Standard 5: Analyze the effects of the changing social, political, and economic conditions of the Roaring Twenties and the Great Depression.

General Information
Number: SS.912.A.5
Title: Analyze the effects of the changing social, political, and economic conditions of the Roaring Twenties and the Great Depression.
Type: Standard
Subject: Social Studies
Grade: 912
Strand: American History

Related Benchmarks

This cluster includes the following benchmarks.

Related Access Points

This cluster includes the following access points.

Independent

SS.912.A.5.In.a
Identify an economic result of demobilization, such as reintegration of soldiers into civilian life or reconstruction.
SS.912.A.5.In.b
Identify the causes and reactions associated with the Red Scare, such as fear of a communist revolution, strikes by workers, laws limiting immigration, and racial unrest.
SS.912.A.5.In.c
Identify impacts of United States government economic policies during the 1920s, such as tax cuts, a reduction in federal spending, and high tariffs.
SS.912.A.5.In.d
Identify results of the economic boom of the Roaring Twenties, such as the rise of automobile ownership, the mass production of goods, and the use of marketing.
SS.912.A.5.In.e
Identify actions of the United States and world powers to avoid future wars, such as forming the League of Nations.
SS.912.A.5.In.f
Identify the influences of Hollywood, the Harlem Renaissance, and prohibition on American society in the 1920s.
SS.912.A.5.In.g
Identify the effects of freedom movements that advocated for civil rights for African Americans, Latinos, Asians, and women, such as a feeling of unity and a sense of community.
SS.912.A.5.In.h
Identify the major view of a leader relating to the African American experience, such as Booker T. Washington, W.E.B. DuBois, or Marcus Garvey.
SS.912.A.5.In.i
Identify that support of the Ku Klux Klan changed during the 1920s with respect to groups, such as immigrants, African Americans, Catholics, Jews, women, and unions.
SS.912.A.5.In.j
Identify reasons why there was support for and resistance to civil rights for women, African Americans, Native Americans, and other minorities.
SS.912.A.5.In.k
Identify a cause of the Great Depression, such as drought, inflation, or the stock market crash, and a consequence, such as the New Deal plan for relief, recovery, and reform.
SS.912.A.5.In.l
Identify key events and people in Florida, such as the Florida land boom, air conditioning, New Deal programs, and Marjorie Kinnan Rawlings.

Supported

SS.912.A.5.Su.a
Recognize a result of demobilization, such as the reintegration of soldiers into civilian life.
SS.912.A.5.Su.b
Recognize a cause and a reaction of the Red Scare, such as fear of a communist revolution, strikes by workers, laws limiting immigration, or racial unrest.
SS.912.A.5.Su.c
Recognize an impact of United States government economic policies during the 1920s, such as tax cuts, a reduction in federal spending, and high tariffs.
SS.912.A.5.Su.d
Recognize a result of the economic boom of the Roaring Twenties, such as the rise of automobile ownership, the mass production of goods, or the use of marketing.
SS.912.A.5.Su.e
Recognize that the League of Nations was formed to prevent wars.
SS.912.A.5.Su.f
Recognize an influence of Hollywood, the Harlem Renaissance, or prohibition on American society in the 1920s.
SS.912.A.5.Su.g
Recognize the effects of freedom movements that advocated for civil rights for African Americans, Latinos, Asians, and women, such as a feeling of unity and a sense of community.
SS.912.A.5.Su.h
Recognize the view of a leader relating to the African American experience, such as the way African Americans should go about obtaining their rights.
SS.912.A.5.Su.i
Recognize that support of the Ku Klux Klan changed during the 1920s with respect to groups, such as immigrants, African Americans, Catholics, Jews, women, and unions.
SS.912.A.5.Su.j
Recognize a reason why there was support for and resistance to civil rights for women, African Americans, Native Americans, and other minorities.
SS.912.A.5.Su.k
Recognize a cause of the Great Depression, such as drought, inflation, or the stock market crash, and a consequence, such as the New Deal plan for relief, recovery, and reform.
SS.912.A.5.Su.l
Recognize key events in Florida, such as the Florida land boom and the development of air conditioning.

