Standard 2: Write, solve and graph linear equations, functions and inequalities in one and two variables.

General Information
Number: MA.912.AR.2
Title: Write, solve and graph linear equations, functions and inequalities in one and two variables.
Type: Standard
Subject: Mathematics (B.E.S.T.)
Grade: 912
Strand: Algebraic Reasoning

Related Benchmarks

This cluster includes the following benchmarks.

Related Access Points

This cluster includes the following access points.

Access Points

MA.912.AR.2.AP.1
Given an equation in a real-world context, solve one-variable multi-step linear equations.
MA.912.AR.2.AP.2
Select a linear two-variable equation to represent relationships between quantities from a graph, a written description or a table of values within a mathematical or real-world context.
MA.912.AR.2.AP.3
Select a linear two-variable equation in slope intercept form for a line that is parallel or perpendicular to a given line and goes through a given point.
MA.912.AR.2.AP.4
Given a table, equation or written description of a linear function, select a graph of that function and determine at least two key features (can include domain, range, y-intercept or slope).
MA.912.AR.2.AP.5
Given a mathematical and/or real-world problem that is modeled with linear functions, solve the mathematical problem, or select the graph using key features (in terms of context) that represents this model.
MA.912.AR.2.AP.6
Given a mathematical and/or real-world context, select a one-variable linear inequality that represents the solution algebraically or graphically.
MA.912.AR.2.AP.7
Select a two-variable linear inequality to represent relationships between quantities from a graph.
MA.912.AR.2.AP.8
Given a two-variable linear inequality, select a graph that represents the solution.

Related Resources

Vetted resources educators can use to teach the concepts and skills in this topic.

Formative Assessments

What Is the Point?:

Students are asked to explain the relationship between a given linear equation and both a point on its graph and a point not on its graph.

Type: Formative Assessment

Graphing a Linear Function:

Students are asked to graph a linear function and to find the intercepts of the function as well as the maximum and minimum of the function within a given interval of the domain.

Type: Formative Assessment

Finding Solutions:

Students are asked to explain the relationship between a given linear equation and both a point on its graph and a point not on its graph.

Type: Formative Assessment

Solving a Multistep Inequality:

Students are asked to solve a multistep inequality.

Type: Formative Assessment

Solve for Y:

Students are asked to solve a linear inequality in one variable.

Type: Formative Assessment

Solve for X:

Students are asked to solve a linear equation in one variable.

Type: Formative Assessment

Solve for N:

Students are asked to solve a linear equation in one variable with fractional coefficients.

Type: Formative Assessment

Solve for M:

Students are asked to solve a linear equation in one variable.

Type: Formative Assessment

Writing Equations for Parallel Lines:

Students are asked to identify the slope of a line parallel to a given line and write an equation for the line given a point.

Type: Formative Assessment

Does It Follow?:

Students are asked if one linear equation follows from another that is assumed to be true.

Type: Formative Assessment

Uphill and Downhill:

Students are asked to interpret key features of a graph (intercepts and intervals over which the graph is increasing) in the context of a problem situation.

Type: Formative Assessment

Describe the Domain:

Students are given verbal descriptions of two functions and are asked to describe an appropriate domain for each.

Type: Formative Assessment

Height vs. Shoe Size:

Students are asked to identify and describe the domains of two functions given their graphs.

Type: Formative Assessment

Functions From Graphs:

Students are asked to write a function given its graph.

Type: Formative Assessment

Writing a Function From Ordered Pairs:

Students are given a table of values and are asked to write a linear function.

Type: Formative Assessment

The Cost of Water:

Students are asked to write a function to model the relationship between two variables described in a real-world context.

Type: Formative Assessment

Tech Repairs Graph:

Students are asked to graph an equation in two variables given in context.

Type: Formative Assessment

Writing Equations for Perpendicular Lines:

Students are asked to identify the slope of a line perpendicular to a given line and write an equation for the line given a point.

Type: Formative Assessment

Linear Inequalities in the Half-Plane:

Students are asked to graph all solutions for a non-strict <= or >= linear inequality in the coordinate plane.

