Standard 4: Demonstrate an understanding of the domestic and international causes, course, and consequences of westward expansion.

General Information
Number: SS.8.A.4
Title: Demonstrate an understanding of the domestic and international causes, course, and consequences of westward expansion.
Type: Standard
Subject: Social Studies
Grade: 8
Strand: American History

Related Benchmarks

This cluster includes the following benchmarks.

Related Access Points

This cluster includes the following access points.

Independent

SS.8.A.4.In.a
Identify major events and consequences of America’s westward expansion, such as the War of 1812, the acquisition of Florida, the Trail of Tears, and the California Gold Rush.
SS.8.A.4.In.b
Identify reasons why people supported or opposed slavery in the western territories and Florida.
SS.8.A.4.In.c
Identify the roles of individuals and groups during westward expansion, such as Lewis and Clark, Sacajawea, Native Americans, slaves, and Chinese immigrants.
SS.8.A.4.In.d
Identify the roles of individuals and groups during westward expansion, such as Lewis and Clark, Sacajawea, Native Americans, slaves, and Chinese immigrants.
SS.8.A.4.In.e
Identify how transportation changed America’s economy in the 1800s.
SS.8.A.4.In.f
Recognize technological improvements in industry, such as Eli Whitney and the cotton gin, Robert Fulton and the steam engine, and Francis Cabot Lowell and the mechanized cotton mill.
SS.8.A.4.In.g
Identify working conditions in textile mills in New England as they affected women and children.
SS.8.A.4.In.h
Identify the influence of individuals on social and political developments, such as Thomas Jefferson—westward expansion, Frederick Douglass—the abolitionist movement, Dorothea Dix—social reforms, and Susan B. Anthony—women's rights.
SS.8.A.4.In.i
Identify the influence of individuals on social and political developments, such as Thomas Jefferson—westward expansion, Frederick Douglass—the abolitionist movement, Dorothea Dix—social reforms, and Susan B. Anthony—women's rights.
SS.8.A.4.In.j
Recognize technological improvements in industry, such as Eli Whitney and the cotton gin, Robert Fulton and the steam engine, and Francis Cabot Lowell and the mechanized cotton mill.
SS.8.A.4.In.k
Identify characteristics of slave life on plantations, including resistance efforts.
SS.8.A.4.In.l
Identify an effect of the Haitian Revolution, such as forcing the French to give up the Louisiana Territory to the United States.
SS.8.A.4.In.m
Identify a consequence of landmark Supreme Court cases during the westward expansion, such as that Native American tribes came under federal jurisdiction and were subsequently forced from their land.
SS.8.A.4.In.n
Identify the major causes, events, and consequences of the women’s suffrage movement.
SS.8.A.4.In.o
Identify literature that supported social reform in the era of westward expansion.
SS.8.A.4.In.p
Recognize influences of Jacksonian democracy, such as an expansion of voting rights, the spoils system, a strong federal government, and the Indian Removal Act.
SS.8.A.4.In.q
Identify impacts that Florida had on the era of the westward expansion, such as relations with Seminoles and runaway slaves, and the establishment of Florida as a territory and admittance as a state.
SS.8.A.4.In.r
Identify impacts that Florida had on the era of the westward expansion, such as relations with Seminoles and runaway slaves, and the establishment of Florida as a territory and admittance as a state.

