Standard 3: Demonstrate an understanding of the principles, functions and organization of government.

General Information
Number: SS.7.CG.3
Title: Demonstrate an understanding of the principles, functions and organization of government.
Type: Standard
Subject: Social Studies
Grade: 7
Strand: Civics and Government (Starting 2023-2024)

Related Benchmarks

This cluster includes the following benchmarks.

Related Access Points

This cluster includes the following access points.

Access Points

SS.7.CG.3.AP.1
Identify an advantage of a constitutional republic, like the United States, over other forms of government.
SS.7.CG.3.AP.2
Identify an advantage of a federal system of government for balancing local, state, and national government powers.
SS.7.CG.3.AP.3
Identify the structure and function of the three branches of government established in the U.S. Constitution.
SS.7.CG.3.AP.4
Identify the relationship between state and national governments as established in the U.S. Constitution and the 10th Amendment.
SS.7.CG.3.AP.5
Identify the steps in the amendment process of the U.S. Constitution.
SS.7.CG.3.AP.6
Identify how the 13th, 14th, 15th, 19th, 24th and 26th Amendments broadened participation in the political process.
SS.7.CG.3.AP.7
Identify the structure and functions of the legislative branch of government.
SS.7.CG.3.AP.8
Identify the structure and functions of the executive branch of government.
SS.7.CG.3.AP.9
Identify the structure and functions of the judicial branch of government.
SS.7.CG.3.AP.10
Identify sources and types of law.
SS.7.CG.3.AP.11
Identify the effects of landmark Supreme Court decisions.
SS.7.CG.3.AP.12
Identify the framework of government in the U.S. and Florida constitutions.
SS.7.CG.3.AP.13
Identify government services provided to citizens at the local, state, and national levels.
SS.7.CG.3.AP.14
Identify the purpose and function of the Electoral College in electing the President of the United States.
SS.7.CG.3.AP.15
Identify the advantages of capitalism over socialism and communism in regard to economic freedom.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this topic.

Lesson Plans

The Watergate Effect part 3:

Students will create a circle graph to display categorical data of the public presidential approval rates after the Supreme Court Case United States v. Nixon. Students will graph results independently and compare them to the circle graphs created during the Watergate Effect Part 1 Lesson (Resource ID#: 208926) and the Watergate Effect Part 2 Lesson (Resource ID#: 210122) to discuss the trend of the data over the entirety of the Supreme Court case.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Watergate Effect part 2:

Students will create a circle graph to display categorical data of the public presidential approval rates during the Supreme Court Case United States v. Nixon. Students will graph results in pairs/groups and compare them to the circle graph created during the Watergate Effect Part 1 Lesson (Resource ID#: 208926).

Type: Lesson Plan

3 Branches of US Government Scratch: Lesson 3:

This is part 3 of a  3 lesson unit about the roles and responsibilities of the 3 branches of the U.S. government. Students will create code for their own Scratch program that informs others about the 3 branches of the U.S. government.

Type: Lesson Plan

3 Branches of Government Anchor Chart & Scratch Module: Lesson 1 :

This is part 1 of a 3 part integrated coding unit.

Students will interact with a Scratch program module about the 3 branches of government.  They will examine the code and create an anchor chart on the branches of the government. 

 

Type: Lesson Plan

Branches of Government Graphic Organizer: Lesson 2:

Students will research the given websites to complete a graphic organizer (attached) to identify the roles and responsibilities of each of the 3 Branches of the US Government as they are described in Articles I, II and III. This is Lesson 2 in a three lesson unit integrating civics and computer science.

Type: Lesson Plan

Coding The Three Branches, Part 3:

Students will work in groups to assess their knowledge of the three branches of government using a scratch program. Classmates will provide feedback using a rubric and students will write a self-reflection based on the feedback. This is Lesson 3 of 3 in an integrated civics and computer science mini-unit.  

Type: Lesson Plan

Coding The Three Branches, Part 2:

Students will create code that will assess knowledge of the three branches of government. Flowchart information will be converted into scratch coding using if-then statements. This is Lesson 2 in a three-lesson unit integrating civics and coding. 

Type: Lesson Plan

The Supreme Court, Keeping the Constitution Relevant- Lesson 2:

This is the second lesson in a 3-lesson unit. Students will conduct online research about landmark Supreme Court Cases, examine the verdict, analyze the precedent set for each, and the impact those precedents have had on society.  This is part 2 of 3 of an integrated computer science and civics mini-unit.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Supreme Court, Keeping the Constitution Relevant- Lesson 1:

Students will examine the purpose of the Supreme Court, the impact their precedents have, and explain the possible consequences of the inappropriate use of social media. This is the first lesson in a 3-part integrated computer science and civics mini-unit. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Forms of Government Meme:

This is Lesson 1 in a unit integrating Spanish, coding and civics. Students will organize ideas, speak and write about democracy, dictatorship and monarchy, then apply the knowledge and relate it to other words learned about family and school in order to design and create an original meme in Scratch.

Type: Lesson Plan

Coding the Three Branches, Part 1:

Students will research the three branches of government and create a question and answer flowchart about them. The preparation of the flowchart will be used when coding with Scratch in the next lessons. This is lesson 1 of 3 in an integrated civics and computer science mini-unit.

Type: Lesson Plan

Create a Circle Graph to Represent Percentages:

Students will compare each region's percentage of seats in the U.S. House of Representatives to other regions and the whole. Students will calculate central angle degrees and create a circle graph to represent the percentages. The civics standard will be the real-world example used to apply the concept of displaying data to the Legislative Branch of government in this integrated lesson plan. 

 

Type: Lesson Plan

Generating Equivalent Forms of Numbers Using the Legislative Branch of the Government:

Students will rewrite fractions, decimals, and percentages in equivalent forms to compare the number of seats that each state has in the U.S. House of Representatives to the total number of seats in the House of Representatives, in this integrated lesson plan.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: Frederick Douglass and the 15th Amendment:

Students will read portions of The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass and review the text of the 15th Amendment, then write a narrative piece in the form of a journal entry to express Frederick Douglass’ thoughts and feelings about how the 15th Amendment could impact his life.

