Standard 3: Reading Across Genres

General Information
Number: ELA.9.R.3
Title: Reading Across Genres
Type: Standard
Subject: English Language Arts (B.E.S.T.)
Grade: 9
Strand: Reading

Related Benchmarks

This cluster includes the following benchmarks.

Related Access Points

This cluster includes the following access points.

Access Points

ELA.9.R.3.AP.1
Identify examples of figurative language that create mood in text(s).
ELA.9.R.3.AP.2
Summarize information from grade-level texts, at the student’s ability level using the student’s mode of communication.
ELA.9.R.3.AP.3
Identify the ways in which authors have adapted mythical, classical or religious texts.
ELA.9.R.3.AP.4
Identify an author’s use of rhetoric in a text.

Related Resources

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Lesson Plans

The Odyssey: Lesson Two: City-States, Democracy and Republicanism :

This lesson is #2 in an ELA/Civics Integrated Text Unit designed to support students with the integration of civics into the ELA classroom through the reading and study of Homer’s The Odyssey. After reading excerpts from Part 1 of The Odyssey, students will complete a research activity and include information in their writing plan for a comparative analysis of democracy in Ancient Greece and republicanism in the United States.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Odyssey: Lesson #1: Epic Heroes in Greece and America:

This is lesson 1 in a series of integrated civics lessons for the text The Odyssey by Homer. After reading and discussing Book One of The Odyssey, students will analyze how Odysseus fits the description of an epic hero by creating a trading card. Additionally, students will research one of the Founders of the United States to create a trading card as they determine and analyze how he fits the description of an epic hero.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Odyssey: Lesson Three: The Legacy of Leadership:

This lesson is #3 in an ELA/Civics Integrated Text Unit designed to support students with the integration of civics into the ELA classroom through the reading and study of Homer’s The Odyssey. This lesson should take place after students have read excerpts from Part 2 of The Odyssey. Students will use knowledge from lessons one and two as well as information from Article II of the United States Constitution to identify and explain the different presidential responsibilities such as receiving foreign heads of state. They will then create a “White House Press Briefing” outlining the U.S. President’s events of the day which includes a visit from a foreign head of state- Odysseus-who has come to the United States to learn more about how the United States borrowed from Greece when creating a constitutional republic.

Type: Lesson Plan

Paraphrasing President Obama: Answering the Call:

In this lesson, students will read President Barack Obama’s second inaugural address from 2013. Students will paraphrase several important sections of President Obama’s speech to develop their paraphrasing skills and evaluate the president’s use of figurative language and emotional appeal to establish purpose. Students will also complete text-dependent questions to further analyze the speech. As part of this analysis, they will express their comprehension of the key elements and overall message of his speech.

Type: Lesson Plan

What Does Epic Poetry Tell Us About The United States Government?:

After discussing the universal theme of “the struggle for equality,” in an epic, students will compare the theme to American government and The Declaration of Independence. This lesson is to be used before, during, or after reading and studying at least one Epic such as “The Epic of Gilgamesh,” “The Odyssey,” “Antigone,” “Beowulf,” “The Iliad,” and/or “The Aeneid,” and is one part of a complete text unit. In this lesson, students will complete a chart with examples and textual support from an epic to outline examples of the theme of “the struggle for equality” as well as examples and textual support from The Declaration of Independence.

Type: Lesson Plan

Writing for Change: MLK's Letter from Birmingham Jail:

In this lesson, students will anazlye the use of rhetorical appeals in Martin Luther King, Jr.'s 1963 "Letter from Birmingham Jail." Students will read an excerpt of the letter and examine King’s effective use of ethos, logos, and pathos in achieving his purpose.

Type: Lesson Plan

The Importance of Professionalism in the Workplace:

Using the case study, "Training Day: The Importance of Professionalism in the Workplace," students will research proper business etiquette and effective workplace communication. 

Type: Lesson Plan

Language of Letters: Analyzing the Change in Diction and Syntax from Civil War Times to the Present:

This lesson includes a close-reading and text-marking activity using two soldiers' letters, one from the Civil War and one from The War on Terror. Students will discover by looking at word choice and sentence structure how language styles have changed over time.

Type: Lesson Plan

“Greek Mythology Version 2.0: To Be or Not to Be an Epic Hero?”:

In this second lesson out of a three-lesson unit, students will continue analyzing the characteristics of an Epic Hero as they read books 1-10 of The Odyssey. Students will analyze characteristics by looking at the ways in which characters are developed through the decisions they make and/or fail to make.

Type: Lesson Plan

Greek Mythology: The Odyssey, Odysseus and What Makes an Epic Hero Part 3:

In this lesson, students will explore books 13-23 of The Odyssey through text coding and analysis of both character development and theme. For the summative assessment, students will write a short response analyzing characterization and universal themes of Courage and Perseverance in the text and drawing conclusions, supported by textual evidence, about the nature of the Epic Hero.

Type: Lesson Plan

Universal Theme in Poe's "The Masque of the Red Death":

Upon reading “The Masque of the Red Death,” students will analyze the universal theme of humans trying to escape death and will create a one-page visual summary of their analysis in this lesson.

Type: Lesson Plan

Greek Mythology: Exploring Perseus and the Qualities of an Epic Hero:

In this lesson (part one of a three-part unit), students will analyze the characteristics of a Greek hero and explain how these characteristics are developed in the myth of "Perseus." Students will closely read the text, and ask, and answer text-dependent questions as they read the story. These skills will then culminate in later lessons (parts two and three) with a product in the form of an essay or written speech about "Perseus."

Type: Lesson Plan

I Have a Dream Today!:

Students will read and analyze Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr's "I Have a Dream" speech. Using the knowledge and textual evidence gleaned from multiple readings, students will write a short response to support their analysis of this famous speech.

