze the weaknesses of the Articles of Confederation and learn how these weaknesses led to problems. Students will then discover how the issues were addressed in the U.S. Constitution.

Type: Lesson Plan

Principles of the U.S. Constitution:

In this lesson plan, students will analyze how the Constitution is limited by the following concepts; popular sovereignty, rule of law, separation of powers, checks and balances, federalism, the amendment process, and the fundamental rights of citizens in the Bill of Rights.

Type: Lesson Plan

Patriot or Loyalist? You Decide:

In this lesson, students will hear brief perspectives from a Loyalist, a Patriot, and a neutral colonist. They will work collaboratively to try to determine where historical figures aligned during the time of the American Revolution.

Type: Lesson Plan

Women Warriors:

This is a MEA that looks at the contribution of some women that helped out during the American Revolution.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Beginning of A Revolution:

In this lesson students learn about the American Revolution. Students will be required to use two or more texts to summarize information some aspect of the American Revolution as well as create a timeline of important events leading up to the Revolutionary War.

Type: Lesson Plan

A "Revolutionary" Approach to Learning History:

Students will research causes leading up to the Revolutionary War and their specific effects. They will use various informational text resources to research a particular central event during this time period and place key points into a cause and effect graphic organizer. Working in small groups, they will compose a reader's theatre script depicting what they gathered in their research. They will rehearse and present their reader's theatre to their classmates.

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorials

The U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights:

Learn about the history and background of the U.S. Constitution and how the Constitution and Bill of Rights safeguards our rights and liberties in this interactive tutorial. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Meet the Declaration of Independence:

Learn about important historical documents that influenced political concepts in the United States and that the Declaration of Independence affirms all citizens have certain unalienable rights with this interactive tutorial. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Presentation/Slideshow

Slideshow: Meet the Declaration of Independence:

This PowerPoint slideshow is designed to support teachers in delivering direct instruction on the Declaration of Independence and the unalienable rights granted to all citizens. The accompanying guided notes can be completed by students during instruction.

Type: Presentation/Slideshow

Teaching Idea

Importance of Rules and the Bill of Rights:

This web resource provides students with support in understanding the importance of having rules (laws) in society, learning how they are addressed in the U.S Constitution, and gaining an understanding of the Bill of Rights.

Type: Teaching Idea

Text Resource

Home at Mount Vernon:

This resource from George Washington's Mount Vernon contains a short play about the life of slaves, indentured servants, and others during the time of Washington's presidency. A narrative version, written as a story, is also available.

  • Students will learn about the various people who lived and worked at George Washington's Mount Vernon in the 18th century.
  • Students will understand the societal, cultural, and economic conditions of 18th century American life that sustained plantation life.

Type: Text Resource

Video/Audio/Animation

Yorktown: Now or Never:

View a 10-part video on the Battle of Yorktown, the culminating battle of the Revolutionary War. With French aid, George Washington led American troops to a victory that ensured American independence.

In addition to the video, you will find primary source documents and a graphic organizer to help you analyze the Battle of Yorktown in greater detail.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this topic.

Original Student Tutorials

The U.S. Constitution and Bill of Rights:

Learn about the history and background of the U.S. Constitution and how the Constitution and Bill of Rights safeguards our rights and liberties in this interactive tutorial. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Meet the Declaration of Independence:

Learn about important historical documents that influenced political concepts in the United States and that the Declaration of Independence affirms all citizens have certain unalienable rights with this interactive tutorial. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Video/Audio/Animation

Yorktown: Now or Never:

View a 10-part video on the Battle of Yorktown, the culminating battle of the Revolutionary War. With French aid, George Washington led American troops to a victory that ensured American independence.

In addition to the video, you will find primary source documents and a graphic organizer to help you analyze the Battle of Yorktown in greater detail.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this topic.