Participatory

SS.912.A.5.Pa.a
Recognize that soldiers return home after a war.
SS.912.A.5.Pa.b
Recognize behaviors that result from fears.
SS.912.A.5.Pa.c
Recognize that the government makes rules about taxes and spending.
SS.912.A.5.Pa.d
Recognize that when people have more money, they can buy more goods.
SS.912.A.5.Pa.e
Recognize that countries want to prevent wars.
SS.912.A.5.Pa.f
Recognize the influences of groups with different beliefs.
SS.912.A.5.Pa.g
Recognize that people in the same ethnic group may feel a sense of community.
SS.912.A.5.Pa.h
Recognize that people in the same ethnic group may feel a sense of community.
SS.912.A.5.Pa.i
Recognize that groups may fear people who are different.
SS.912.A.5.Pa.j
Recognize that groups may fear people who are different.
SS.912.A.5.Pa.k
Recognize that people struggle to meet their needs when they don’t have enough money.
SS.912.A.5.Pa.l
Recognize an important development in Florida, such as air conditioning.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this topic.

Assessments

Quiz: America in the 1920s:

Test your knowledge of the "Roaring Twenties" with a 9-question multiple choice quiz provided by Khan Academy. Good luck!

Type: Assessment

Quiz: The Great Depression:

Test your knowledge of the Great Depression and the New Deal with this 15-question multiple choice quiz provided by Khan Academy. Good luck!

Type: Assessment

Lesson Plans

Zora Neale Hurston and the WPA in Florida: Zora Neale Hurston, the WPA and the Cross City Turpentine Camp:

In 1939, Hurston went to Cross City in Dixie County, Florida, to interview workers of the Aycock and Lindsay turpentine camp. Turpentine camps were isolated and known for their terrible working conditions and abuses. It was unusual for a writer to be allowed in to gather information. Hurston's essay, entitled "," is one of the few firsthand accounts written about the lives of the turpentine workers.

In this lesson, students will examine the essay, "" as a primary source document using the document analysis worksheet from the National Archives.

Type: Lesson Plan

Where is the Love? Civil Rights in America:

In this lesson, students will integrate and evaluate multiple sources of information about Brown v. Board of Education and the struggle for civil rights before and after the case through discussion, music, and video, using reasoning and evidence from class discussions to be inspired to do their part to educate and stop discrimination.

Type: Lesson Plan

Reading Like a Historian: New Deal SAC:

In this lesson, designed to follow a more general study of the New Deal, students analyze primary and secondary source documents and engage in a Structured Academic Controversy in an effort to answer the central historical question: Was the New Deal a success or a failure? Students receive 7 documents, including a "fireside chat" by FDR, an oral interview, a speech by a WPA representative, unemployment statistics, and song lyrics by the Carter Family. Students then divide into groups of 4 and into pairs within each group to analyze the documents using a graphic organizer. Each pair presents the argument to the other that the New Deal was either (Pair A) successful or (Pair B) a failure. Only at the end can students abandon their previous positions, reach consensus in writing as a group, and defend that view in a final class discussion.

Type: Lesson Plan

Reading Like a Historian: Social Security:

In this lesson, students analyze primary and secondary source documents in an effort to answer the central historical question: Which historical account of Social Security is more accurate? Students begin by responding to a prompt: should out-of-work Americans receive government assistance? The teacher then streams a video on the New Deal and its critics, including Huey Long, followed by discussion. Students then look at the summarized views of 2 historians, Carl Degler and Barton Bernstein. In pairs, students summarize and discuss. They then read 3 primary source documents: 1) a 1935 speech by FDR, 2) the testimony of NAACP spokesman Charles Houston before Congress, and 3) a letter to Mrs. Roosevelt by an anonymous critic of Social Security. For each, students answer guiding questions. In a final class discussion, students corroborate the documents and use them to side with the views of 1 historian-Degler or Bernstein-over the other.

