Standard 1: Demonstrate an understanding of the origins and purposes of government, law, and the American political system.

General Information
Number: SS.7.C.1
Title: Demonstrate an understanding of the origins and purposes of government, law, and the American political system.
Type: Standard
Subject: Social Studies
Grade: 7
Strand: Civics and Government

Related Benchmarks

This cluster includes the following benchmarks.

Related Access Points

This cluster includes the following access points.

Independent

SS.7.C.1.In.a
Recognize that ideas of separation of powers and natural rights influenced the authors of the United States Constitution.
SS.7.C.1.In.b
Recognize influences on the colonists’ view of government, such as the Magna Carta, the Mayflower Compact, and Thomas Paine’s “Common Sense.”
SS.7.C.1.In.c
Identify concerns of the American colonists that led to the writing of the Declaration of Independence, such as taxation and laws of England.
SS.7.C.1.In.d
Identify complaints described in the Declaration of Independence, such as stationing soldiers in people’s homes, taxes, and cutting off trade with other countries.
SS.7.C.1.In.e
Identify a weakness of the Articles of Confederation that led to the writing of the Constitution, such as no president, a weak central government, and each state had its own money system.
SS.7.C.1.In.f
Identify the reasons for establishing a government listed in the Preamble of the United States Constitution.
SS.7.C.1.In.g
Identify examples of separation of powers in the Constitution, such as the three branches of government.
SS.7.C.1.In.h
Identify an argument for and against the inclusion of a bill of rights in the Constitution.
SS.7.C.1.In.i
Identify how the rule of law is used in American government, such as people must follow the laws of the government.

Supported

SS.7.C.1.Su.a
Recognize the United States Constitution was based on ideas from the past.
SS.7.C.1.Su.b
Recognize an influence on the colonists’ view of government, such as the Mayflower Compact.
SS.7.C.1.Su.c
Recognize that American colonists were unhappy with the way England was treating them and this led to the writing of the Declaration of Independence.
SS.7.C.1.Su.d
Recognize a complaint described in the Declaration of Independence, such as stationing soldiers in people’s homes, taxes, or cutting off trade with other countries.
SS.7.C.1.Su.e
Recognize that the Articles of Confederation had weaknesses and the Constitution replaced it.
SS.7.C.1.Su.f
Recognize that the Preamble of the United States Constitution states the reasons the government was created.
SS.7.C.1.Su.g
Recognize the powers of the branches of government of the United States.
SS.7.C.1.Su.h
Recognize a reason for inclusion of a bill of rights in the Constitution, such as the Bill of Rights is for all states.
SS.7.C.1.Su.i
Recognize that people must follow the laws of American government.

Participatory

SS.7.C.1.Pa.a
Recognize that ideas of people influence others.
SS.7.C.1.Pa.b
Recognize that ideas of people influence others.
SS.7.C.1.Pa.c
Recognize people in the American colonies were unhappy with the way England was treating them.
SS.7.C.1.Pa.d
Recognize people in the American colonies were unhappy with the way England was treating them.
SS.7.C.1.Pa.e
Recognize that government can be changed.
SS.7.C.1.Pa.f
Recognize a reason for government.
SS.7.C.1.Pa.g
Recognize that the government has different parts.
SS.7.C.1.Pa.h
Recognize that both individuals and groups have rights.
SS.7.C.1.Pa.i
Recognize that people must follow laws of government.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this topic.

Lesson Plan

How English policies and responses to colonial concerns led to the writing of the Declaration of Independence:

In this lesson from the Florida Joint Center for Citizenship (FJCC) students learn how English policies and responses to colonial concerns led to the writing of the Declaration of Independence. Learning goals are based on the benchmark clarifications for SS.7.C.1.3.

  • Students will trace the causal relationships between English/British policies, English responses to colonial grievances, and the writing of the Declaration of Independence.
  •  Students will recognize the underlying themes of English colonial policies concerning taxation, representation, and individual rights that formed the basis of the American colonists’ desire for independence. 