Supported

SS.8.A.4.Su.a
Recognize major events and consequences of America’s westward expansion, such as the acquisition of Florida, the Trail of Tears, and the California Gold Rush.
SS.8.A.4.Su.b
Recognize why people supported or opposed slavery in the western territories and Florida.
SS.8.A.4.Su.c
Recognize the role of an individual or group during westward expansion, such as Lewis and Clark, Sacajawea, Native Americans, slaves, or Chinese immigrants.
SS.8.A.4.Su.d
Recognize the role of an individual or group during westward expansion, such as Lewis and Clark, Sacajawea, Native Americans, slaves, or Chinese immigrants.
SS.8.A.4.Su.e
Recognize how transportation changed America’s economy in the 1800s.
SS.8.A.4.Su.f
Recognize a technological improvement in industry, such as Eli Whitney and the cotton gin.
SS.8.A.4.Su.g
Recognize working conditions in textile mills in New England in the 1800s.
SS.8.A.4.Su.h
Recognize the influence of individuals on social and political developments, such as Thomas Jefferson—westward expansion, Frederick Douglass—the abolitionist movement, Dorothea Dix—social reforms, and Susan B. Anthony—women's rights.
SS.8.A.4.Su.i
Recognize the influence of individuals on social and political developments, such as Thomas Jefferson—westward expansion, Frederick Douglass—the abolitionist movement, Dorothea Dix—social reforms, and Susan B. Anthony—women's rights.
SS.8.A.4.Su.j
Recognize a technological improvement in industry, such as Eli Whitney and the cotton gin.
SS.8.A.4.Su.k
Recognize characteristics of slave life on plantations.
SS.8.A.4.Su.l
Recognize an effect of the Haitian Revolution, such as forcing the French to give up the Louisiana Territory to the United States.
SS.8.A.4.Su.m
Recognize a consequence of landmark Supreme Court cases during the westward expansion, such as the forced removal of Native Americans from their lands.
SS.8.A.4.Su.n
Recognize the major cause and consequences of the women’s suffrage movement.
SS.8.A.4.Su.o
Recognize stories and poems written to support social reform in the era of westward expansion.
SS.8.A.4.Su.p
Recognize a key idea of Jacksonian democracy, such as an expansion of voting rights, the spoils system, a strong federal government, or the Indian Removal Act.
SS.8.A.4.Su.q
Recognize an impact that Florida had on the era of the westward expansion, such as relations with Seminoles and runaway slaves, or the establishment of Florida as a territory and admittance as a state.
SS.8.A.4.Su.r
Recognize an impact that Florida had on the era of the westward expansion, such as relations with Seminoles and runaway slaves, or the establishment of Florida as a territory and admittance as a state.

Participatory

SS.8.A.4.Pa.a
Recognize a consequence of America’s westward expansion.
SS.8.A.4.Pa.b
Recognize that groups did not agree about slavery.
SS.8.A.4.Pa.c
Recognize a consequence of America’s westward expansion.
SS.8.A.4.Pa.d
Recognize a consequence of America’s westward expansion.
SS.8.A.4.Pa.e
Recognize an effect of transportation.
SS.8.A.4.Pa.f
Recognize the benefit of an invention.
SS.8.A.4.Pa.g
Recognize a characteristic of poor working conditions.
SS.8.A.4.Pa.h
Recognize a social justice issue.
SS.8.A.4.Pa.i
Recognize a social justice issue.
SS.8.A.4.Pa.j
Recognize the benefit of an invention.
SS.8.A.4.Pa.k
Recognize a characteristic of slave life on a plantation.
SS.8.A.4.Pa.l
Recognize an unintended effect of a revolution.
SS.8.A.4.Pa.m
Recognize a social justice issue.
SS.8.A.4.Pa.n
Recognize that women can vote.
SS.8.A.4.Pa.o
Recognize that stories tell about the era of westward expansion.
SS.8.A.4.Pa.p
Recognize that new leaders bring change to the government.
SS.8.A.4.Pa.q
Recognize that Florida became a state.
SS.8.A.4.Pa.r
Recognize a contribution of a key group to Florida’s culture.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this topic.

Lesson Plans

The Lewis and Clark Expedition:

In this lesson, students will analyze the challenges faced by the Lewis and Clark Expedition, also known as the Corps of Discovery Expedition, and the effect the journey had on American history and Native American cultures.

Type: Lesson Plan

Close Reading Exemplar: Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass:

The goal of this two to three day exemplar is to give students the opportunity to explore the point of view of a man who survived slavery. By reading and rereading the passage closely, combined with classroom discussion about it, students will explore the various beliefs and points of view Douglass experienced as he became increasingly aware of the unfairness of his life. Students will need to consider the emotional context of words and how diction (word choice) affects an author's message. When combined with writing about the passage and teacher feedback, students will form a deeper understanding of how slavery affected those involved.

Type: Lesson Plan

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Parent Resources

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