Type: Lesson Plan

Reading Like a Historian: Scopes Trial:

In this lesson, students analyze primary source documents in an effort to answer the central historical question: Why did people care about the Butler Act? Students first read an excerpt from a 1914 textbook, A Civic Biology, and answer brief questions. The teacher then gives a mini-lecture on the rise of religious fundamentalism in the 1920s and streams a video clip on the Scopes Trial. Students fill out a graphic organizer during/after they watch and then they analyze 4 documents: 1) a letter to the editor of the Nashville Tennessean, 2) a speech from one of John Scopes' defense attorneys, 3) a magazine article written by a fundamentalist preacher, and 4) a New York Times article commenting on the media circus. For each, they answer guiding questions. A final class discussion contextualizes the documents: how did the context of the 1920s make this more than a simple debate over evolution?

Type: Lesson Plan

Reading Like a Historian: Palmer Raids:

In this lesson, students analyze primary source documents in an effort to answer the central historical question: What caused the Palmer Raids? The lesson begins by asking students what communism/socialism means to them. Students share answers in pairs. The teacher then provides background information on the Red Scare and follows up by streaming a film clip from Discovery Education. Students then analyze 2 documents-"The Case Against the Reds" by A. Mitchell Palmer and a deportation statement by Emma Goldman-and answer guiding questions for each. A final class discussion corroborates the documents: why did the nation allow the Palmer Raids to take place?

Type: Lesson Plan

Reading Like a Historian: Marcus Garvey:

In this lesson, students analyze primary source documents in an effort to answer the central historical question: Why was Marcus Garvey a controversial figure? Students first read their textbook's passage on Garvey and discuss; the teacher then distributes a timeline to extend students' background knowledge. The teacher may also (optional) stream some video clips on Garvey "In His Own Words," about 5 minutes total. Students then analyze 4 documents: 1) an excerpt from the Autobiography of Malcolm X, 2) a letter from NAACP members and others to the Attorney General complaining of Garvey, 3) a memo by J. Edgar Hoover, and 4) Garvey's own Autobiography. For all, students answer extensive guiding questions and engage in Socratic discussion with the teacher: why was Garvey so popular and controversial? Students then answer the question in writing using all the documents as evidence.

Type: Lesson Plan

Reading Like a Historian: Prohibition:

In this lesson, students analyze primary source documents in an effort to answer the central historical question: Why was the 18th Amendment adopted? Students first read the text of the amendment and answer brief guiding questions. Then, the teacher streams a video clip from Discovery Education about the temperance movement. Students then analyze, in small groups, 4 documents: 1) a statement by the National Temperance Council, 2) a New York Times article, 3) a propaganda poster, "Alcohol and Degeneracy," and 4) another such poster, "Children in Misery." For each, they answer detailed guiding questions. A final class discussion evaluates the strategies of temperance advocates: are their arguments convincing?

Type: Lesson Plan

Reading Like a Historian: Anti-Suffragists:

In this lesson, students analyze primary source documents in an effort to answer the central historical question: Why did people, including women, oppose women's suffrage? It is recommended (but not essential) that the teacher begin by screening some of the HBO film Iron Jawed Angels to start a discussion about the motives of anti-suffragists. In groups, students then analyze 3 documents: 1) an excerpt from Molly Seawell's anti-suffragist book, 2) an anti-suffrage newspaper article, and 3) a speech by Tennessee Congressman John Moon. For each, students answer questions on a graphic organizer. In a final class discussion, students discuss the validity of anti-suffragists' motives, relate them to the film, and discuss what other sources they might want to read for further corroboration and contextualization.

Type: Lesson Plan

Reading Like a Historian: Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. DuBois:

In this lesson, students analyze primary source documents in an effort to answer the central historical question: Who was a stronger advocate for African-Americans, Booker T. Washington or W.E.B. DuBois? The teacher first uses a mini-lecture and a streaming video clip from Discovery Education to explain late 19th-century race relations in the South. Students then analyze an excerpt from Washington's "Atlanta Compromise" speech as the teacher models-extensively-sourcing, contextualization, corroboration, and close reading techniques, answering questions on a graphic organizer. Students then do the same, on their own, with a selection from DuBois' Souls of Black Folk. A final class discussion evaluates the 2 men: who was more right in his approach, given the historical context?