There are three lessons that can be used to complement a study of The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass and help students take a new perspective by merging ELA skills with civics knowledge.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Forms of Government Video Game:

Students will apply the principles and characteristics of dictatorship, democracy, or monarchy. They will create a video game in Scratch (Spanish version) on forms of government, enhancing their knowledge of basic programming concepts, development of design and creativity skills, problem-solving, teamwork, critical thinking, and the acquisition of technical knowledge.

Type: Lesson Plan

Using Conditionals to Determine Types of Government- Lesson 3:

This is the final lesson in a 3-lesson unit. In this integrated civics lesson, students will learn about conditional logic through an unplugged activity and complete the Scratch code for a game that uses conditional statements to determine what form of government the user is thinking of.

Type: Lesson Plan

Using Conditionals to Determine Types of Government- Lesson 2:

This is lesson 2 in a 3-lesson unit that culminates in a Scratch project. The students conducted research on types of government during the previous lesson. In this lesson, students will review the traits of different forms of government by flowcharting using programming logic in this integrated lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Democracy at Work: Federal, State, and Local Elections - Federal Elections:

In this lesson plan, students will learn about electing officials (President, U.S. Senators & Representatives), their roles, equal/proportional representation in Congress, and the purpose and function of the Electoral College.

Type: Lesson Plan

Using Conditionals to Determine Types of Government- Lesson 1:

This is the first lesson in a 3-lesson unit plan. In this lesson, students will research different forms of government, describe their traits, identify a famous example of each, and explain why a constitutional representative democracy is most advantageous to our country in this integrated lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass:The Early Life of Frederick Douglass:

After rereading chapters 1-3 from the text, The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass and the 13th-15th Amendments, students will better understand Civil Rights and the author’s choice of words to use throughout the text to make a point. Students can identify and explain examples within the text where Douglass uses diction and syntax to establish and achieve his purpose.

There are three lessons that can be used to complement a study of The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass and take a new perspective by merging ELA skills with civics knowledge.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass: Frederick Douglass and the 14th Amendment:

After rereading chapters 4-6 of The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass, students will determine the meaning of the term citizen based on their background knowledge and the 14th Amendment. Students will read and annotate the 14th Amendment text. Students will then compare how the U.S. Constitution defined citizenship to the way enslaved people were treated by analyzing Frederick Douglass’ words and phrases in chapters 4-6 of his narrative.

There are lessons that can be used to complement a study of The Narrative of the Life of Frederick Douglass and help students take a new perspective by merging ELA skills with civics knowledge.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Spain and Latin American Governments Flowchart:

This is lesson 2 in a Spanish, civics and coding integrated unit.  Students will reinforce their knowledge about flowcharts and identify the symbols used to represent algorithms in flowcharts (oval, rectangle, diamond, and arrow). They will research and organize relevant information to write short phrases in Spanish. Students will use symbols to make a flowchart that identifies the type of government of Spain and Latin American countries.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

Amendments That Changed America Part 2: Research:

Students will work in teams to research amendments 13, 14, 15,19, 24 and 26. They will complete a research notes page describing how each has expanded civil rights, the impact on American society, and how each amendment increased participation in the political process.  This is the 2nd lesson in a 3-part unit. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Amendments That Changed America Part 3: Simulation:

Students will use Scratch to create their own program explaining the following amendments: 13, 14, 15, 19, 24, or 26. Students will discuss the importance of these amendments and the impacts they have had on society, civic involvement, and increased participation in the political process. This is lesson 3 of a 3-part unit on Amendments 13, 14, 15, 19, 24 and 26.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

Percent of Change and the House of Representatives Lesson 3 of 3:

Students will analyze the 2020 United States Census to study how the population changes the number of representatives in each state. They will compare the highest populated and least populated states based on the data in this integrated lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Percent of Change and the House of Representatives Lesson 2 of 3:

Students will use ratios to explore the percent of a state's population that is represented by each of its designated seats in the U.S. House of Representatives.  They will analyze the 2020 United States Census to study how the population changes the number of representatives from each state. Students will compare the highest populated and least populated states based on the data in this integrated lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Amendments That Changed America Part 1: Investigate:

Students will watch a sample model created on Scratch and will discuss the amendments that changed America.  The amendments discussed in this unit are 13, 14, 15, 19, 24, and 26. Discussion questions and assessment questions for students are included.  This is lesson 1 of a 3 lesson Unit. 

 

 

Type: Lesson Plan

Make it a Law - Lesson 3:

Students will use Scratch, a block programming software to create an animation about how a bill becomes law. Students will use their flowchart from the previous lesson to guide their choice of code. This is the final lesson in a 3-part integrated civics and computer science mini-unit.

Type: Lesson Plan

Make it a Law - Lesson 1:

Students participate in a simulation of the process a bill goes through to become law by role-playing. They evaluate the logical flow of this process through the role-play activity and discuss its application to programming.  This is the first lesson in a 3-part integrated civics and computer science mini-unit. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Make it Law - Lesson 2:

Students learn the purpose of different flowchart shapes and prepare a flowchart that models the process a bill goes through to become law. This lesson is in preparation for creating a scratch program for how a bill becomes law. This is lesson two in a 3-part integrated civics and computer science mini-unit.

Type: Lesson Plan

Who's in the House? Part 3:

Students will use percentages and states' apportionment of representatives in the House to determine how much funding should be allocated to each state, in this integrated lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Modernized Portraits of Women's Suffragists:

Students will plan, sketch, and create a modernized portrait of a member of the Women’s Suffrage Movement. They will be combining their knowledge of the historical figures and the passing of the 19th amendment with the artistic process of portraiture in this integrated lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Errors in Code: The Three Branches of US Government - Part 3:

Students will create a Scratch program about the three branches of government using work from previous lessons (Resources #208945 and #208958). Students will be required to include multiple Sprites, motion block, control block, looks block, conditional statement using the control block, sound block, and the use of an extension. This is the final lesson in a 3-part series that integrates civics with computer science.