Type: Lesson Plan

An Introduction with Death: A Close Reading of the Prologue from The Book Thief by Markus Zusak:

In this lesson, students will read an excerpt from the prologue of The Book Thief by Markus Zusak. They will focus on how the word choices impact the mood of the excerpt. The summative assessment is a two-paragraph writing assignment which will require students to discuss how Zusak's use of figurative language creates mood in the prologue.

Type: Lesson Plan

Introduction to Learning Theories:

Students will compare and contrast different learning theories and discuss their implications for teaching and learning, in this lesson plan.

Type: Lesson Plan

Universal Themes in "Harrison Bergeron":

Students will read the short story, "Harrison Bergeron," and analyze the universal themes as they relate to dystopian literature in this lesson.

Type: Lesson Plan

Original Student Tutorials

That's So Epic: How Epic Similes Contribute to Mood (Part Two):

Continue to study epic similes in excerpts from The Iliad in Part Two of this two-part series. In Part Two, you'll learn about mood and how the language of an epic simile produces a specified mood in excerpts from The Iliad.

Make sure to complete Part One before beginning Part Two. Click HERE to view "That's So Epic: How Epic Similes Contribute to Mood (Part One)."

Type: Original Student Tutorial

That's So Epic: How Epic Similes Contribute to Mood (Part One):

Learn about how epic similes create mood in a text, specifically in excerpts from The Iliad, in this two-part series.

In Part One, you'll define epic simile, identify epic similes based on defined characteristics, and explain the comparison created in an epic simile.

In Part Two, you'll learn about mood and how the language of an epic simile produces a specified mood in excerpts from The Iliad. Make sure to complete both parts!

Click HERE to view "That's So Epic: How Epic Similes Contribute to Mood (Part Two)." 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How Imagery Creates Mood in Two Poems by Robert Frost:

Explore two poems by Robert Frost: “Pasture” and “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening.” In this interactive tutorial, you’ll identify the author’s use of imagery in each poem and determine the mood that’s created in each poem. By the end of this tutorial, you should be able to explain how imagery contributes to the mood of a poem.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Research Writing: It's Not Magic:

Learn about paraphrasing and the use of direct quotes in this interactive tutorial about research writing. Along the way, you'll also learn about master magician Harry Houdini. This tutorial is part one of a two-part series, so be sure to complete both parts.

Check out part two—Avoiding Plaigiarism: It's Not Magic here.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Teaching Ideas

When Tragedy Strikes: President Reagan's Address to the Nation:

This resource provides teachers with the tools to help students analyze the speech delivered by President Ronald Reagan following the Challenger Space Shuttle disaster. Students will focus on how President Reagan conveys and supports his central idea through the use of two specific rhetorical devices. Students will evaluate how effectively the president applies the use of allusions and anaphora to support his central idea.

Type: Teaching Idea

Roosevelt’s Rhetoric: Analyzing Ethos, Logos, and Pathos:

This teaching idea focuses on FDR’s use of rhetorical appeals (ethos, pathos, & logos) in his inauguration speech. Students will practice identifying his use of these appeals within the text. The resource will help students understand how the president uses rhetorical appeals to convey and support his central idea.

Type: Teaching Idea

Text Resources

Hope During War: Analyzing Rhetorical Appeals:

This teaching resource provides the tools for teachers to help students analyze the use of rhetorical appeals in President Lincoln’s Gettysburg Address. This resource will help students understand how President Lincoln specifically used ethos, pathos, and logos to achieve his purpose.

Type: Text Resource

Leading with Purpose: Analyzing a Speaker's Rhetoric:

This teaching resource provides the tools to help students analyze President George W. Bush’s “9/11 Address to the Nation.” This resource will help students examine the president’s rhetoric and how he uses figurative language to achieve his different purposes. This includes his use of both imagery and alliteration. Students will also examine how the president uses the rhetorical device antithesis to achieve his purposes.

Type: Text Resource

Student Resources

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Original Student Tutorials

That's So Epic: How Epic Similes Contribute to Mood (Part Two):

Continue to study epic similes in excerpts from The Iliad in Part Two of this two-part series. In Part Two, you'll learn about mood and how the language of an epic simile produces a specified mood in excerpts from The Iliad.

Make sure to complete Part One before beginning Part Two. Click HERE to view "That's So Epic: How Epic Similes Contribute to Mood (Part One)."

Type: Original Student Tutorial

That's So Epic: How Epic Similes Contribute to Mood (Part One):

Learn about how epic similes create mood in a text, specifically in excerpts from The Iliad, in this two-part series.

In Part One, you'll define epic simile, identify epic similes based on defined characteristics, and explain the comparison created in an epic simile.

In Part Two, you'll learn about mood and how the language of an epic simile produces a specified mood in excerpts from The Iliad. Make sure to complete both parts!

Click HERE to view "That's So Epic: How Epic Similes Contribute to Mood (Part Two)." 

Type: Original Student Tutorial

How Imagery Creates Mood in Two Poems by Robert Frost:

Explore two poems by Robert Frost: “Pasture” and “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening.” In this interactive tutorial, you’ll identify the author’s use of imagery in each poem and determine the mood that’s created in each poem. By the end of this tutorial, you should be able to explain how imagery contributes to the mood of a poem.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Research Writing: It's Not Magic:

Learn about paraphrasing and the use of direct quotes in this interactive tutorial about research writing. Along the way, you'll also learn about master magician Harry Houdini. This tutorial is part one of a two-part series, so be sure to complete both parts.

Check out part two—Avoiding Plaigiarism: It's Not Magic here.

Type: Original Student Tutorial

Parent Resources

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