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorials

Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal: The First Hundred Days, Part 2 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the famous first hundred days of Franklin D. Roosevelt's presidency.  You'll learn how FDR and his fellow New Dealers used government in an attempt to combat the worst economic disaster the U.S. has ever faced: The Great Depression.  

CLICK HERE to open Part 1.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Era of Jim Crow and the Nadir of Race Relations: Part 2 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the era of Jim Crow segregation and the larger context within which it flourished, the "Nadir" of American race relations.

CLICK HERE to open Part 1.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal: The First Hundred Days, Part 1 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the famous first hundred days of Franklin D. Roosevelt's presidency. You'll learn how FDR and his fellow New Dealers used government in an attempt to combat the worst economic disaster the U.S. has ever faced: The Great Depression.

CLICK HERE to open Part 2.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Era of Jim Crow and the Nadir of Race Relations: Part 1 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the era of Jim Crow segregation and the larger context within which it flourished, the "Nadir" of American race relations.

CLICK HERE to open Part 2. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Booker T. and W.E.B. (Part 2):

Learn about Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois and their rivalry of ideas in this interactive tutorial. Both men were African-American leaders during the "nadir" of race relations, but they had very different visions.

This is part 2 in a two-part series. CLICK HERE to open Part 1. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The "Isolationist" 1920s:

In this interactive tutorial, learn about a different side of the 1920s: the foreign and economic policies the U.S. pursued in the decade following World War I.  You'll learn about the treaties and agreements the U.S. entered into during this time in an effort to produce a more peaceful and stable world, and you'll evaluate the extent to which the U.S. truly pursued "isolationist" policies during the 1920s.   

Type: Original Student Tutorial

America in the 1920s: A Changing Political Culture:

In this interactive tutorial, take a look at America in the 1920s and the ways in which the changing political culture influenced American society. You'll explore the effects of Prohibition, including the rise of bootlegging and the increase in organized crime through the work of notorious gangsters like Al Capone. You'll also examine the changing role of women and look at one of the most popular symbols of the Roaring Twenties, that of the flapper. Finally, you will also study two notable movements of the era, Garveyism and Fundamentalism.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Booker T. and W.E.B. Part 1 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois and their rivalry of ideas.  Both men were African American leaders during the "Nadir" of race relations, but their visions were very different.  

CLICK HERE to open Part 2.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

America in the 1920s: The Influence of Arts and Entertainment, Part 2 (of 2):

Have you ever heard of the Jazz Age? How about the Roaring Twenties? Both of these labels describe an interesting era in American history, a time period that you'll take a look at in this two-part tutorial series.  In Part 2, you'll learn about Hollywood, movies, and celebrity culture during the 1920s.

CLICK HERE to open Part 1.

 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

America in the 1920s: The Influence of Arts and Entertainment, Part 1 (of 2):

Have you ever heard of the Jazz Age? How about the Roaring Twenties? Both of these labels describe an interesting era in American history, a time period that you'll take a look at in this two-part tutorial series. In Part 1, you'll learn about the birth of the Harlem Renaissance, the rise of jazz music, and some unusual fads that swept the nation. 

CLICK HERE to open Part 2.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Economy of the "Roaring Twenties":

In this interactive tutorial, learn about the economy of the 1920s, a decade often called the "Roaring Twenties."  You'll explore consumerism, advertising, the auto industry, and the stock market, as well as how the 1920s boom contributed to the Great Depression.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Postwar Blues...and Reds:

In this interactive tutorial, learn about the years immediately following World War I: 1919 and 1920.  These were dangerous years of economic depression, racial violence, and anti-immigrant nativism in the United States.  You'll learn about the Red Scare, the Palmer Raids, Sacco and Vanzetti, and the rise of the Ku Klux Klan.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Presentation/Slideshow

Reading Like a Historian: Background on Women’s Suffrage:

In this lesson, students view and discuss a PowerPoint presentation in an effort to answer the central historical questions: Why did people oppose women's suffrage? Did anti-suffragists think men were superior to women? As a starter, the teacher displays a photo of a WWI-era suffragette and asks students when they think the picture was taken. Then, using the PowerPoint, students review the history of the suffrage movement, starting with the Seneca Falls convention (the class pauses to read and discuss Mott and Stanton's "Declaration of Sentiments") and finishing with Alice Paul's acts of civil disobedience and the passage of the 19th Amendment. Discussion questions are included throughout.