Type: Lesson Plan

Errors in code: the three Branches of Government Part 2:

Students will debug a Scratch program on the three branches of government where the roles/responsibilities are incorrectly matched. Student(s) will design a storyboard to create their own Scratch program to prepare for the next lesson. This is the second lesson in a 3-part integrated civics and computer science mini-unit.

Type: Lesson Plan

Errors in Code: The Three Branches of US Government - Part 1:

Students will research the three branches of government and analyze the importance of each branch’s responsibility. Students will also complete an unplugged evaluation of the logical flow of a step-by-step Scratch program by cutting up and rearranging printed code. This is the first lesson in a three-part integrated civics and computer science mini-unit.

Type: Lesson Plan

Who's in the House? Part 2:

Use data from U.S. Census Bureau that shows Apportionment Population, Resident Population, and Overseas Population for 2020 & 2010 Census to create and compare ratios in this integrated lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Landmark Supreme Court Cases Wrap It Up Part 3:

This is lesson 3 of 3 in a mini-unit integrating civics and 7th Grade ELA. In this lesson, students will be continuing to review 9 Landmark Supreme Court cases with an opening activity requiring the students to examine the court cases and pick out key academic vocabulary. At this point, students should be ready for a final review which is a matching game. Students will match the court cases, amendments, and key academic vocabulary terms to their descriptions or definitions. This activity can be played multiple times to ensure mastery of the standards.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Watergate Effect Part 1:

Students will create a circle graph to display categorical data of the public presidential approval rates of Richard Nixon before the Supreme Court Case United States v. Nixon. Students will calculate percentages and central angle degrees to graph results in pairs/groups and analyze the results in this integrated lesson plan.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

Budgeting and Decision-Making: Integrating Math and Civics:

This lesson will help students understand the concept of percentages within the context of government budgets. Students will explore how percentages are used to allocate funds in government budgets and how they can be effectively communicated using graphs. The lesson will involve collaborative learning, discussions, and problem-solving to foster critical thinking and application of math concepts in a civics context.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

Exploring the Electoral College :

Students will research the Electoral College and learn about elections where a candidate who won the popular vote did not win the presidential election.  Students will examine the value of the Electoral College and its history. This is the first lesson in a 3-part integrated civics and computer science mini-unit.

Type: Lesson Plan

Legislative Representation Lesson 3:

This lesson uses percentages and ratios to calculate percent increase in the number of female U.S. Senators from 1989-2025.  Students will use two different methods to calculate these percent increases, one focusing on percentages and one focusing on ratios.  They will be asked to choose which is the more efficient method of calculation and explain their reasoning.

Type: Lesson Plan

Landmark Supreme Court Cases…Wrap it up! Part 2:

This is lesson 2 of 3 in a mini-unit integrating civics and 7th Grade ELA. In this lesson students will be continuing to review 9 Landmark Supreme Court cases with an interactive PowerPoint with primary source quotes that allow students to determine the cases discussed in each of the quotes. Students will then work through an activity (Think,  Write, Pair, Share) to compare and contrast two court cases that they think had the most significant impact on society.

Type: Lesson Plan

WHO’S IN THE HOUSE? PART 1:

Students will use ratios to discuss and examine the relationship between a Census, state populations, and apportionment of representatives in the House of Representatives, in this integrated lesson plan. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Which Services can we Afford? Part 2 of 3:

In this lesson, students will be presented with the same scenario as lesson 1. Now there are additional taxes revenues that came in due to new developments in the area. The budget has a 12.5% increase but due to the new developments, there are allocation constraints to the budget. After dispersing their new funds students will compare their results with their original analysis. This is lesson 2 of 3 in a mini-unit integrating math and civics.

Type: Lesson Plan

Which Services can we Afford? Part 3 of 3:

In this lesson, students will peer review their assignments from lessons 1 and 2 to compare their solutions and determine the validity of the classmate’s process according to the provided rubric. This is lesson 3 of 3 in a mini-unit integrating math and civics.

Type: Lesson Plan

Landmark Supreme Court Cases…Wrap it up! Part 1:

This is lesson 1 of 3 in a mini-unit integrating civics and 7th Grade ELA. In this lesson, students will be reviewing 9 Landmark Supreme Court cases with an interactive PowerPoint. Students will take guided notes while recognizing the constitutional principles and individual rights in these cases and how they have impacted society. Academic vocabulary will be integrated into the lesson with a culminating key academic vocab activity. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Which Services can we Afford? Part 1of 3:

In this lesson, students will be re-introduced to ratios and percentages and explain how we use them for budgeting and taxes. Students will get information on tax income funds and use the information to allocate funds for providing the different services in a community (Police, Fire, Schools, Hospitals, Roads, etc.) This is lesson 1 of 3 in a mini-unit integrating civics and math.

Type: Lesson Plan

Legislative Representation Lesson 2:

Students will calculate the net change in the seats for the U.S. House of Representatives for each state. They will add all the net changes to equal 0, since the total number of seats has remained constant at 435 during this time period. They will then calculate the percent change for each state from the 1960 U.S. Census to the 2020 U.S. Census, in this integrated lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Political Cartoons as Commentary on Supreme Court cases:

Students will research and review a landmark Supreme Court case, evaluate the effect the case had on society, and plan and create a political cartoon based on the case, in this integrated civics and visual arts lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Where Do Our Taxes Go?:

In this lesson plan, students will learn that each level of government can tax. Students will then analyze the functions of government and explain how those taxes can support the continuation of those functions. Teachers will help guide students in researching how taxes work at each level of government - federal, state and local. While the research for all students will remain the same for federal and state, it is the local (county) government taxes where they may need some additional support in conducting research.

Type: Lesson Plan

Researching Landmark Supreme Court Cases: Lesson 3 of 3:

Students will create a public service announcement (PSA) using block coding in Scratch to raise awareness of a landmark Supreme Court case. Students will use feedback from a peer review exercise to revise their PSA. This is lesson three of a 3-part integrated computer science and civics mini-unit.