Type: Formative Assessment

Graphing Linear Inequalities:

Students are asked to graph a strict < or > linear inequality in the coordinate plane.

 

Type: Formative Assessment

Lunch Account:

Students are given a linear function in context and asked to interpret its parameters in the context of a problem.

Type: Formative Assessment

Computer Repair:

Students are given a linear function in context and asked to interpret its parameters in the context of a problem.

Type: Formative Assessment

Tee It Up:

Students are asked to write an equation in three variables from a verbal description.

 

Note: This task may assess skills that exceed the general expectation for this mathematical concept at this grade level.  The task is intended for students who have demonstrated mastery within the scope of instruction who may be ready for a more rigorous extensions of the content. As with all materials, ensure to gauge the readiness of students or adapt according to students needs prior to administration.

Type: Formative Assessment

Tech Repairs:

Students are asked to write an equation in two variables from a verbal description.

Type: Formative Assessment

Constraints on Equations:

Students are asked to determine the constraint on a profit equation and to interpret solutions as being viable or not in the context of the problem.

Type: Formative Assessment

State Fair:

Students are asked to write and solve an equation that models a given problem.

Type: Formative Assessment

Music Club:

Students are given a real world context and asked to model the situation by writing and then solving a multistep inequality.

Type: Formative Assessment

Lesson Plans

Home Lines:

Students will create an outline of a room and write equations of the lines that contain the sides of the room. This lesson provides an opportunity to review and reinforce writing equations of lines (including horizontal and vertical lines) and to apply the relationship between the slopes of parallel and perpendicular lines.

Type: Lesson Plan

Space Equations:

In this lesson, students model the orbit of a satellite and the trajectory of a missile with a system of equations. They solve the equations both graphically and algebraically.

Type: Lesson Plan

Solving Systems of Inequalities:

Students will learn to graph a system of inequalities and identify points in the solution set. This lesson aligns with the Mathematics Formative Assessment System (MFAS) Task Graph a System of Inequalities (CPALMS Resource #60567). In this lesson, students with similar instructional needs are grouped according to MFAS rubric levels: Getting Started, Moving Forward, Almost There, and Got It. Students in each group complete an exercise designed to move them toward a better understanding of solutions of systems of inequalities and their graphs.

Type: Lesson Plan

How Hot Is It?:

This lesson allows the students to connect the science of cricket chirps to mathematics. In this lesson, students will collect real data using the CD "Myths and Science of Cricket Chirps" (or use supplied data), display the data in a graph, and then find and use the mathematical model that fits their data.

Type: Lesson Plan

Span the Distance Glider - Correlation Coefficient:

This lesson will provide students with an opportunity to collect and analyze bivariate data and use technology to create scatter plots, lines of best fit, and determine the correlation strength of the data being compared. Students will have a hands on inquire based lesson that allows them to create gliders to analyze data. This lesson is an application of skills acquired in a bivariate unit of study.

Type: Lesson Plan

What Will I Pay?:

Who doesn't want to save money? In this lesson, students will learn how a better credit score will save them money. They will use a scatter plot to see the relationship between credit scores and car loan interest rates. They will determine a line of fit equation and interpret the slope and y-intercept to make conclusions about interest and credit scores.

Type: Lesson Plan

Why do I have to have a bedtime?:

This predict, observe, explain lesson that allows students to make predictions based on prior knowledge, observations, discussions, and calculations. Students will receive the opportunity to express themselves and their ideas while explaining what they learned. Students will make a prediction, collect data, and construct a scatter plot. Next, students will calculate the correlation coefficient and use it to describe the strength and magnitude of a relationship.

Type: Lesson Plan

Is My Model Working?:

Students will enjoy this project lesson that allows them to choose and collect their own data. They will create a scatter plot and find the line of fit. Next they write interpretations of their slope and y-intercept. Their final challenge is to calculate residuals and conclude whether or not their data is consistent with their linear model.

Type: Lesson Plan

What's Slope got to do with it?:

Students will interpret the meaning of slope and y-intercept in a wide variety of examples of real-world situations modeled by linear functions.