Type: Presentation/Slideshow

Resource Collection

American Experience: Franklin D. Roosevelt:

This full-length video is a complete biography of Franklin D. Roosevelt, 32nd President of the United States. Topics touched on include the Great Depression, the New Deal, and World War II. Teachers should find the video an excellent resource to review or learn more about this time period.

The webpage also includes numerous shorter videos, articles, and primary sources about FDR, as well as a teacher's guide for using the film in class.

Type: Resource Collection

Text Resources

Supreme Court Landmark Case: Schechter v. U.S. (1935):

Learn more about the 1935 landmark Supreme Court decision Schechter v.U.S. In this Depression-era case, the Court ruled against one of the key parts of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal: the National Industrial Recovery Act (NIRA). Issues of economics, capitalism, and government power were all at stake.

Type: Text Resource

How the Civilian Conservation Corps Worked:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the Social Studies content area. It is most appropriate for 6th-8th grade students enrolled in a U.S. History class. In this essay, the author details the Depression-era Civilian Conservation Corps, explaining to readers how the organization formed, functioned and operated during its heyday in the 1930s.

Type: Text Resource

Who Stole Helen Keller?:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the Social Studies content area. It is most appropriate for 9th-10th grade students enrolled in a U.S. History class.

This essay is a reevaluation of the life and reputation of Helen Keller, especially as it is commonly (mis)represented in textbooks and biographies for young readers. The author argues that Keller should be remembered for far more than being courageous, as she was also a "defiant rebel" and a radical.

Type: Text Resource

What Caused the Dust Bowl?:

This informational text resource is intended to support reading in the Social Studies content area. It is most appropriate for 9th-10th grade students enrolled in a U.S. History class.

The author explains the causes of, and the attempted solutions to, the 1930s-era environmental catastrophe known as the Dust Bowl.

Type: Text Resource

Tutorials

FDR's First 100 Days & the New Deal:

Learn about President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal legislation that transformed the American government during the Great Depression. This short video describes several programs of the New Deal including the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), and the National Recovery Administration (NRA).

Type: Tutorial

Franklin Roosevelt & the New Deal:

Learn about President Franklin D. Roosevelt's efforts to stimulate the economy and combat unemployment during the Great Depression. This short video describes several programs from Roosevelt's New Deal including the National Youth Administration, the Rural Electrification Administration, and the Works Progress Administration.

Type: Tutorial

Examining the Life & Work of Eleanor Roosevelt:

In a series of short videos, learn about the life and work of Eleanor Roosevelt, wife of the 32nd president and niece of the 26th president. The first video details Eleanor's lonely childhood, the second describes her first involvement in American politics and public speaking, the third examines her work with organizations like the Red Cross and the League of Women Voters, and the fourth explains her role working with the United Nations and leading the committee that drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948. This pivotal document changed the way the world viewed the rights of people. Watch one video or enjoy them all!

Type: Tutorial

60-Second Presidents: Calvin Coolidge:

View a brief, funny video about the 30th President, Calvin Coolidge, who presided over an era of economic expansion during the "Roaring Twenties!"

Type: Tutorial

60-Second Presidents: Warren Harding:

View a short, funny video about the 29th President, Warren G. Harding, the first president of the 1920s, who offered Americans "a return to normalcy" after World War I!

Type: Tutorial

60-Second Presidents: Herbert Hoover:

View a brief, funny video about our 31st President, Herbert Hoover, a president known as a great organizer but a terrible politician.

Type: Tutorial

60-Second Presidents: Franklin D. Roosevelt:

View a brief, funny video about the 32nd President, Franklin D. Roosevelt, a man who ushered the U.S. out of the Great Depression and into World War II. Enjoy this quick trip through American history!