Type: Lesson Plan

A Long Walk to Water Lesson 3: Government Obligations/Services:

This is a lesson in the text unit series for A Long Walk to Water. Using prior knowledge students have acquired pertaining to the U.S. Constitution and the establishment of shared powers, students will read, infer, paraphrase, classify, and describe the government's obligations and services extended to citizens of Sudan at the Federal and State levels. Additionally, students will be able to compare the impact of Federal and State powers on the citizens of Sudan explaining it's importance on U.S. history.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

Landmark Supreme Court Cases: Lesson 2 of 3:

Students will apply landmark Supreme Court Case research to interact with a Scratch animation. Students will plan a Scratch public service announcement for Lesson 3. This is lesson 2 of a 3-part integrated computer science and civics unit.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

Legislative Representation Lesson 1:

Students will use percentages and ratios to determine the portion of political party affiliation to number of seats of a county commission. Students will discuss the legislative branch of our government and compare it at the local, state and national levels in this integrated lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Analyzing Government Spending: Integrating math & civics:

Students will practice their skills in interpreting data and creating graphical representations in this integrated civics lesson. Students will apply graphing skills to analyze government spending data and reflect on the importance of mathematics in communicating complex numerical information visually so the public can better stay informed.

Type: Lesson Plan

Fractions and Percentages of the Legislative Branch:

Students will use fractions, decimals, and percentages to compare the number of seats that Florida (as well as other states) has in the U.S. House of Representatives to the total amount of seats in the House of Representatives in this integrated lesson plan.  

 

Type: Lesson Plan

Debugging the Electoral College-Lesson 3:

This is the final lesson in a 3-lesson unit. In this lesson, students will review the Electoral College by debugging and improving upon a Scratch simulation of a presidential election map. Students will also apply their knowledge of variables and inequalities through the debugging process.

Type: Lesson Plan

Percent of Change and the House of Representatives:

Students will use ratios to explore the percentage of seats in the U.S. House of Representatives for different states.  They will analyze the 2020 United States Census to study how the population changes the number of representatives from each state. Students will compare the highest populated and least populated states based on this data in this integrated lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Signage Usage and Regulations - Part 3:

The students will be able to use their research on signage in a variety of areas such as national parks, roadways, and local areas of their choice to create a Scratch presentation to share their understanding of the signage obligations of local, state, and national governments. This is part 3 of a 3-part integrated lesson plan that integrates Civics with Computer Science and Coding.

Type: Lesson Plan

Debugging the Electoral College-Lesson 2:

This is lesson 2 of a 3-lesson unit. In this lesson, students learn about how variables and inequalities are used in both math and computer science through the exploration of how a win/loss is calculated in an Electoral College model/simulator.

Type: Lesson Plan

Signage Usage and Regulations Part 2:

In this lesson, students will engage in research using local, state, and federal sites to collect information on signage.  This is part 2 of a 3 part integrated lesson plan that integrates Civics with Computer Science and Coding.

Type: Lesson Plan

The White House & The Executive Branch:

In this lesson, students will identify the location of the White House and why it serves as a landmark that is emblematic of the United States. Students will also learn about the White House serving as the “home” of the executive branch, the structure of the executive, and the roles and responsibilities of the executive branch.

Type: Lesson Plan

Paraphrasing LBJ: American Progress:

In this lesson, students will sharpen their paraphrasing skills using a speech by President Lyndon B. Johnson. Students will paraphrase several key sections from LBJ's speech following the 1968 Civil Rights Act. In doing so, they will learn the four steps to paraphrasing effectively.

Type: Lesson Plan

Freedom of Speech: Text Features & Purpose:

In this lesson plan, students will examine the specific text features within a document describing the landmark Supreme Court case, Tinker v. Des Moines. Students will learn the definition of text features and how these features are used to help organize and present information in the text. In addition, sudents will analyze the details of the case and the Supreme Court's final ruling. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Comparing Systems of Government:

In this lesson plan, students will fill in a worksheet that is provided to them as the teacher goes through a PowerPoint that describes the different systems of government and compares the systems of government to an octopus. As the teacher goes through the PowerPoint, the teacher should be sure to stop and ask questions. There is also a quiz that can be administered after students have finished the assignment.

Type: Lesson Plan

Federalism Interactive Chart:

Students will define and identify examples of enumerated, concurrent, and reserved powers set forth by the U.S. Constitution. Each student will be provided a blank chart and a set of cards they will use to complete their charts. Each card contains either a definition or example of an enumerated, concurrent, or reserved power of government. In pairs or small groups, students will go through each card and discuss if they believe the power is held by the national government, state governments, or shared between the two. This lesson requires one chart per student, a set of cards to complete the chart, and approximately 30 minutes of class time. A PowerPoint lesson is included along with a completed chart for reference.

Type: Lesson Plan

Debugging the Electoral College-Lesson 1:

This is lesson 1 of a 3-lesson unit. In this unit, students will learn about the Electoral College system used in presidential elections as well as how we use computer programs to create models and simulations that produce visual representations and predictions during the election process. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Global Economic Systems:

Students will rotate through country stations that demonstrate the economic systems of capitalism, communism, and socialism.  They will analyze characteristics of each country to determine its economic system and compare those to characteristics of the United States. Students will explain how free markets advantage the United States. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Researching Landmark U.S. Supreme Court Cases: Lesson 1 of 3:

Students will research and summarize civil rights landmark U.S. Supreme Court cases. The next two lessons will include the application of this research to create and debug a Scratch animation. This is lesson 1 of a 3-part integrated computer science and civics unit.