Type: Lesson Plan

Spaghetti Trend:

This lesson consists of using data to make scatter plots, identify the line of fit, write its equation, and then interpret the slope and the y-intercept in context. Students will also use the line of fit to make predictions.

Type: Lesson Plan

Slippery Slopes:

This lesson will not only reinforce students understanding of slope and y-intercept, but will also ensure the students understand how it can be modeled in a real world situation. The focus of this lesson is to emphasize that slope is a rate of change and the y-intercept the value of y when x is zero. Students will be able to read a problem and create a linear equation based upon what they read. They will then make predictions based upon this information.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Gumball Roll Lab:

This lesson is on motion of objects. Students will learn what factors affect the speed of an object through experimentation with gumballs rolling down an incline. The students will collect data through experimenting, create graphs from the data, interpret the slope of the graphs and create equations of lines from data points and the graph. They will understand the relationship of speed and velocity and be able to relate the velocity formula to the slope intercept form of the equation of a line.

Type: Lesson Plan

Whose Line Is It Anyway?:

In this lesson, students will use graphing calculators to explore linear equations in the form y = mx + b. They will observe the graphs of equations with different values of slope and y-intercept. They will draw conclusions about how the value of slope and y-intercept are visible in the appearance of the graph.

Type: Lesson Plan

Company Charges:

In this lesson, students will learn how to write and solve linear equations that have one solution, infinitely many solutions, and no solutions. As the students decipher word problems, they will recognize which elements of equations affect the number of possible solutions. This lesson is guided by a PowerPoint presentation.

Type: Lesson Plan

Testing water for drinking purposes:

The importance of knowing what drinking water contains. How to know what properties are present in different bottled water. Knowing the elements present in water that is advantageous to growth and development of many things in the body. To know what to be alert for in water and to understand the importance of water in general.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

How Fast Do Objects Fall?:

Students will investigate falling objects with very low air friction.

Type: Lesson Plan

Which Function?:

This activity has students apply their knowledge to distinguish between numerical data that can be modeled in linear or exponential forms. Students will create mathematical models (graph, equation) that represent the data and compare these models in terms of the information they show and their limitations. Students will use the models to compute additional information to predict future outcomes and make conjectures based on these predictions.

Type: Lesson Plan

Don't Blow the Budget!:

Students use systems of equations and inequalities to solve real world budgeting problems involving two variables.

Type: Lesson Plan

Graphing vs. Substitution. Which would you choose?:

Students will solve multiple systems of equations using two methods: graphing and substitution. This will help students to make a connection between the two methods and realize that they will indeed get the same solution graphically and algebraically.  Students will compare the two methods and think about ways to decide which method to use for a particular problem. This lesson connects prior instruction on solving systems of equations graphically with using algebraic methods to solve systems of equations.

Type: Lesson Plan

My Candles are MELTING!:

In this lesson, students will apply their knowledge to model a real-world linear situation in a variety of ways. They will analyze a situation in which 2 candles burn at different rates. They will create a table of values, determine a linear equation, and graph each to determine if and when the candles will ever be the same height. They will also determine the domain and range of their functions and determine whether there are constraints on their functions.

Type: Lesson Plan

Feasible or Non-Feasible? - That is the Question (Graphing Systems of Linear Inequalities):

In this lesson, students learn how to use the graph of a system of linear inequalities to determine the feasible region. Students practice solving word problems to find the optimal solution that maximizes profits. Students will use the free application, GeoGebra (see download link under Suggested Technology) to help them create different graphs and to determine the feasible or non-feasible solutions.

Type: Lesson Plan

When Will We Ever Meet?:

Students will be guided through the investigation of y = mx+b. Through this lesson, students will be able to determine whether lines are parallel, perpendicular, or neither by looking at the graph and the equation.

Type: Lesson Plan

Turning Tires Model Eliciting Activity:

The Turning Tires MEA provides students with an engineering problem in which they must work as a team to design a procedure to select the best tire material for certain situations. The main focus of the MEA is applying surface area concepts and algebra through modeling.

Model Eliciting Activities, MEAs, are open-ended, interdisciplinary problem-solving activities that are meant to reveal students’ thinking about the concepts embedded in realistic situations. Click here to learn more about MEAs and how they can transform your classroom.