Type: Tutorial

Safe for Democracy:

In this webisode brought to you by PBS, you will explore key events that took place in American history from 1903-1927. Topics include the Wright Brothers, World War I, women's suffrage, Prohibition, jazz, Hollywood in the 1920s, and Charles Lindbergh. In this resource you can examine primary source documents and photographs, a timeline and glossary, take a quiz, and explore additional resources. Enjoy this journey into American history!

Type: Tutorial

Depression and War:

In this webisode brought to you by PBS, you will explore key events that took place leading up to and during the Great Depression and World War II. You can explore primary source documents and photographs, a timeline and a glossary, take a quiz, and investigate additional resources to learn more about these eras. Enjoy this journey into American history!

Type: Tutorial

The Civilian Conservation Corps:

In this tutorial, you will view a brief video about the purpose and function of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). The CCC was created by President Roosevelt through the New Deal program to promote economic growth and create jobs across the nation during the Great Depression.

Type: Tutorial

Crash Course U.S. History: The New Deal:

In this tutorial video, you will take a whirlwind journey through the New Deal, which was Franklin D. Roosevelt's plan to pull the United States out of the Great Depression of the 1930s. The New Deal consisted of a series of programs that were designed to provide relief, recovery, and/or reform. The video briefly describes a number of the New Deal programs, including the Social Security Act, the Public Works Administration, the Works Progress Administration, and the Agricultural Adjustment Act. The video also describes how the New Deal forever changed the relationship between the government and citizens of the United States. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. History!

Type: Tutorial

Crash Course U.S. History: The Great Depression:

In this tutorial video, you will take a whirlwind journey through the events that led up to the Great Depression. The video explores the possible causes of the Great Depression, including the economic, social and political changes that may have contributed to this financial crisis. The video also examines what took place after the Great Depression began, including the failure of many banks and massive unemployment across the nation. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. History!

Type: Tutorial

Crash Course U.S. History: The Roaring Twenties:

In this tutorial video, you will take a whirlwind journey through the glitz and glam that personifies the Roaring Twenties Era. In the decade known for its numerous social changes, you'll learn about the popularity of the automobile, the rise of Hollywood and celebrity culture, flappers, the economy, limits on immigration, the Scopes Trial, and much more. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. History.

Type: Tutorial

Crash Course U.S. History: The Progressive Era:

In this tutorial video, you'll take a whirlwind journey through the Progressive Era in American history. During this time, people were attempting to solve governmental and societal issues, all while trying to better implement equality for all. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. history!

Type: Tutorial

Video/Audio/Animations

How to Read a Document, Part 2: Analyzing FDR's Inaugural Address:

 

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

How to Read a Document, Part 1: Source Identification:

Learn how to "think like a historian" in this brief video from Khan Academy. Your hosts explain the difference between primary and secondary sources and analyze the beginning of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's First Inaugural Address.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this topic.

Original Student Tutorials

Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal: The First Hundred Days, Part 2 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the famous first hundred days of Franklin D. Roosevelt's presidency.  You'll learn how FDR and his fellow New Dealers used government in an attempt to combat the worst economic disaster the U.S. has ever faced: The Great Depression.  

CLICK HERE to open Part 1.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Era of Jim Crow and the Nadir of Race Relations: Part 2 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the era of Jim Crow segregation and the larger context within which it flourished, the "Nadir" of American race relations.

CLICK HERE to open Part 1.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Franklin Roosevelt's New Deal: The First Hundred Days, Part 1 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the famous first hundred days of Franklin D. Roosevelt's presidency. You'll learn how FDR and his fellow New Dealers used government in an attempt to combat the worst economic disaster the U.S. has ever faced: The Great Depression.

CLICK HERE to open Part 2.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Era of Jim Crow and the Nadir of Race Relations: Part 1 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the era of Jim Crow segregation and the larger context within which it flourished, the "Nadir" of American race relations.

CLICK HERE to open Part 2. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Booker T. and W.E.B. (Part 2):

Learn about Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois and their rivalry of ideas in this interactive tutorial. Both men were African-American leaders during the "nadir" of race relations, but they had very different visions.