Type: Lesson Plan

Raising the Bar: A look at Capitalist vs. Government-Controlled Nations:

This lesson is called “Raising the Bar- A look at Capitalist vs. Government Controlled Nations.” This activity will help students to gain a deeper understanding of the differences between capitalism and socialism/communism and the advantages of capitalism based on the GDP and GDP per capita of eight nations. This activity should follow an introductory lesson on the forms/systems of government and economic systems. The teacher will provide students with information on the types of economic systems and provide them with data on eight selected nations. Students will work collaboratively to create color-coded bar graphs to show GDP or GDP per capita over 20 years (2002, 2012, and 2022) for the eight selected nations. Students will use this information to determine the advantages of capitalist/free-market system.

Type: Lesson Plan

Signage Usage and Regulations - Part 1:

The students will be able to identify different signage in a variety of areas such as national parks, roadways, and local areas from a teacher directed scratch program. This is part 1 of a 3 part integrated lesson plan that integrates Civics with Computer Science and Coding.

Type: Lesson Plan

The United States Supreme Court & the Judicial Branch:

In this lesson, students will identify the location of the Supreme Court of the United States and why it serves as a landmark that is emblematic of the United States. Students will also learn about the Supreme Court of the U.S. structure serving as the “home” of the judicial branch, the structure of the judicial branch, and the roles and responsibilities of the judicial branch.   

 

Type: Lesson Plan

The U.S. Capitol & The Legislative Branch :

In this lesson, students will identify the location of the U.S. Capitol building and why it serves as a landmark that is emblematic of the United States. Students will also learn about the capitol serving as a “home” to the legislative branch, the structure of the legislative branch, and the roles and responsibilities of the legislative branch.   

Type: Lesson Plan

Exploring the U.S. Senate:

In this lesson plan, students will learn about the function of the U.S. Senate and the qualifications and responsibilities of senators, while completing guided notes that accompany a teacher-presented slideshow.  Students will then show what they know by completing and submitting a short written response to a provided prompt.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Executive Branch:

In this lesson plan, students will learn about the structures, functions, and processes of the executive branch while completing guided notes that accompany a teacher-presented slideshow.  Students will then show what they know by researching executive branch departments.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Legislative Branch:

In this lesson plan, students will learn about the federal legislative branch while completing guided notes that accompany a teacher-presented slideshow.  Students will then apply what they know by completing an exit ticket.   

Type: Lesson Plan

The Federal Lawmaking Process:

In this lesson plan, students will learn about the federal lawmaking process while completing guided notes that accompany a teacher-presented slideshow.  Students will then apply what they know by creating a flowchart to demonstrate the lawmaking process.

Type: Lesson Plan

Who Can Serve?:

In this lesson plan, students will identify the constitutional qualifications for holding state and national office while completing guided notes that accompany a teacher-presented slideshow. Students will then show what they know by completing and submitting a short written response to a provided prompt.

Type: Lesson Plan

An Introduction to the U.S. Constitution:

In this lesson plan, students will learn about the U.S. Constitution, with an emphasis on the Preamble, while completing guided notes that accompany a teacher-presented slideshow.  Students will then show what they know by completing and submitting an exit ticket.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

Switching on the Lights:

Students will explore how electricity is provided to the citizens of Florida and the state and local government’s role in that service. They will explore an interactive map of the various types of power plants in Florida and describe the transformations in energy that occur when different fuel sources are used. The class will discuss the responsibility of the government in ensuring the citizens of Florida have the electricity they need in this integrated lesson plan.

 

 

Type: Lesson Plan

Freedom Walkers Lesson 1: The Importance of the Montgomery Bus Boycott:

In this lesson, students will research events related to and depicted in the informational text, Freedom Walkers, compiling their research on a timeline of events that occurred before, during, and after the Montgomery Bus Boycott in the 1950s. Students will examine the impact of two key amendments on the fight for equality in this integrated lesson plan.

This resource uses a book that is on the Florida Department of Education's reading list. This book is not provided with this resource.

Type: Lesson Plan

A Government for Me:

In this lesson plan, students will analyze the advantages of the United States’ constitutional republic by comparing and contrasting different forms of governments and evaluating different scenarios.

Type: Lesson Plan

Types of Laws:

In this lesson plan, students will identify types and sources of U.S. law while completing guided notes that accompany a teacher-presented slideshow.  Students will then show what they know through writing.

Type: Lesson Plan

Let’s go back to the Electoral College:

In this lesson, students will examine Article 2 as well as the 12th Amendment to the U.S. Constitution to learn about the Electoral College and how it works. Students will then interpret maps and population data to determine the impact it has on the political process.

Type: Lesson Plan

Exploring Rule of Law:

In this lesson plan, students will learn to define the rule of law and explore its key principles while completing guided notes that accompany a teacher-presented slideshow. Students will then show what they know by completing and submitting a short written response to a provided prompt.

Type: Lesson Plan

America’s Founding Principles :

In this lesson plan, students will trace the principles underlying America’s founding ideas on laws and government while completing guided notes that accompany a teacher-presented slideshow. Students will then show what they know by completing and submitting a short written response to a provided prompt.

Type: Lesson Plan

Trial Process and Role of Juries:

In this lesson plan, students will describe the trial process and role of juries in the administration of justice at both state and federal levels. Students will act out a Mock Trial and answer questions based on the process shown during the play. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Frederick Douglass Narrative: Freedom and the 13-15th Amendments:

After close readings of Douglass’ speech from Chapter 10 and the 13th-15th amendments, students will respond to text dependent questions and consider how the changes brought by the amendments impacted Douglass’ life in this integrated lesson plan.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

Lifting the Standard of Living: Capitalism and the Free Market:

In this lesson plan, students will be introduced to different economic systems. Through collaborative learning, students will explore economic system scenarios and complete a written response to show their understanding of the various economic systems, and which one provides the best opportunity for economic prosperity.