Type: Lesson Plan

Determining the Hubble Constant:

Students will graph distance/velocity data of real galaxies to arrive at their own value of the Hubble constant (H). Once they have calculated their own value of H, they will use it to determine distances to real galaxies with known recessional velocities.

Type: Lesson Plan

Exploring Systems with Piggies, Pizzas and Phones:

Students write and solve linear equations from real-life situations. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Investigating Lines With Our Minds!:

Discover the relationships between the slopes of parallel and perpendicular lines. Students write the equations of lines parallel and/or perpendicular to a given line through a given point. Directions for using graph paper or x-y coordinate pegboards are given.

Type: Lesson Plan

Justly Justifying:

Students will review the properties used in solving simple equations through a quiz-quiz-trade activity. As a class, they will then associate these properties with individual steps in solving equations. The students will then participate in a Simultaneous Round Table to practice their justifications. Finish the lesson with a discussion on the different methods that students could use to acquire the correct answer. The following day, students will take a short quiz to identify misconceptions.

Type: Lesson Plan

Survey Says... We're Using TRIG!:

This lesson is meant as a review after being taught basic trigonometric functions. It will allow students to see and solve problems from a real-world setting. The Perspectives video presents math being used in the real-world as a multimedia enhancement to this lesson. Students will find this review lesson interesting and fun.

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorials

Solving Systems of Linear Equations Part 6: Writing Systems from Context:

Learn how to create systems of linear equations to represent contextual situations in this interactive tutorial.

This part 6 in a 7-part series. Click below to explore the other tutorials in the series. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Linear Functions: Jobs:

Learn how to interpret key features of linear functions and translate between representations of linear functions through exploring jobs for teenagers in this interactive tutorial. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Solving Inequalities and Graphing Solutions Part 2:

Learn how to solve and graph compound inequalities and determine if solutions are viable in part 2 of this interactive tutorial series.

Click HERE to open Part 1.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Writing Equations in Two Variables:

Learn how to write equations in two variables in this interactive tutorial. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Solving Inequalities and Graphing Solutions: Part 1:

Learn how to solve and graph one variable inequalities, including compound inequalities, in part 1 of this interactive tutorial series.

Click HERE to open Part 2.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Graphing Linear Inequalities:

Learn to graph linear inequalities in two variables to display their solutions as you complete this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Finding Solutions on a Graph:

Learn to determine the number of possible solutions for a linear equation with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Writing Inequalities with Money, Money, Money:

Write linear inequalities for different money situations in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Perspectives Video: Experts

Using Mathematics to Optimize Wing Design:

Nick Moore discusses his research behind optimizing wing design using inspiration from animals and how they swim and fly.

Download the CPALMS Perspectives video student note taking guide.

Type: Perspectives Video: Expert

Problem Solving with Project Constraints:

It's important to stay inside the lines of your project constraints to finish in time and under budget. This NASA systems engineer explains how constraints can actually promote creativity and help him solve problems!

Type: Perspectives Video: Expert

Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiasts

Solving Systems of Equations, Oceans & Climate:

Angela Dial discusses how she solves systems of equations to determine how the composition of ocean floor sediment has changed over 65 million years to help reveal more information regarding climate change.

Type: Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiast

Gear Heads and Gear Ratios:

Have a need for speed? Get out your spreadsheet! Race car drivers use algebraic formulas and spreadsheets to optimize car performance.

Type: Perspectives Video: Professional/Enthusiast

Perspectives Video: Teaching Ideas

Solving Equations using Zero Pairs:

Unlock an effective teaching strategy for teaching solving equations using zero pairs in this Teacher Perspectives video for educators.

Type: Perspectives Video: Teaching Idea

Programming Mathematics: Algebra, and Variables to control Open-source Hardware:

If you are having trouble understanding variables, this video might help you see the light.

Download the CPALMS Perspectives video student note taking guide.