This is part 2 in a two-part series. CLICK HERE to open Part 1. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The "Isolationist" 1920s:

In this interactive tutorial, learn about a different side of the 1920s: the foreign and economic policies the U.S. pursued in the decade following World War I.  You'll learn about the treaties and agreements the U.S. entered into during this time in an effort to produce a more peaceful and stable world, and you'll evaluate the extent to which the U.S. truly pursued "isolationist" policies during the 1920s.   

Type: Original Student Tutorial

America in the 1920s: A Changing Political Culture:

In this interactive tutorial, take a look at America in the 1920s and the ways in which the changing political culture influenced American society. You'll explore the effects of Prohibition, including the rise of bootlegging and the increase in organized crime through the work of notorious gangsters like Al Capone. You'll also examine the changing role of women and look at one of the most popular symbols of the Roaring Twenties, that of the flapper. Finally, you will also study two notable movements of the era, Garveyism and Fundamentalism.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Booker T. and W.E.B. Part 1 (of 2):

In Parts 1 and 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about Booker T. Washington and W.E.B. Du Bois and their rivalry of ideas.  Both men were African American leaders during the "Nadir" of race relations, but their visions were very different.  

CLICK HERE to open Part 2.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

America in the 1920s: The Influence of Arts and Entertainment, Part 2 (of 2):

Have you ever heard of the Jazz Age? How about the Roaring Twenties? Both of these labels describe an interesting era in American history, a time period that you'll take a look at in this two-part tutorial series.  In Part 2, you'll learn about Hollywood, movies, and celebrity culture during the 1920s.

CLICK HERE to open Part 1.

 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

America in the 1920s: The Influence of Arts and Entertainment, Part 1 (of 2):

Have you ever heard of the Jazz Age? How about the Roaring Twenties? Both of these labels describe an interesting era in American history, a time period that you'll take a look at in this two-part tutorial series. In Part 1, you'll learn about the birth of the Harlem Renaissance, the rise of jazz music, and some unusual fads that swept the nation. 

CLICK HERE to open Part 2.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Economy of the "Roaring Twenties":

In this interactive tutorial, learn about the economy of the 1920s, a decade often called the "Roaring Twenties."  You'll explore consumerism, advertising, the auto industry, and the stock market, as well as how the 1920s boom contributed to the Great Depression.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Postwar Blues...and Reds:

In this interactive tutorial, learn about the years immediately following World War I: 1919 and 1920.  These were dangerous years of economic depression, racial violence, and anti-immigrant nativism in the United States.  You'll learn about the Red Scare, the Palmer Raids, Sacco and Vanzetti, and the rise of the Ku Klux Klan.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Assessments

Quiz: America in the 1920s:

Test your knowledge of the "Roaring Twenties" with a 9-question multiple choice quiz provided by Khan Academy. Good luck!

Type: Assessment

Quiz: The Great Depression:

Test your knowledge of the Great Depression and the New Deal with this 15-question multiple choice quiz provided by Khan Academy. Good luck!

Type: Assessment

Text Resource

Supreme Court Landmark Case: Schechter v. U.S. (1935):

Learn more about the 1935 landmark Supreme Court decision Schechter v.U.S. In this Depression-era case, the Court ruled against one of the key parts of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal: the National Industrial Recovery Act (NIRA). Issues of economics, capitalism, and government power were all at stake.

Type: Text Resource

Tutorials

FDR's First 100 Days & the New Deal:

Learn about President Franklin D. Roosevelt's New Deal legislation that transformed the American government during the Great Depression. This short video describes several programs of the New Deal including the Tennessee Valley Authority (TVA), the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), and the National Recovery Administration (NRA).

Type: Tutorial

Franklin Roosevelt & the New Deal:

Learn about President Franklin D. Roosevelt's efforts to stimulate the economy and combat unemployment during the Great Depression. This short video describes several programs from Roosevelt's New Deal including the National Youth Administration, the Rural Electrification Administration, and the Works Progress Administration.