Type: Lesson Plan

What’s the Deal with the Electoral College?:

In this lesson plan, students will take notes on the history, changes, pros, and cons of the Electoral College while being guided through an interactive PowerPoint. Following reading and notetaking, students will be introduced to an activity with movement, discussion, and debate called Hop the Line. Students will engage in respectful, evidence-based dialogue to share their evidence-based views on the following topic: The Electoral College should remain the process of electing the U.S. President.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Limits of Speech:

In this lesson plan, students will study four landmark Supreme Court cases all dealing with First Amendment free speech issues. Students will analyze all four cases using a graphic organizer. Then students will complete a short writing assignment in which they make and support a claim about one case and the Court's decision regarding free speech.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Judicial Branch:

In this lesson plan, students will learn about the federal judicial branch while completing guided notes that accompany a teacher-presented slideshow.  Students will then apply what they know by researching a landmark Supreme Court case and creating a one-pager.

Type: Lesson Plan

Analyzing Landmark Supreme Court Cases:

In this lesson, students will explore landmark case details and decisions of the U.S. Supreme Court. In both individual and small group settings, students will explain the case arguments and legal interpretations, and analyze the individual/societal impacts of these landmark cases on rights and liberties. 

Type: Lesson Plan

U.S. Constitution Amendment Process:

In this lesson plan, students will explain the methods to propose and ratify amendments to the U.S. Constitution while recognizing the difficulty to successfully amend the document.

Type: Lesson Plan

Show Me the Money: Capitalism, Socialism, Communism:

The lesson begins with students exploring the terms economic freedom and standard of living in a group discussion.  Students will complete graphic organizers about capitalism, socialism, and communism as they learn via a provided PowerPoint presentation.  Students will reflect in writing on the advantages of capitalism and the free market. 

Type: Lesson Plan

The Presidency:

In this lesson plan, students will learn about the powers of the American presidency while completing guided notes that accompany a teacher-presented slideshow.  Students will then show what they know by discussing the topic and sharing their responses.

Type: Lesson Plan

Comparing Amendments:

Students will read brief summaries about different amendments ratified throughout history intended to expand civic participation, analyze voter turnout and voting age population data for presidential elections before and after the ratification of each amendment, and use percentages and ratios to rank the amendments in order of most to least effective in expanding civic participation, in this model eliciting activity.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations.  Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Identifying Sources and Types of Law:

In this lesson plan, students will apply their knowledge of sources and types of law to understanding the historical influences on the rule of law in the United States. Students will work in small groups to demonstrate an understanding of the sources and types of law by analyzing various scenarios using stations and guided notes. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Who Would You Call?:

In this lesson plan, students will identify which level of government would be responsible for addressing a number of concerns.

Type: Lesson Plan

Whose Power Is It, Anyway?:

Students will review the 10th Amendent and Article IV of the U.S. Constitution in order to determine how and why federalism is an important feature of the U.S. government.  The teacher will present an interactive PowerPoint that includes a graphic organizer, discussion opportunities, and a formative assessment.  After students complete the PowerPoint, they will have the opportunity to test their skills visually through a game of Pictionary.

Type: Lesson Plan

Electoral College:

In this lesson plan, students will explain the purpose and function of the Electoral College in electing the President of the United States.

Type: Lesson Plan

The 14th Amendment and U.S. Citizenship:

In this lesson plan, students will identify the three ways of becoming a citizen, law of blood, law of soil, and the naturalization process. Students will then use their knowledge to analyze the 14th Amendment and identify that the 14th Amendment protects all citizens, no matter if they are natural born or naturalized.

Type: Lesson Plan

Comparing Amendments:

In this lesson plan, students will analyze voter turnout and voting age population data for past presidential elections to explore how various amendments broadened the opportunity for civic participation in the political process.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

Broadening Political Participation: Constitutional Amendments:

Students will begin this lesson by reviewing the Bill of Rights and discussing the need for additional amendments.  Students will then collaborate to read the 13th, 14th, 15th, 19th, 24th, and 26th amendments in order to complete a graphic organizer.  Ultimately, students will test their knowledge of the new amendments, as well as the Bill of Rights, in a game of GO FISH!

Type: Lesson Plan

U.S. and Florida Constitutions:

In this lesson plan, students will define the purpose of a constitution, explain the basic outlines of the U.S. and Florida Constitutions, describe the amendment processes for both, and recognize the U.S. Constitution is the supreme law of the land.

Type: Lesson Plan

Build a New School:

Students will calculate, interpret, and use measures of center and spread of different populations to determine in which city in Manatee County new schools should be built. Students will also use percentages to estimate the future population of school-aged children which will be used to determine where new schools should be built.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here: https://www.cpalms.org/cpalms/mea.aspx to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.They resemble engineering problems and encourage students to create solutions in the form of mathematical and scientific models. MEAs follow a problem-based, student centered approach to learning, where students are encouraged to grapple with the problem while the teacher acts as a facilitator.

Type: Lesson Plan

Landmark Supreme Court Cases- Let's Review!:

In this lesson plan, students will review landmark Supreme Court cases. Working in pairs, students will identify the constitutional issue of each case, the Court’s decision, and the significance of each case on United States society. During the activity, the teacher will facilitate the learning process by offering background information and other assistance as needed. At the conclusion of the activity, the teacher will lead a class discussion on the impact and importance of each landmark case.

 

Type: Lesson Plan

The Electoral College and the Presidency:

In this lesson plan, students will learn about the purpose and the function of the Electoral College.  Students will complete a graphic organizer as a notetaking strategy while learning via a slideshow.  Students will then learn about the tie during the election of 1800 to determine how the 12th Amendment rectified the situation for the future.  Lastly, students will grapple with an electoral map to strategize which states they would focus on in order to reach 270 votes.

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorials

About the Electoral College: Part 2:

Learn more about how the President of the United States is elected, and what the Electoral College is, in this two-part interactive tutorial.

This is part 2 in a two-part series. Click HERE to open Part 1.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

About the Electoral College: Part 1:

Learn more about how the President of the United States is elected, and what the Electoral College is, in this two-part interactive tutorial.

This is part 1 in a two-part series. Click HERE to open Part 2.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

All About Impeachment: Part 2:

In Part 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the impeachment process detailed in the U.S. Constitution, including what it is, who can be impeached, why someone would be impeached, and some famous examples of impeachment in action.   

This is Part 2 in a two-part series. Click HERE to open Part 1.