Type: Perspectives Video: Teaching Idea

Problem-Solving Tasks

Coffee and Crime:

This problem solving task asks students to examine the relationship between shops and crimes by using a correlation coefficient. The implications of linking correlation with causation are discussed.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Unit Squares and Triangles:

This problem solving task asks students to find the area of a triangle by using unit squares and line segments.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Triangles inscribed in a circle:

This problem solving task challenges students to use ideas about linear functions in order to determine when certain angles are right angles.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

What functions do two graph points determine?:

This problem solving task challenges students to find the linear, exponential and quadratic functions based on two points.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

US Population 1982-1988:

This problem solving task asks students to predict and model US population based on a chart of US population data from 1982 to 1988.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Taxi!:

This simple conceptual problem does not require algebraic manipulation, but requires students to articulate the reasoning behind each statement. Students are asked to verify a given linear equation from data in a table and interpret its key components in context.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Sandia Aerial Tram:

The task provides an opportunity for students to engage in detailed analysis of the rate of change of the elevation.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Rumors:

This problem is an exponential function example that uses the real-world problem of how fast rumors spread.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Do two points always determine a linear function?:

In a geometric context, two distinct points ??1 and ??2 always determine a unique line in the Cartesian plane (this is one of the basic postulates of Euclidean geometry). Only the non-vertical lines, however, can be described by the graph of a function ??(??)=????+??. This task focuses on producing an explicit function ??(??) as long as the line is not vertical.

This problem allows the student to think geometrically about lines and then relate this geometry to linear functions. Or the student can work algebraically with equations to find the explicit equation of the line through two points (when that line is not vertical).

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Cash Box:

The given solutions for this task involve the creation and solving of a system of two equations and two unknowns, with the caveat that the context of the problem implies that we are interested only in non-negative integer solutions. Indeed, in the first solution, we must also restrict our attention to the case that one of the variables is further even. This aspect of the task is illustrative of the mathematical practice of modeling with mathematics, and crucial as the system has an integer solution for both situations, that is, whether we include the dollar on the floor in the cash box or not.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Two Lines:

In this task, we are given the graph of two lines including the coordinates of the intersection point and the coordinates of the two vertical intercepts and are asked for the corresponding equations of the lines. It is a very straightforward task that connects graphs and equations and solutions and intersection points.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Downhill:

This task would be especially well-suited for instructional purposes. Students will benefit from a class discussion about the slope, y-intercept, x-intercept, and implications of the restricted domain for interpreting more precisely what the equation is modeling.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Selling Fuel Oil at a Loss:

The task is a modeling problem which ties in to financial decisions faced routinely by businesses, namely the balance between maintaining inventory and raising short-term capital for investment or re-investment in developing the business.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

How Many Solutions?:

The student is given the equation 5x-2y=3 and asked, if possible, to write a second linear equation creating systems resulting in one, two, infinite, and no solutions.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Tutorials

Systems of Equations Word Problems Example 1:

This video demonstrates solving a word problem by creating a system of linear equations that represents the situation and solving them using elimination.

Type: Tutorial

Introduction to the Coordinate Plane:

In this video, you will learn about Rene Descartes, and how he bridged the gap between algebra and geometry.

Type: Tutorial

Calculating Mixtures of Solutions:

This lecture shows how algebra is used to solve problems involving mixtures of solutions of different concentrations.

Type: Tutorial

Video/Audio/Animations

Using Systems of Equations Versus One Equation:

When should a system of equations with multiple variables be used to solve an Algebra problem, instead of using a single equation with a single variable?

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Point-Slope Form:

The point-slope form of the equation for a line can describe any non-vertical line in the Cartesian plane, given the slope and the coordinates of a single point which lies on the line.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Two Point Form:

The two point form of the equation for a line can describe any non-vertical line in the Cartesian plane, given the coordinates of two points which lie on the line.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Student Resources

Vetted resources students can use to learn the concepts and skills in this topic.

Original Student Tutorials

Solving Systems of Linear Equations Part 6: Writing Systems from Context:

Learn how to create systems of linear equations to represent contextual situations in this interactive tutorial.