This resource includes a lesson plan, a “Civics on Demand” video for teachers that provides an introduction to SS.7.C.1.3, FJCC created civics assessment items and additional resources

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorials

All About Impeachment: Part 2:

In Part 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the impeachment process detailed in the U.S. Constitution, including what it is, who can be impeached, why someone would be impeached, and some famous examples of impeachment in action.   

This is Part 2 in a two-part series. Click HERE to open Part 1.

 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

All About Impeachment: Part 1:

In Part 1 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the impeachment process detailed in the U.S. Constitution, including what it is, who can be impeached, why someone would be impeached, and a bit about the process.  

 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Judicial Review: Brought to You by Marbury v. Madison:

In this interactive tutorial, learn about the famous Supreme Court case Marbury v. Madison, which established the principle of judicial review.  You'll examine the details of the case and its important legacy in American history.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Federal Government: The Three Branches in Action :

In this interactive tutorial, you'll examine the powers and workings of the three branches of our federal government.  You'll learn what Congress, the President, and the Supreme Court really do.  Enjoy!

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Understanding Rule of Law:

In this interactive tutorial, learn about one of the most important principles in American democracy: rule of law.  You'll explore this important concept and learn about its application to a famous Supreme Court decision: United States v. Nixon.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Three Branches: Check Yourself!:

In this interactive tutorial, explore the three branches of the U.S. federal government with a special emphasis on the checks and balances that allow our government to achieve a proper separation of powers.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Great Debate: Federalists vs. Anti-Federalists:

In this interactive tutorial, you'll compare the viewpoints of the two groups on opposite sides of the great debate over ratifying the U.S. Constitution: Federalists and Anti-Federalists.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Britain vs. America: What Led to the Declaration of Independence:

In this interactive tutorial, learn why Great Britain and her 13 American colonies split between 1763 and 1776.  At the end of this time span, Britain and America were at war, and the Declaration of Independence had announced the United States of America as a brand new nation, no longer colonies of Britain.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing the Declaration of Independence :

In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn how to analyze the ideas, grievances (complaints), and language found in the Declaration of Independence, one of the most important documents in the history of the United States.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Understanding the Preamble :

Analyze the Preamble to the U.S. Constitution -- line by line, word by word -- in this interactive tutorial!

Type: Original Student Tutorial

From Confederation to Constitution:

Learn about the Articles of Confederation, our nation’s first written constitution, in this interactive tutorial.  You'll identify its major weaknesses and their consequences and explain the reasons why America's Founders replaced the Articles of Confederation with the government we still use today, the U.S. Constitution.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Three Branches of Government:

In this interactive tutorial, learn how to identify the three branches of the federal government as established by the Constitution of the United States.  You will also learn to identify the structure and function of each branch of government. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Enlightenment Ideas and the Founders:

Learn how Enlightenment ideas like separation of powers, natural law, and the social contract influenced the Founders and their design of the United States government in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Colonists: What Were They Thinking?:

Learn how several famous documents influenced the views of American colonists when they sought their independence from Great Britain and formed their own government. In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn about the Magna Carta, the English Bill of Rights, the Mayflower Compact, and Thomas Paine’s Common Sense.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How Are Laws Made?:

In this interactive tutorial, learn how a bill becomes a law. You will see how bills (ideas for laws) are passed by Congress and signed into law by the president, and you'll learn how all three branches of government play a role in determining the laws of our land.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Tutorial

The Birth of the U.S. Constitution:

Learn about the birth of the U.S. Constitution in this tutorial video by Khan Academy and the Aspen Institute. You'll learn why the Constitution was needed and what its famous Preamble means. Referred to as a "bundle of compromises," the Constitution sought to create a government based on separation of powers and checks and balances.

Type: Tutorial

Video/Audio/Animation

A More Perfect Union: George Washington and the Making of the Constitution:

This 3-part video from Mount Vernon details the struggles that led delegates from the 13 colonies to hold a Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia in 1787. At this convention, under the leadership of George Washington, the delegates rejected the Articles of Confederation in favor of a new, stronger federal government. After the Constitution's ratification, Washington become the new nation's first president.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this topic.