 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

All About Impeachment: Part 1:

In Part 1 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the impeachment process detailed in the U.S. Constitution, including what it is, who can be impeached, why someone would be impeached, and a bit about the process.  

 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Government Takes Many Forms:

In this interactive tutorial, learn about the forms governments take, including monarchy, democracy, autocracy, and oligarchy.  You'll also learn about the advantages of a constitutional republic, the chosen form of government of the United States.   

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Judicial Review: Brought to You by Marbury v. Madison:

In this interactive tutorial, learn about the famous Supreme Court case Marbury v. Madison, which established the principle of judicial review.  You'll examine the details of the case and its important legacy in American history.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evaluating Constitutional Rights:

In this interactive tutorial, explore several landmark cases of the Supreme Court to see how the Court's decisions have impacted the rights of individuals and society throughout American history.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Government: A "Systematic" Approach:

In this interactive tutorial, learn about three systems of government: federal, unitary, and confederal (a confederation).

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Federal Government: The Three Branches in Action :

In this interactive tutorial, you'll examine the powers and workings of the three branches of our federal government.  You'll learn what Congress, the President, and the Supreme Court really do.  Enjoy!

Type: Original Student Tutorial

We Have Three Governments?:

In this interactive tutorial, explore the impact of federal, state, and local governments on your daily life.   

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Sunshine State Government:

In this interactive tutorial, explore the state government of Florida and learn how its three branches are modeled after those in the federal government.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Constitutional Amendments: The Expansion of Democracy :

In this interactive tutorial, learn about six important amendments to the U.S. Constitution.  These amendments ended slavery, ensured equal rights for all citizens, and guaranteed voting rights to women, African Americans, and other minority groups.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Understanding Rule of Law:

In this interactive tutorial, learn about one of the most important principles in American democracy: rule of law.  You'll explore this important concept and learn about its application to a famous Supreme Court decision: United States v. Nixon.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Finding Civic Solutions:

This interactive tutorial will help you answer the questions: What can individuals do on their own to make change? When can your government help you?  To which government can you turn?  Learn about responsible citizenship and how you might make positive changes in your own community. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

What's Law Got to Do with It?:

In this interactive tutorial, explore the sources and types of laws in the American legal system.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Comparing Constitutions: Florida vs. the United States:

In this interactive tutorial, explore the similarities and differences between the federal Constitution of the United States and the state Constitution of Florida.  You'll also learn about our system of federalism and how it is expressed in these Constitutions.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

"Do You Have an Eraser?" Amending the Constitution:

This interactive tutorial teaches you all about the process of amending (changing) the United States Constitution.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Journey Through Justice: Our Federal Courts:

Learn about the different levels of our federal judicial system, from federal district courts all the way up to the one and only Supreme Court. In this interactive tutorial, you'll also learn about the landmark Supreme Court case Tinker v. Des Moines, which set an important precedent for students' right to free speech in schools.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Supreme Court and Equal Rights: Two Famous Cases:

In this interactive tutorial, learn how the decisions of the United States Supreme Court have affected the equal rights of Americans. You'll learn the outcomes and impacts of two famous cases: Plessy vs. Ferguson and Brown vs. Board of Education.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Three Branches of Government:

Learn how to identify the three branches of the federal government as established by the Constitution of the United States. In this interactive tutorial, you will also learn to identify the structure and function of each branch of government.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Which Government Is Which?:

In this interactive tutorial, compare and contrast different forms of government, including democracy, socialism, communism, monarchy, oligarchy, and autocracy.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

We Have Two Governments?:

In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn how and why American citizens are governed by TWO governments which share power: the federal government of the United States and the government of the state in which they live.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How Are Laws Made?:

In this interactive tutorial, learn how a bill becomes a law. You will see how bills (ideas for laws) are passed by Congress and signed into law by the president, and you'll learn how all three branches of government play a role in determining the laws of our land.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Teaching Idea

Grade 7 Civics Family Guide: Standard 3:

This Grade 7 Civics Family Guide provides some ideas and activities to support civics education when at home, out and about, and in the community. The activities provided align to the civics learning benchmarks within Standard 3 at this grade level.

Type: Teaching Idea

Video/Audio/Animations

Portraits in Patriotism - Ardian Zika: Secondary School:

Adrian Zika grew up in communist Yugoslavia (now Kosovo). He immigrated to the United States, became a U.S. citizen, and was elected to the Florida House of Representatives in 2018.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Portraits in Patriotism - Mel Martinez: Middle and High School:

Former U.S Senator and Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Mel Martínez shares his journey to freedom in the United States. Mr. Martínez was part of Operation Pedro Pan in which unaccompanied Cuban children were sent to the United States to escape the newly formed communist regime of Fidel Castro. Before leaving Cuba, he spent time with his father who shared life lessons with his son. Mr. Martínez distinctly remembers the pilot announcing that they were in America. After moving around the state of Florida in settlement camps, Mr. Martínez was placed in foster care. After four years he and his family were reunited. Mr. Martínez helped his father become a veterinarian in the U.S and as a family they were highly active in the community. His family’s spirit of activism was the foundation of Mr. Martínez’s career as a public servant. He graduated from Florida State University Law School in 1973 and began his political career. He was appointed the U.S. Secretary of Housing and Urban Development in 2001 and became a United States Senator in 2005.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Portraits in Patriotism - Alejandro Brice: Middle - High School:

Alejandro Brice and his family immigrated from Cuba at the beginning of the Cuban Revolution. His father was jailed as a counter-revolutionary sympathizer and upon release, the family fled the country. Dr. Brice shares his memories of his “freedom wings”, the culture shock of growing up in Ohio as immigrants, learning English in elementary school, watching his family start over, and becoming a U.S. Citizen. Dr. Brice is a college professor specializing in the education of immigrant children and English language learners.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Portraits in Patriotism - Ivonne Blank: Middle and High School:

Ivonne Blank immigrated to the United States in 1961 as part of Operation Pedro Pan, the largest exodus on unaccompanied minors in the Western Hemisphere. Ms. Blank talks about how difficult it was waiting for her parents and living in an orphanage in Denver, CO. Her parents later left the island by boat, were rescued by the Coast Guard, and resettled in the United States. After the family was reunited, they were able to rebuild their lives with support from their community. Ms. Blank went on to become a lifelong educator and U.S. citizen.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Portraits in Patriotism - Luis Martínez Fernández: Middle - High School:

Luis Martínez-Fernández was born at the beginning of the Cuban Revolution. Dr. Martínez-Fernández immigrated to the United States with his family when he was 2 years old after the Bay of Pigs Invasion. His family moved to Lima, Peru after his father was offered employment there. Dr. Martínez-Fernández’s family left Peru after the President of Peru was ousted from power. The new government in Peru concerned Dr. Martínez-Fernández’s father and the family moved to Puerto Rico where they become U.S. Citizens. Dr. Martínez-Fernández moved to the U.S. after graduation from The University of Puerto Rico. He is a Professor of History, an author, and is civically engaged through his nationally syndicated column.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this topic.

Original Student Tutorials

About the Electoral College: Part 2:

Learn more about how the President of the United States is elected, and what the Electoral College is, in this two-part interactive tutorial.

This is part 2 in a two-part series. Click HERE to open Part 1.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

About the Electoral College: Part 1:

Learn more about how the President of the United States is elected, and what the Electoral College is, in this two-part interactive tutorial.

This is part 1 in a two-part series. Click HERE to open Part 2.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

All About Impeachment: Part 2:

In Part 2 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the impeachment process detailed in the U.S. Constitution, including what it is, who can be impeached, why someone would be impeached, and some famous examples of impeachment in action.   

This is Part 2 in a two-part series. Click HERE to open Part 1.

 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

All About Impeachment: Part 1:

In Part 1 of this interactive tutorial series, learn about the impeachment process detailed in the U.S. Constitution, including what it is, who can be impeached, why someone would be impeached, and a bit about the process.  

 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Government Takes Many Forms:

In this interactive tutorial, learn about the forms governments take, including monarchy, democracy, autocracy, and oligarchy.  You'll also learn about the advantages of a constitutional republic, the chosen form of government of the United States.   

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Judicial Review: Brought to You by Marbury v. Madison:

In this interactive tutorial, learn about the famous Supreme Court case Marbury v. Madison, which established the principle of judicial review.  You'll examine the details of the case and its important legacy in American history.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Evaluating Constitutional Rights:

In this interactive tutorial, explore several landmark cases of the Supreme Court to see how the Court's decisions have impacted the rights of individuals and society throughout American history.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Government: A "Systematic" Approach:

In this interactive tutorial, learn about three systems of government: federal, unitary, and confederal (a confederation).

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Federal Government: The Three Branches in Action :

In this interactive tutorial, you'll examine the powers and workings of the three branches of our federal government.  You'll learn what Congress, the President, and the Supreme Court really do.  Enjoy!

Type: Original Student Tutorial

We Have Three Governments?:

In this interactive tutorial, explore the impact of federal, state, and local governments on your daily life.   

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Sunshine State Government:

In this interactive tutorial, explore the state government of Florida and learn how its three branches are modeled after those in the federal government.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Constitutional Amendments: The Expansion of Democracy :

In this interactive tutorial, learn about six important amendments to the U.S. Constitution.  These amendments ended slavery, ensured equal rights for all citizens, and guaranteed voting rights to women, African Americans, and other minority groups.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Understanding Rule of Law:

In this interactive tutorial, learn about one of the most important principles in American democracy: rule of law.  You'll explore this important concept and learn about its application to a famous Supreme Court decision: United States v. Nixon.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Finding Civic Solutions:

This interactive tutorial will help you answer the questions: What can individuals do on their own to make change? When can your government help you?  To which government can you turn?  Learn about responsible citizenship and how you might make positive changes in your own community. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

What's Law Got to Do with It?:

In this interactive tutorial, explore the sources and types of laws in the American legal system.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Comparing Constitutions: Florida vs. the United States:

In this interactive tutorial, explore the similarities and differences between the federal Constitution of the United States and the state Constitution of Florida.  You'll also learn about our system of federalism and how it is expressed in these Constitutions.  

Type: Original Student Tutorial

"Do You Have an Eraser?" Amending the Constitution:

This interactive tutorial teaches you all about the process of amending (changing) the United States Constitution.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Journey Through Justice: Our Federal Courts:

Learn about the different levels of our federal judicial system, from federal district courts all the way up to the one and only Supreme Court. In this interactive tutorial, you'll also learn about the landmark Supreme Court case Tinker v. Des Moines, which set an important precedent for students' right to free speech in schools.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Supreme Court and Equal Rights: Two Famous Cases:

In this interactive tutorial, learn how the decisions of the United States Supreme Court have affected the equal rights of Americans. You'll learn the outcomes and impacts of two famous cases: Plessy vs. Ferguson and Brown vs. Board of Education.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

The Three Branches of Government:

Learn how to identify the three branches of the federal government as established by the Constitution of the United States. In this interactive tutorial, you will also learn to identify the structure and function of each branch of government.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Which Government Is Which?:

In this interactive tutorial, compare and contrast different forms of government, including democracy, socialism, communism, monarchy, oligarchy, and autocracy.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

We Have Two Governments?:

In this interactive tutorial, you'll learn how and why American citizens are governed by TWO governments which share power: the federal government of the United States and the government of the state in which they live.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How Are Laws Made?:

In this interactive tutorial, learn how a bill becomes a law. You will see how bills (ideas for laws) are passed by Congress and signed into law by the president, and you'll learn how all three branches of government play a role in determining the laws of our land.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this topic.

Teaching Idea

Grade 7 Civics Family Guide: Standard 3:

This Grade 7 Civics Family Guide provides some ideas and activities to support civics education when at home, out and about, and in the community. The activities provided align to the civics learning benchmarks within Standard 3 at this grade level.

Type: Teaching Idea