This part 6 in a 7-part series. Click below to explore the other tutorials in the series. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Linear Functions: Jobs:

Learn how to interpret key features of linear functions and translate between representations of linear functions through exploring jobs for teenagers in this interactive tutorial. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Solving Inequalities and Graphing Solutions Part 2:

Learn how to solve and graph compound inequalities and determine if solutions are viable in part 2 of this interactive tutorial series.

Click HERE to open Part 1.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Writing Equations in Two Variables:

Learn how to write equations in two variables in this interactive tutorial. 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Solving Inequalities and Graphing Solutions: Part 1:

Learn how to solve and graph one variable inequalities, including compound inequalities, in part 1 of this interactive tutorial series.

Click HERE to open Part 2.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Graphing Linear Inequalities:

Learn to graph linear inequalities in two variables to display their solutions as you complete this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Finding Solutions on a Graph:

Learn to determine the number of possible solutions for a linear equation with this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Writing Inequalities with Money, Money, Money:

Write linear inequalities for different money situations in this interactive tutorial.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Perspectives Video: Expert

Problem Solving with Project Constraints:

It's important to stay inside the lines of your project constraints to finish in time and under budget. This NASA systems engineer explains how constraints can actually promote creativity and help him solve problems!

Type: Perspectives Video: Expert

Problem-Solving Tasks

Coffee and Crime:

This problem solving task asks students to examine the relationship between shops and crimes by using a correlation coefficient. The implications of linking correlation with causation are discussed.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Unit Squares and Triangles:

This problem solving task asks students to find the area of a triangle by using unit squares and line segments.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Triangles inscribed in a circle:

This problem solving task challenges students to use ideas about linear functions in order to determine when certain angles are right angles.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

What functions do two graph points determine?:

This problem solving task challenges students to find the linear, exponential and quadratic functions based on two points.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

US Population 1982-1988:

This problem solving task asks students to predict and model US population based on a chart of US population data from 1982 to 1988.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Taxi!:

This simple conceptual problem does not require algebraic manipulation, but requires students to articulate the reasoning behind each statement. Students are asked to verify a given linear equation from data in a table and interpret its key components in context.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Sandia Aerial Tram:

The task provides an opportunity for students to engage in detailed analysis of the rate of change of the elevation.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Rumors:

This problem is an exponential function example that uses the real-world problem of how fast rumors spread.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Do two points always determine a linear function?:

In a geometric context, two distinct points ??1 and ??2 always determine a unique line in the Cartesian plane (this is one of the basic postulates of Euclidean geometry). Only the non-vertical lines, however, can be described by the graph of a function ??(??)=????+??. This task focuses on producing an explicit function ??(??) as long as the line is not vertical.

This problem allows the student to think geometrically about lines and then relate this geometry to linear functions. Or the student can work algebraically with equations to find the explicit equation of the line through two points (when that line is not vertical).

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Cash Box:

The given solutions for this task involve the creation and solving of a system of two equations and two unknowns, with the caveat that the context of the problem implies that we are interested only in non-negative integer solutions. Indeed, in the first solution, we must also restrict our attention to the case that one of the variables is further even. This aspect of the task is illustrative of the mathematical practice of modeling with mathematics, and crucial as the system has an integer solution for both situations, that is, whether we include the dollar on the floor in the cash box or not.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Two Lines:

In this task, we are given the graph of two lines including the coordinates of the intersection point and the coordinates of the two vertical intercepts and are asked for the corresponding equations of the lines. It is a very straightforward task that connects graphs and equations and solutions and intersection points.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Downhill:

This task would be especially well-suited for instructional purposes. Students will benefit from a class discussion about the slope, y-intercept, x-intercept, and implications of the restricted domain for interpreting more precisely what the equation is modeling.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Selling Fuel Oil at a Loss:

The task is a modeling problem which ties in to financial decisions faced routinely by businesses, namely the balance between maintaining inventory and raising short-term capital for investment or re-investment in developing the business.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

How Many Solutions?:

The student is given the equation 5x-2y=3 and asked, if possible, to write a second linear equation creating systems resulting in one, two, infinite, and no solutions.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Tutorials

Systems of Equations Word Problems Example 1:

This video demonstrates solving a word problem by creating a system of linear equations that represents the situation and solving them using elimination.