Type: Tutorial

Examining the Life & Work of Eleanor Roosevelt:

In a series of short videos, learn about the life and work of Eleanor Roosevelt, wife of the 32nd president and niece of the 26th president. The first video details Eleanor's lonely childhood, the second describes her first involvement in American politics and public speaking, the third examines her work with organizations like the Red Cross and the League of Women Voters, and the fourth explains her role working with the United Nations and leading the committee that drafted the Universal Declaration of Human Rights in 1948. This pivotal document changed the way the world viewed the rights of people. Watch one video or enjoy them all!

Type: Tutorial

60-Second Presidents: Calvin Coolidge:

View a brief, funny video about the 30th President, Calvin Coolidge, who presided over an era of economic expansion during the "Roaring Twenties!"

Type: Tutorial

60-Second Presidents: Warren Harding:

View a short, funny video about the 29th President, Warren G. Harding, the first president of the 1920s, who offered Americans "a return to normalcy" after World War I!

Type: Tutorial

60-Second Presidents: Herbert Hoover:

View a brief, funny video about our 31st President, Herbert Hoover, a president known as a great organizer but a terrible politician.

Type: Tutorial

60-Second Presidents: Franklin D. Roosevelt:

View a brief, funny video about the 32nd President, Franklin D. Roosevelt, a man who ushered the U.S. out of the Great Depression and into World War II. Enjoy this quick trip through American history!

Type: Tutorial

Safe for Democracy:

In this webisode brought to you by PBS, you will explore key events that took place in American history from 1903-1927. Topics include the Wright Brothers, World War I, women's suffrage, Prohibition, jazz, Hollywood in the 1920s, and Charles Lindbergh. In this resource you can examine primary source documents and photographs, a timeline and glossary, take a quiz, and explore additional resources. Enjoy this journey into American history!

Type: Tutorial

Depression and War:

In this webisode brought to you by PBS, you will explore key events that took place leading up to and during the Great Depression and World War II. You can explore primary source documents and photographs, a timeline and a glossary, take a quiz, and investigate additional resources to learn more about these eras. Enjoy this journey into American history!

Type: Tutorial

The Civilian Conservation Corps:

In this tutorial, you will view a brief video about the purpose and function of the Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC). The CCC was created by President Roosevelt through the New Deal program to promote economic growth and create jobs across the nation during the Great Depression.

Type: Tutorial

Crash Course U.S. History: The New Deal:

In this tutorial video, you will take a whirlwind journey through the New Deal, which was Franklin D. Roosevelt's plan to pull the United States out of the Great Depression of the 1930s. The New Deal consisted of a series of programs that were designed to provide relief, recovery, and/or reform. The video briefly describes a number of the New Deal programs, including the Social Security Act, the Public Works Administration, the Works Progress Administration, and the Agricultural Adjustment Act. The video also describes how the New Deal forever changed the relationship between the government and citizens of the United States. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. History!

Type: Tutorial

Crash Course U.S. History: The Great Depression:

In this tutorial video, you will take a whirlwind journey through the events that led up to the Great Depression. The video explores the possible causes of the Great Depression, including the economic, social and political changes that may have contributed to this financial crisis. The video also examines what took place after the Great Depression began, including the failure of many banks and massive unemployment across the nation. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. History!

Type: Tutorial

Crash Course U.S. History: The Roaring Twenties:

In this tutorial video, you will take a whirlwind journey through the glitz and glam that personifies the Roaring Twenties Era. In the decade known for its numerous social changes, you'll learn about the popularity of the automobile, the rise of Hollywood and celebrity culture, flappers, the economy, limits on immigration, the Scopes Trial, and much more. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. History.

Type: Tutorial

Crash Course U.S. History: The Progressive Era:

In this tutorial video, you'll take a whirlwind journey through the Progressive Era in American history. During this time, people were attempting to solve governmental and societal issues, all while trying to better implement equality for all. Enjoy this "crash course" in U.S. history!

Type: Tutorial

Video/Audio/Animations

How to Read a Document, Part 2: Analyzing FDR's Inaugural Address:

 

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

How to Read a Document, Part 1: Source Identification:

Learn how to "think like a historian" in this brief video from Khan Academy. Your hosts explain the difference between primary and secondary sources and analyze the beginning of President Franklin D. Roosevelt's First Inaugural Address.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this topic.