Original Student Tutorials

All About Impeachment: Part 2:

In Part 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the impeachment process detailed in the U.S. Constitution, including what it is, who can be impeached, why someone would be impeached, and some famous examples of impeachment in action.   

This is Part 2 in a two-part series. Click HERE to open Part 1.

 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

All About Impeachment: Part 1:

In Part 1 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the impeachment process detailed in the U.S. Constitution, including what it is, who can be impeached, why someone would be impeached, and a bit about the process.  

 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Judicial Review: Brought to You by Marbury v. Madison:

In this interactive tutorial, learn about the famous Supreme Court case Marbury v. Madison, which established the principle of judicial review.  You'll examine the details of the case and its important legacy in American history.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Federal Government: The Three Branches in Action :

In this interactive tutorial, you'll examine the powers and workings of the three branches of our federal government.  You'll learn what Congress, the President, and the Supreme Court really do.  Enjoy!

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Understanding Rule of Law:

In this interactive tutorial, learn about one of the most important principles in American democracy: rule of law.  You'll explore this important concept and learn about its application to a famous Supreme Court decision: United States v. Nixon.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Three Branches: Check Yourself!:

In this interactive tutorial, explore the three branches of the U.S. federal government with a special emphasis on the checks and balances that allow our government to achieve a proper separation of powers.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Great Debate: Federalists vs. Anti-Federalists:

In this interactive tutorial, you'll compare the viewpoints of the two groups on opposite sides of the great debate over ratifying the U.S. Constitution: Federalists and Anti-Federalists.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Britain vs. America: What Led to the Declaration of Independence:

In this interactive tutorial, learn why Great Britain and her 13 American colonies split between 1763 and 1776.  At the end of this time span, Britain and America were at war, and the Declaration of Independence had announced the United States of America as a brand new nation, no longer colonies of Britain.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Analyzing the Declaration of Independence :

In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn how to analyze the ideas, grievances (complaints), and language found in the Declaration of Independence, one of the most important documents in the history of the United States.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Understanding the Preamble :

Analyze the Preamble to the U.S. Constitution -- line by line, word by word -- in this interactive tutorial!

Type: Original Student Tutorial

From Confederation to Constitution:

Learn about the Articles of Confederation, our nation’s first written constitution, in this interactive tutorial.  You'll identify its major weaknesses and their consequences and explain the reasons why America's Founders replaced the Articles of Confederation with the government we still use today, the U.S. Constitution.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Three Branches of Government:

In this interactive tutorial, learn how to identify the three branches of the federal government as established by the Constitution of the United States.  You will also learn to identify the structure and function of each branch of government. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Enlightenment Ideas and the Founders:

Learn how Enlightenment ideas like separation of powers, natural law, and the social contract influenced the Founders and their design of the United States government in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Colonists: What Were They Thinking?:

Learn how several famous documents influenced the views of American colonists when they sought their independence from Great Britain and formed their own government. In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn about the Magna Carta, the English Bill of Rights, the Mayflower Compact, and Thomas Paine’s Common Sense.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How Are Laws Made?:

In this interactive tutorial, learn how a bill becomes a law. You will see how bills (ideas for laws) are passed by Congress and signed into law by the president, and you'll learn how all three branches of government play a role in determining the laws of our land.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Tutorial

The Birth of the U.S. Constitution:

Learn about the birth of the U.S. Constitution in this tutorial video by Khan Academy and the Aspen Institute. You'll learn why the Constitution was needed and what its famous Preamble means. Referred to as a "bundle of compromises," the Constitution sought to create a government based on separation of powers and checks and balances.

Type: Tutorial

Video/Audio/Animation

A More Perfect Union: George Washington and the Making of the Constitution:

This 3-part video from Mount Vernon details the struggles that led delegates from the 13 colonies to hold a Constitutional Convention in Philadelphia in 1787. At this convention, under the leadership of George Washington, the delegates rejected the Articles of Confederation in favor of a new, stronger federal government. After the Constitution's ratification, Washington become the new nation's first president.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this topic.