Type: Tutorial

Introduction to the Coordinate Plane:

In this video, you will learn about Rene Descartes, and how he bridged the gap between algebra and geometry.

Type: Tutorial

Calculating Mixtures of Solutions:

This lecture shows how algebra is used to solve problems involving mixtures of solutions of different concentrations.

Type: Tutorial

Video/Audio/Animations

Using Systems of Equations Versus One Equation:

When should a system of equations with multiple variables be used to solve an Algebra problem, instead of using a single equation with a single variable?

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Point-Slope Form:

The point-slope form of the equation for a line can describe any non-vertical line in the Cartesian plane, given the slope and the coordinates of a single point which lies on the line.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Two Point Form:

The two point form of the equation for a line can describe any non-vertical line in the Cartesian plane, given the coordinates of two points which lie on the line.

Type: Video/Audio/Animation

Parent Resources

Vetted resources caregivers can use to help students learn the concepts and skills in this topic.

Perspectives Video: Expert

Problem Solving with Project Constraints:

It's important to stay inside the lines of your project constraints to finish in time and under budget. This NASA systems engineer explains how constraints can actually promote creativity and help him solve problems!

Type: Perspectives Video: Expert

Problem-Solving Tasks

Coffee and Crime:

This problem solving task asks students to examine the relationship between shops and crimes by using a correlation coefficient. The implications of linking correlation with causation are discussed.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Unit Squares and Triangles:

This problem solving task asks students to find the area of a triangle by using unit squares and line segments.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Triangles inscribed in a circle:

This problem solving task challenges students to use ideas about linear functions in order to determine when certain angles are right angles.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

What functions do two graph points determine?:

This problem solving task challenges students to find the linear, exponential and quadratic functions based on two points.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

US Population 1982-1988:

This problem solving task asks students to predict and model US population based on a chart of US population data from 1982 to 1988.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Taxi!:

This simple conceptual problem does not require algebraic manipulation, but requires students to articulate the reasoning behind each statement. Students are asked to verify a given linear equation from data in a table and interpret its key components in context.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Sandia Aerial Tram:

The task provides an opportunity for students to engage in detailed analysis of the rate of change of the elevation.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Rumors:

This problem is an exponential function example that uses the real-world problem of how fast rumors spread.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Do two points always determine a linear function?:

In a geometric context, two distinct points ??1 and ??2 always determine a unique line in the Cartesian plane (this is one of the basic postulates of Euclidean geometry). Only the non-vertical lines, however, can be described by the graph of a function ??(??)=????+??. This task focuses on producing an explicit function ??(??) as long as the line is not vertical.

This problem allows the student to think geometrically about lines and then relate this geometry to linear functions. Or the student can work algebraically with equations to find the explicit equation of the line through two points (when that line is not vertical).

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Cash Box:

The given solutions for this task involve the creation and solving of a system of two equations and two unknowns, with the caveat that the context of the problem implies that we are interested only in non-negative integer solutions. Indeed, in the first solution, we must also restrict our attention to the case that one of the variables is further even. This aspect of the task is illustrative of the mathematical practice of modeling with mathematics, and crucial as the system has an integer solution for both situations, that is, whether we include the dollar on the floor in the cash box or not.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Two Lines:

In this task, we are given the graph of two lines including the coordinates of the intersection point and the coordinates of the two vertical intercepts and are asked for the corresponding equations of the lines. It is a very straightforward task that connects graphs and equations and solutions and intersection points.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Downhill:

This task would be especially well-suited for instructional purposes. Students will benefit from a class discussion about the slope, y-intercept, x-intercept, and implications of the restricted domain for interpreting more precisely what the equation is modeling.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

Selling Fuel Oil at a Loss:

The task is a modeling problem which ties in to financial decisions faced routinely by businesses, namely the balance between maintaining inventory and raising short-term capital for investment or re-investment in developing the business.

Type: Problem-Solving Task

How Many Solutions?:

The student is given the equation 5x-2y=3 and asked, if possible, to write a second linear equation creating systems resulting in one, two, infinite, and no solutions.

Type: Problem-Solving Task